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2.2 A co-constructed curriculum

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Presentation at #CAN 2018 held at the University of Winchester by the University of Portsmouth

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2.2 A co-constructed curriculum

  1. 1. A co-constructed curriculum: a model for implementing total institutional change in partnership with students Amy Barlow, Head of Academic Development Dr Harriet Dunbar-Morris, Associate Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Experience) Angel Layer, Vice President (Education and Democracy)
  2. 2. The National Union of Students (NUS) understands partnerships as “…investing students with the power to co-create, not just knowledge or learning, but the higher education institution itself…a corollary of a partnership approach is the genuine, meaningful dispersal of power….shared responsibility for identifying the problem or opportunity for development, for devising – importantly – for co-delivery of that solution”. (NUS 2012, p.8).
  3. 3. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  4. 4. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  5. 5. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  6. 6. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  7. 7. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  8. 8. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  9. 9. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  10. 10. Education Strategy We will: • Empower students as partners in a community of learning where staff, students, practising professionals and employers can work together to learn, create, research and solve problems • Promote, develop and foster a culture of co-creation and partnership, and extend the opportunities for students to engage in peer and inter-cohort training and mentoring programmes • Encourage feedback from our students and act upon it • Engage with our students, including through working in partnership with the Students’ Union, to ensure that their voice is heard in discussions and decisions that impact on their education or the wider student experience
  11. 11. Listening and responding to the student voice • Gathering information • Triangulation of information • Acting on information
  12. 12. • Assessment & Feedback Listening and responding to the student voice
  13. 13. Portsmouth graduates will be knowledgeable, informed, intellectually curious, responsible, self- aware and self-motivated, independent learners set for success in their future careers Portsmouth Graduate EVELOPING THED
  14. 14. STUDENT FEEDBACK
  15. 15. STUDENT FEEDBACK • Some units I feel have a perfect workload i.e. ones which include two 2000 essays/reports which are due in at the end of first term and end of second term. However there are other units which have two hours worth of lectures per week plus two hour practical which have assignments due every 3/4 weeks. • Not having all the assessments due in on the same date. • All the exams are close to each other at the end of the year. • All artefacts due in the same time. • I like when the units have a clear assessment guidance. • Not enough tests and oral presentations. • I think have summative examinations at the end of the academic year in May-June work well. Could possibly introduce a more formative exam period in January. • I think it really does depend on the content of the module and the way it is assessed and run. If a module is heavily theoretical, with a big exam, 6 modules may be about right. But if you have more practical based modules, or essay type exams then an additional module, I think, could allow for so much more development and scope within the course. • I think [6 units at once] is too much especially first year, it feels overwhelming especially when you have
  16. 16. STUDENT FEEDBACK Volume & Timing • 84% of students are satisfied with the volume, timing, and nature of their assessments. They told us that they have lots of preparation time, that deadlines can be negotiated, and that lecturers can adapt assessments to suit their needs. However, even more students highlighted that there are recurring issues in deadline bunching, both in terms of multiple deadlines being set at the same time, often the same day, and little time to complete assignments after finishing a topic or receiving feedback, both of which have resulted in difficulties in managing workloads. The 2015 NSS supported this feedback, and qualitative data also showed disparity in word count allowances, which should have more consistency across courses. • The University should review communications, both across units within a course, and across courses for Joint Honours students to reduce clusters of assessments • Staff should continue to work to ensure that core exam and assignment dates do not clash • A working group of students should be setup to develop a unified strategy based on the NUS ‘Assessment and Feedback benchmarking tool’ to create an Assessment & Feedback charter
  17. 17. CURRICULUM 2019 - Revised credit structures across our course portfolio - All courses mapped to deliver the Hallmarks of Portsmouth Graduate - Co-construction of new modules - TESTA targeted to improve low NSS Assessment and Feedback Scores - Student Union representation across steering and project groups
  18. 18. 5 minute discussion activity Student Hallmark: Have an enterprising spirit, bringing innovation and productivity to the groups and communities to which they belong. Student Hallmark: Be informed citizens, with a sense of responsibility allied to a commitment to ethical practice and social justice issues, such as equality, respect and sustainability. How do you interpret these Student Hallmarks? How would you measure achievement in these areas?
  19. 19. Hallmarks in Curriculum Design Ensuring an excellent student experience through the delivery of courses that provide the knowledge, skills and attributes for success, as defined in the Hallmarks of the Portsmouth Graduate. e.g.: • Be able to synthesise new and existing knowledge to generate ideas and develop creative solutions of benefit to the economy and society. • Be intellectually curious, embrace challenges and seize opportunities for development.
  20. 20. “Assessing Graduate Attributes is essential to their successful implementation “. (Hughes & Barrie, 2010; Fraser & Thomas, 2013). How can we measure behaving ethically? How can a contribution to society be quantified? What does curiosity and seizing opportunities look like in a Course Specification?
  21. 21. Learning Outcomes? Ipperciel and ElAtia (2014)
  22. 22. A Reflective Tool for Course Teams
  23. 23. A Reflective tool for Students
  24. 24. What are we learning Agreeing on a shared language and terminology, through co- construction does not guarantee that all staff and students will have shared interpretations - and that’s ok
  25. 25. What are we learning Different disciplinary interpretations are an important consideration when embedding an overarching strategy such as the Hallmarks
  26. 26. What are we learning Live communication channels between students, staff and management are equally as important to success as the co- construction activity
  27. 27. Thank you amy.barlow@port.ac.uk harriet.dunbar-morris@port.ac.uk angel.layer@upsu.net
  28. 28. Barrie, S. C. (2007). A conceptual framework for the teaching and learning of generic graduate attributes. Studies in Higher Education, 32(4), 439-458. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03075070701476100 Ipperciel, D., & ElAtia, S. (2014). Assessing graduate attributes: Building a criteria-based competency model. International Journal of Higher Education, 3(3), 27. References

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