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Blog2

  1. 1. HOME<br />ASK SUPER STAR<br />ARCHIVE<br />SUBSCRIBE<br />ROCKSTAR SUPERSTAR PROJECT BLOG - TEENAGE DRUG ABUSE<br />This is THE site for questions pertaining to teenage drug abuse<br />Effects of Positively Involved Fathers – Teenage Drug Abuse<br />by SUPERSTAR on MAY 10, 2011<br />HYPERLINK "http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.rockstarsuperstarproject.com%2Fteenagedrugabuse%2Feffects-of-positively-involved-fathers-teenage-drug-abuse%2F&t=Effects%20of%20Positively%20Involved%20Fathers%20%E2%80%93%20Teenage%20Drug%20Abuse%20%E2%80%94%20ROCKSTAR%20SUPERSTAR%20PROJECT%20BLOG%20-%20TEENAGE%20DRUG%20ABUSE&src=sp"Share<br />18<br />Effects of Positively Involved Fathers are astounding!<br />The Supporting Involvement Program: The First Empirically Supported Family Intervention regarding: Effects of Positively Involved Fathers<br />A vast amount of literature over the past 30 years has consistently evidenced broad benefits regarding child development in relation to positive involved fathering and/or father figures. The benefits are numerous. Clinically significant positive effects have repeatedly been revealed when fathers have been positively involved in their children’s lives. The benefits are continually seen in major areas of kids’ lives, such as cognitive, academic (intellectual), and healthier emotionally, socially, physically & mentally.<br />The information discussed in this blog contains some of the overall general findings and specific data that highlights how irreplaceable involved positive fathering is regarding healthy child development.<br />Positive father involvement has been correlated with: Infants showing higher verbal skills. Children in school scoring higher on assessments of cognitive/ intellectual competence.  Daughter’s increased competence in math and son’s IQ have consistently been associated to father nurturing with toddlers, pre-school children, school children and adolescents.<br />When children grow up with involved fathering, they are more apt to be able to demonstrate critical problem solving abilities. They have increased curiosity, less fear in new situations, greater curiosity, greater tolerance for stress and frustration and are more willing to try new things.<br />Father involvement is a protective measure against children becoming involved with delinquent behavior. Younger children display greater empathy, less gender role stereotyping, a higher awareness of others needs and the rights of others. They are more generous, have higher self-esteem, tend to have more self-control and are less impulsive.<br />Adolescents are less likely to become involved with substance abuse. If they do become involved with substance abuse or alcohol issues, they are more likely to do it to a lesser degree. There is less truancy, stealing, and a lower frequency of acting out behaviorally with being disruptive, depressed, feeling sad and lying.<br />The First 30 Days to Serenity Book - Order your copy TODAY!<br />In contrast to current public views on father involvement, which propose that men’s family involvement is a matter of having values rather than the belief that most fathers have a desire to be positively involved in their children’s lives, “The Supporting Fathers Involvement Program,” (SFI) is based on empirically supported family system model of central components that have been statistically correlated with fathers’ family involvement.<br />SFI is the first known evidenced-based program that has been developed for a variety of low-income culturally diverse families. SFI reaches fathers by also reaching mothers’ and children. SFI has been developed from a research/intervention study that became active in 2003 in 5 separate counties of Northern California. Each SFI program attached itself to a Family Resource Center in order for the case managers of each site to have the opportunity to be able to provide services such as mental health referrals, employment referrals, and housing opportunities to the families involved in the study. The five sites were made up of Caucasians, Mexican American (Latino) and African American families. The study has been funded by a grant from the Office of Child Abuse and Neglect (OCAP).<br />The short version of the findings in the SFI study, turned, project, turned evidenced based intervention has been exciting, to say the least.<br /> <br />The Program and intervention is based on five interconnected family domains know to affect family health, mental health, and child abuse outcomes:<br />1.      Individual characteristic of parents<br />2.      Parent-child relationship quality<br />3.      Couple or co-parenting quality<br />4.      The intergenerational transmission of parent-child involvement and relationships<br />5.      External influence such as social support systems, employment, and environmental stressors.<br />Phase I of the SFI study included 289 families that were mostly low-income Mexican American, with youngest children aged birth to 7 years. There was a fathers ‘only group and a couples group. The results have been reported at a number of scientific meetings in this country and abroad and in four published papers describing the qualitative and quantitative results. The findings are clearly positive.<br />Using measures of validity, pre and post assessments were used in order to validate some of the findings. Couple participation consistently increased father involvement in childcare and psychological involvement. Couple satisfaction was maintained over time. Lower parenting stress, lower personal distress, and no increase in their children’s problem behavior over the same period.<br />These intervention effects reported above held across ethnic group membership, income level, and marital status. These positive changes were maintained over the next three years.<br />Why am I telling you about how important involved fatherhood is?<br />My personal experience as a young teenager who turned to the dark side immediately after my father died was a poor decision by me. My father was 44 years old when he died suddenly after never being sick a day in his life. I was 14 years old and he was my idol. I worshipped him and for the most part, he was God to me. I was always a funny, happy go lucky type of person until my dad died. In no way am I a victim. However, I did behave as one and it did a great deal of harm to myself as well as hurt many people that only wanted good things for me. The literature on positive involved fathering has been straight forward with adolescents’ using less drugs and alcohol. The dynamite thing here is that not only can you choose to do the better way, but also if you have chosen to go off the path, you can get on and do whatever you want to do. By the way, the father figure does not need to be biological. It can be a stepparent, grandfather or an older man who becomes a mentor to you.<br />Lawrence Ferber, Ph.D.,<br />Licensed Clinical Psychologist/Research<br />Staff Member ”Supporting Fathers Involvement Study/Project/Evidenced Based Intervention.”<br />HYPERLINK "http://blog.rockstarsuperstarproject.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/1POC8021.jpg"<br />BIO:<br />I am a Licensed Professional Clinical & Research Psychologist in the States of New York and California who earned a Ph.D. in Psychology after earning my living as a professional musician for over 2 decades. I have worked extensively with adolescents and adults with substance use disorders. I have experience with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavioral Modification and Motivational Interviewing. I continue to play music and practice hours a day because it is a huge passion of mine.<br />For approximately the last 4 years I have worked with world renowned family scientists’ Phillip Cowen, Carolyn Pape Cowen, Marsha Kline Pruett, and Kyle Pruett on a study that was built on over 30 years of peer reviewed research that examined the effects of father involvement, co-parenting, and child development. “The Supporting Fathers Involvement Project” is recognized as a viable preventative family intervention/treatment by the “California Evidenced Based-Clearing House for Child Welfare.” Currently, the project takes place in 5 separate counties located in Northern California.<br /> <br />You can reach me at lawrenceferber@sbcglobal.net or just view my profile on Linkedin.<br />Here’s some rockin’ things happening …<br />* Serenity CD available for sale as of October 2010<br />* First 30 Days to Serenity by Super Star now published!!!<br />* Skype discussion/presentation (middle and high school students) with Super Star – happening now!<br />* Fundraising program for schools and organizations selling RSSS brand merchandise<br />* Got Serenity? School (middle, high school and college) assembly presentations – happening now!<br />* Rockin’ Recovery Month Concert Tour — September 2011<br />Have you ordered your copy of Serenity yet?<br />NOTE TO THE READER: This blog is written with the understanding that the content is strictly the experiences and thoughts of the author. The author is not engaged in rendering psychological, financial, legal, or other professional services. If expert assistance or counseling is needed, the services of a competent professional should be sought. Any application of this material is at the reader’s discretion and sole responsibility.<br />Please Social Bookmark us!<br />LikeDislikeCommunityDisqus<br />Add New Comment<br />Type your comment here.<br />Image<br />Post as …<br />Showing 0 comments<br />Sort by Popular now Best rating Newest first Oldest first   Subscribe by email   Subscribe by RSS<br />blog comments powered by DISQUS<br />PREVIOUS POST: Rock and Rolling My Way To Recovery<br />HYPERLINK "http://www.rsssworldwide.com/"<br />Please join our ROCKSTAR SUPERSTAR PROJECT Facebook Fanpage
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