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Lecture ready class 5

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Lecture ready class 5

  1. 1. C L A S S 5 Sophomore English
  2. 2. Last Time - Target Audience Last time we talked about advertising and Target Audiences We also listened to a student presentation and talked about posture, eye contact, and volume. Unit 1 Chapter 1 is finished, so we are going to do a group review.
  3. 3. Chapter 1 Work with your group to complete the crossword puzzle. I will count this as a quiz, so work together carefully, and NO TALKING WITH OTHER GROUPS.
  4. 4. Chapter 2 Vocabulary fraud - n.; 騙局 Ponzi scheme - n.; 老鼠會 shareholder - n.; 股東 scandal - n., 醜聞 crisis - n.; 危機 bankrupt - n.; 破產 executive - n.; 高階主管 accountant - n.; 會計師 exaggerated - adj.; 誇大的 collapse - v.; 崩潰 charge - v.; 起訴 accountability - n.; 信用度 corruption - n.; 腐敗 asset - n.; 資產 white-collar crime - n.;白領犯罪 commit a crime - v.; 犯罪 verify - v.; 驗證 ethics - n.; 道德;倫理 financial statements - n.; 財務報表 Chapter 2 talks about corporate fraud (also called white collar crime) Make sure you know the vocabulary before we begin. Read page 15 and try to answer the questions on page 16.
  5. 5. Expressions that signal a new idea Examples of rhetorical questions  Let me start with…  Let’s start by…  Now let’s talk about…  Okay, let’s move on to…  Next, I’d like to discuss…  Let’s look at… etc.  How can we explain this? Well…  What does this mean? Let’s look at…  How can this be? Well…  Why does this happen? Let me tell you… etc. Lecture Language for Transitions
  6. 6. Page 17, Part I Now that we’ve discussed some well-known cases of corporate crime, I’d like to discuss a U.S. law that was passed to help prevent it: the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The aim of this law was to improve accountability of corporations and to prevent future cases of accounting fraud. Let’s take a look at some of its requirements. First of all, it requires companies to establish independent audit committees– independent accountants who are required to report honestly about company finances. It also prohibits companies from making loans to their executives. In addition, it holds top executives responsible for any mistakes or false statements on a company’s financial records, and it creates strict penalties for committing corporate fraud. Finally, it protects whistleblowers–employees who report fraud within the company. So, what has been the effect of Sarbanes-Oxley? Well, companies complain that the regulations in Sarbanes-Oxley are too expensive to implement, and this hurts business. However, supporters of this law feel that it is necessary for preventing and punishing white-collar crime. Others argue that even more action needs to be taken.
  7. 7. Page 17, Part I Now that we’ve discussed some well-known cases of corporate crime, I’d like to discuss a U.S. law that was passed to help prevent it: the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The aim of this law was to improve accountability of corporations and to prevent future cases of accounting fraud. Let’s take a look at some of its requirements. First of all, it requires companies to establish independent audit committees– independent accountants who are required to report honestly about company finances. It also prohibits companies from making loans to their executives. In addition, it holds top executives responsible for any mistakes or false statements on a company’s financial records, and it creates strict penalties for committing corporate fraud. Finally, it protects whistleblowers–employees who report fraud within the company. So, what has been the effect of Sarbanes-Oxley? Well, companies complain that the regulations in Sarbanes-Oxley are too expensive to implement, and this hurts business. However, supporters of this law feel that it is necessary for preventing and punishing white-collar crime. Others argue that even more action needs to be taken.
  8. 8. Page 18 - Listen Listen to the beginning of a lecture about the ethical behavior of men and women executives. Write T for true and F for false for each statement. 1) 2) 3)
  9. 9. Page 18 - Listen Listen to the beginning of a lecture about the ethical behavior of men and women executives. Write T for true and F for false for each statement. 1) F 2) T 3) T
  10. 10. Page 18, Part K Listen to the lecture again and write down the lecture language that signals a transition. Then listen again, and write down the idea that follows the transition 1. Transition lecture language: New Idea: 2. Transition lecture language: New Idea: 3. Transition lecture language: New Idea: 4. Transition lecture language: New Idea: 5. Transition lecture language: New Idea:
  11. 11. Page 18, Part K Listen to the lecture again and write down the lecture language that signals a transition. Then listen again, and write down the idea that follows the transition 1. Transition lecture language: First we’re going to look at . . . New Idea: the behavior of men and women in the workplace 2. Transition lecture language: Let’s take a look at . . . New Idea: some statistics 3. Transition lecture language: Next, let’s look at . . . New Idea: some statistics involving corporate crimes 4. Transition lecture language: Okay, so what does this all mean? Are women just as corrupt as men? New Idea: Maybe not. Men actually commit more crimes than women in the workplace. 5. Transition lecture language: Now…let’s move on to . . . New Idea: some specific cases of corporate corruption involving women

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