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How to Build a Yearbook Spread

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Copyright Jostens

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
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How to Build a Yearbook Spread

  1. 1. MODULE 18: DESIGN 2
  2. 2. The dominant element should be placed on the spread first. The dominant element drives the placement of the eyeline. Secondary elements are grouped around the dominant.
  3. 3. STEP ONE | Begin by establishing the margins and column guides. An 18-column grid is used.
  4. 4. STEP ONE | Begin by establishing the margins and column guides. An 18-column grid is used. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  5. 5. STEP TWO | Following the column grid, the dominant photo is the first element placed on the spread.
  6. 6. STEP THREE | The dominant photo guides the placement of an eyeline running horizontally across the spread.
  7. 7. STEP FOUR | The dominant photo strategically guides the eye into the headline and story module.
  8. 8. STEP FIVE | Secondary photos are placed around the dominant, maintaining the eyeline and following the column grid.
  9. 9. STEP SIX | Captions are placed within the column grid and to the outside rather than between the photos.
  10. 10. FINAL RESULTS | Guides, margins, eyeline and column grid disappear leaving effectively-organized content.
  11. 11. Space is very powerful. Planned space organizes the content. Unplanned white space weakens the design.
  12. 12. STANDARD SPACING | Default, one-pica spacing is used consistently between many of the content elements. STANDARD SPACING
  13. 13. EXPANDED SPACING | By leaving a column grid empty, a rail is created. The secondary headline bridges the rail. EXPANDED SPACING
  14. 14. TIGHT SPACING | Generally 1 to 6 points used to package photos and other elements that belong together. TIGHT SPACING
  15. 15. LEVELS OF SPACING | Vertical and horizontal rails of expanded spacing, tight spacing and standard spacing.
  16. 16. A template is an electronic prototype of the design. Templates promote consistent story and caption sizes. Templates establish consistent use of graphics.
  17. 17. SIMILAR YET DIFFERENT | Templates promote unity and variety while building each design around the content.
  18. 18. SIMILAR YET DIFFERENT | Templates promote unity and variety while building each design around the content.
  19. 19. SIMILAR YET DIFFERENT | Templates promote unity and variety while building each design around the content.
  20. 20. MODULE 18: DESIGN 2

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