Lattice Energy LLC                                                May 29, 2012Subject: comments regarding a companion tech...
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Lattice Energy LLC-Comment re 1927 Caltech Electric Arc Transmutation Experiments-May 29 2012

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In a hypothetical Widom-Larsen LENR network, unstable isotopes of Lead and Bismuth created by neutron capture processes will spontaneously transmute via alpha-decays into unstable isotopes of Mercury and Thallium, respectively, which could potentially be detected analytically. Such LENR network products were apparently observed by L. Thomassen in experimental work that he conducted for his PhD at Caltech in 1927. A summary of these results was subsequently published in peer-reviewed Physical Review in 1929.

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Lattice Energy LLC-Comment re 1927 Caltech Electric Arc Transmutation Experiments-May 29 2012

  1. 1. Lattice Energy LLC May 29, 2012Subject: comments regarding a companion technical Addendum to Lattice’s earlier May 19, 2012,presentation about WLT LENR transmutation of scrap Tungsten metal into Gold that is as follows:“Addendum to May 19, 2012, Lattice Technical Overview” 180“In 74W -seed LENR neutron-catalyzed transmutation network, unstable isotopes of Lead and Bismuthwill spontaneously transmute into unstable isotopes of Mercury and Thallium, respectively, which couldbe detected. Apparently observed by L. Thomassen in experimental work for his PhD at Caltech in 1927”Lewis Larsen, Lattice Energy LLC [34 pages in MS-Word 8.5 x 11 document format]May 26, 2012http://www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/lattice-energy-llcaddendum-to-may-19-2012-technical-overview1927-caltech-experimentsmay-26-2012In the hypothetical Widom-Larsen LENR network, unstable isotopes of Lead and Bismuth created byneutron capture processes will spontaneously transmute via alpha-decays into unstable isotopes ofMercury and Thallium, respectively, which could potentially be detected analytically. Such LENR networkproducts were apparently observed by L. Thomassen in experimental work that he conducted for his PhDat Caltech in 1927 (as well as in experiments conducted by other researchers that Thomassendiscusses). A shorter version of these results was subsequently published in peer-reviewed “PhysicalReview” in 1929; he was advised in this work by Prof. R. Millikan, who was then on the faculty at Caltechand who had received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1923 and was intrigued with subject of transmutation.Unbeknownst to all of these very likely competent researchers working in the early 1900s, they wereactually struggling with very subtle, tricky nanoscale LENR processes that can occur in condensedmatter. Given an utter lack of knowledge about LENRs back then (indeed, much of what is known aboutnuclear science today and all of nanotech had simply not been discovered yet), it is not at all surprisingthat experimentalists ca. the 1920s had major problems with spotty, inconclusive laboratory results andlow levels of experimental reproducibility. Indeed, much of the acrimony about LENRs that has transpiredin the world scientific community since Pons & Fleischmann in 1989 has involved the very same issue.So just like today, the subject of triggering nuclear transmutations under relatively ‘mild’ physicalconditions was controversial during the late 1920s. Indeed, underlying tension about the possibility ofextremely contentious results is almost palpable in Thomassen’s fascinating 1927 Caltech thesis.Interestingly and also perhaps not surprisingly, it appears that the whole line of inquiry involving electric-arc-triggered-transmutations appears to have more-or-less died out worldwide by the time JamesChadwick confirmed the existence of the neutron in 1932. It is tempting to speculate that problems withexperimental reproducibility were a major factor in the premature demise of such work.All that said, today in 2012 things are different: (1) scientists can now benefit from the published Widom-Larsen theory of LENRs which successfully explains a huge array of earlier results (including the best1920s electric arc experiments) and can help guide new, more productive experimentation; and (2) unlike1989 – 1994 (after which the vast majority of ‘mainstream’ scientists ceased being interested in LENRs),as of 2012 the science of nanotechnology (e.g., plasmonics, techniques for fabrication of nanostructures,materials science, etc.) has finally advanced to the point where it can be usefully applied to substantiallyimprove both experimental reproducibility and WLT neutron production rates, thus potentially enablingsuccessful commercialization of LENRs for cost-effective production of energy and valuabletransmutation products (e.g., Gold, Platinum, etc.) at some point in the not-too-distant future.Questions and inquiries are welcome. Thank you.Lewis LarsenLattice Energy LLCChicago, IL USA1-312-861-0115Copyright 2012, Lattice Energy LLC All rights reserved Page 1

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