Examples of range-changes between SABAP1 and SABAP2

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SABAP2 is the most important bird conservation project in South Africa. This is because conservation interventions depend on knowing the distributions of species and how they are changing. This slideshow gives some examples of changes between the first and second bird atlas projects, SABAP1 and SABAP2

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Examples of range-changes between SABAP1 and SABAP2

  1. 1. SABAP2Southern African Bird Atlas Project 2Range changes ofselected species Les Underhill, Doug Harebottle and Michael Brooks Animal Demography Unit Department of Zoology University of Cape Town http://sabap2.adu.org.za
  2. 2. SABAP2 is a partnership between the AnimalDemography Unit at the University of Cape Town,BirdLife South Africa and the South AfricanNational Biodiversity Institute (SANBI)
  3. 3. • These seven species are a tiny sample of those which show range changes between the first and second bird atlas projects• SABAP1 data collection took place mainly between 1987 and 1991• SABAP2 started in July 2007 and is ongoing
  4. 4. Read this first!• The blocks on the maps are quarter degree grid cells (QDGC)• RED = seen in SABAP1 but not in SABAP2 = maybe it’s gone extinct in QDGC• ORANGE = recorded less frequently in SABAP2 than SABAP1 = maybe it’s becoming less common in QDGC• YELLOW = same frequency of records in both projects• GREEN = recorded more frequently in SABAP2 than SABAP1 = maybe it’s becoming more common in QDGC• BLUE = seen in SABAP2 but not in SABAP1 = maybe it’s colonized the QDGC• PINK = the species occurred here in SABAP1, but there is not yet SABAP2 data for this QDGC• Everything is couched in MAYBEs. These are not the definitive, authoritative analyses. These are being done. But so far, these results are all standing up to scrutiny
  5. 5. The map is mostly RED andORANGE. Black Storks are beingrecorded far less frequently inSABAP2 than in SABAP1. Thereason is unclear. This was a changethat no one suspected until thisrange-change map was produced
  6. 6. The map is mostly ORANGE. There seemto be fewer Hamerkops during SABAP2than there were in SABAP1. Once again,the reason is unclear. This was also achange that no one suspected until thisrange-change map was produced
  7. 7. This is an unusual range change map. Inthe northeast it is mostly RED aandORANGE. It seems to get increasinglyGREENER towards the Western Cape,and there seems to be a bit of rangeexpansion northwards in the NW cornerof the Western Cape. The grasslands ofthe Highveld were the former range ofthe Blue Crane, and from this it seems tobe disappearing. But the new core of thedistribution is in the wheat-growingregions of the Swartland and Overberg inthe Western Cape. It is criticallydependent on the current agriculturalregime in these regions
  8. 8. The map is mostly GREEN! Althoughthere has not been much rangeexpansion, there has been a big increasein the abundance of Egyptian Geese overthe SABAP2 region since SABAP1. Thisis probably because this species hasadapted to agriculture and to living intowns and cities. There are also lotsmore Egyptian Geese on the shorelinethan in former times
  9. 9. The map is has lots of RED andORANGE, but also some GREEN andBLUE. But the overall consensus is thatthe Secretarybird is not doing well atpresent. It is being recorded lessfrequently in SABAP2 than it was duringSABAP1. The reasons are unclear. Thiswas a change that no one reallysuspected until this range-change mapwas produced
  10. 10. The map is mostly RED and ORANGE, especiallyin the Western Cape. Ground Woodpeckers arebeing recorded far less frequently in SABAP2than in SABAP1. This was a change that was notsuspected until this range-change map wasproduced. Potentially, this is a climate changeimpact, because there have been no human-induced changes of its mountainous habitat
  11. 11. The map is mostly BLUE and GREEN.Common Mynas have expanded their rangemassively since SABAP1. But it is a surprisethat they now appear to be less common inKwaZulu-Natal than during SABAP1. ThisORANGE region was the core of their rangeat that time. The range of this species inexpanding rapidly, and the ongoing SABAP2project is keeping track of this in aremarkable way. It is even expanding intothe Kruger National Park
  12. 12. • There are lots more examples like these• SABAP2 has made a huge contribution to the “broad brush” monitoring of all bird species• It is important that this project continue• If you can help to sponsor SABAP2, please contact Les Underhill les.underhill@uct.ac.za• Or you can do an EFT: – UCT donations account, Standard Bank, Rondebosch – Branch 025009, Account 071522387 (SWIFT code is SBZAZAJJ) – Beneficiary reference: Fund 231454 (this is the ADU’s donations “fund” and tells the University where to transfer the money to) – Please send an email to Sue Kuyper sue.kuyper@uct.ac.za and tell her that you want the donation to be allocated to SABAP2 – This email also enables UCT to send a Section 18A tax donation certificate
  13. 13. • There are lots more examples like these• SABAP2 has made a huge contribution to the “broad brush” monitoring of all charge any "levy" on to UCT does not bird species donations; the entire amount comes• It is important that this project is a levy onservices we the ADU. There continue contracts, but the multiple formal get for the amount we pay are pretty good – the ADU projects could not be• If you can help to sponsor SABAP2, please contact of the run cheaper off campus – one Les Underhill les.underhill@uct.ac.zaimportant benefits isonto fantastic most high quality access we get the the• Or you can do an EFT: global internet highways! – UCT donations account, Standard Bank, Rondebosch – Branch 025009, Account 071522387 (SWIFT code is SBZAZAJJ) – Beneficiary reference: Fund 231454 (this is the ADU’s donations “fund” and tells the University where to transfer the money to) – Please send an email to Sue Kuyper sue.kuyper@uct.ac.za and tell her that you want the donation to be allocated to SABAP2 – This email also enables UCT to send a Section 18A tax donation certificate

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