No Child Left Behind Powerpoint

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No Child Left Behind Powerpoint

  1. 1. <ul><li>No Child Left Behind Act: What’s in the New Education Reform Law </li></ul>
  2. 2. No Child Left Behind <ul><li>There are three key hallmarks of the new bill: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Testing </li></ul><ul><li>2. Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>3. Flexibility </li></ul>
  3. 3. No Child Left Behind <ul><li>Under the new law, all states must now hold students and districts accountable for student proficiency gains by subgroups in math, reading, and eventually, science. </li></ul>
  4. 4. NCLB: Testing and Accountability <ul><li>States must ensure all students are tested annually in reading and math by the 2005-06 school year. </li></ul><ul><li>By 2007, all states must administer an annual assessment in science in at least one grade level: 3-5, 6-9, and 10-12. </li></ul>
  5. 5. NCLB: Testing and Accountability <ul><li>States must set--then meet—adequate yearly progress (AYP) targets toward the goal of having all children meet proficiency levels in core subjects by the 2013-14 school year. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools that fail to meet AYP face sanctions, including providing supplemental services, transportation to other schools, and restructuring. </li></ul>
  6. 6. NCLB: Highly Qualified Teachers <ul><li>By the end of 2005-06 school year, the law requires all states ensure that every classroom teacher is “highly qualified”. To meet this definition, teachers must be certified or licensed; hold a bachelor’s degree; and have demonstrated competencies in his or her teaching area, to be determined by the state. </li></ul>
  7. 7. NCLB: Highly Qualified Teachers <ul><li>To meet the law’s requirement, States (and districts) must develop a measurable plan to increase the number of all core subject teachers who are highly qualified. This plan must include an increase in the number of teachers who are participating in high quality professional development. </li></ul>
  8. 8. NCLB: Teacher Quality Accountability <ul><li>Based on this plan, after 2 years without meeting annual goals/steps the state has determined to increase the number of highly qualified teachers, the district must develop a strict improvement plan and the SEA must provide assistance. After 3 years, SEA steps in to provide professional development. </li></ul>
  9. 9. NCLB: Title II Part A Teacher Quality Grants <ul><li>To help districts and states ensure that every teacher is “highly qualified,” Congress created Title II Part A funds. Over $2.8 billion has been made available to states and school districts nationwide under Title II Part A, during the 2002-2003 school year. </li></ul>
  10. 10. NCLB: Title II Part A <ul><li>$2.85 Billion by Formula to States (35 percent based on school age population, 65 based on low income schools) </li></ul><ul><li>1% goes to State Administration, then </li></ul><ul><li>2.5% goes for State Agency for Higher Ed Partnership Grants, and </li></ul><ul><li>2.5% go for State Programs, then </li></ul><ul><li>95% reserved for subgrants to districts </li></ul>
  11. 11. NCLB: Title II, Part A <ul><li>State Agency for Higher Ed Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Similar to Eisenhower Higher Education Grant Program – NO M/S set-aside </li></ul><ul><li>FY 2002 approximately $70 million </li></ul><ul><li>FY 2001 (Eisenhower SAHE State Grants) approximately $70 million </li></ul>
  12. 12. NCLB: Title II, Part A <ul><li>State Level Programs (Funding can be used for professional development) </li></ul><ul><li>FY 2002 approximately $70 million </li></ul><ul><li>FY 2001 (Eisenhower State-Level Programs) approximately $12 million </li></ul>
  13. 13. NCLB: For LEAs To Receive Title II , Part A Funds <ul><li>95 percent of Title II funds are reserved as subgrants for districts. </li></ul><ul><li>Districts must apply to the state education agency for Title II funds. First, the district must conduct a NEEDS ASSESSMENT of the teaching force. (Applications for FY2002 are already in – new guidance may require needs assessments for FY2003 or future applications.) </li></ul><ul><li>*Teachers must be involved in the </li></ul><ul><li>needs assessment! </li></ul>
  14. 14. NCLB: For LEAs To Receive Title II, Part A Funds <ul><li>Using the results of the needs assessment, districts must develop a LOCAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN which will determine the activities the district will undertake to ensure ALL teachers are highly qualified. This plan must be included in the application to the state for Title II funds. (Applications for FY2003 funds) </li></ul><ul><li>*Teachers must be involved in the Local Improvement Plan! </li></ul>
  15. 15. Local Improvement Plan Must Include: <ul><li>The results of the needs assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Activities the district will carry out with funds, including professional development </li></ul><ul><li>How the activities are based on scientifically based research and why they are expected to increase student achievement </li></ul>
  16. 16. Part A Local Improvement Plan Must Include: <ul><li>How district will ensure the professional development needs of teachers will be met </li></ul><ul><li>How the district will use the funds to increase the percentage of highly qualified teachers and increase the number of teachers receiving professional development </li></ul><ul><li>How teachers, parents, etc. have collaborated to develop the local plan </li></ul>
  17. 17. LEA Uses of Title II Funds <ul><li>Recruitment and hiring </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development </li></ul><ul><li>Certification, Licensure, mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher testing </li></ul><ul><li>Merit pay, differential pay, performance bonuses </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability efforts </li></ul>
  18. 18. LEA Uses of Title II Funds <ul><li>Districts have expanded flexibility in the use of these funds. They are not required to use funds just on math and science education. </li></ul><ul><li>However . . . </li></ul><ul><li>Congress fully intended that Title II funds CONTINUE to be used for science education! </li></ul>
  19. 19. LEA Uses of Title II Funds <ul><li>When determining how Title II funds are to be used, based on the needs assessment, keep in mind that ALL teachers, including science teachers, need to be fully qualified by 2005-06. Also, state science assessments begin in 2007. </li></ul>
  20. 20. LEA Uses of Funds <ul><li>CAN THESE FUNDS BE USED FOR NATIONAL AND STATE CONVENTIONS? </li></ul><ul><li>YES . . . IF attendance at these conventions is part of the teacher’s individual professional development plan </li></ul>
  21. 21. NCLB - Flexibility <ul><li>Districts have flexible use of Title II funds. They can opt to move 50 percent of funds from one or all of four major federal programs (Teacher Quality State Grants, Education Technology, Safe and Drug Free Schools, and Innovative Education Programs) into Title I programs, or into any one of these programs. </li></ul>
  22. 22. NCLB Resources Available to Science Teachers <ul><li>In addition to Title II Part A, science educators should be familiar with these programs in NCLB: </li></ul><ul><li>Title II, Part B: Math/Science Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Title II Part D: Education Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Title V, Part A: Innovative Education Programs </li></ul>
  23. 23. Title II, Part B: Math and Science Partnerships <ul><li>M/S Partnerships will receive $12.5 million in FY 2002. Congressional authorizers had requested $450 mil for this program. </li></ul><ul><li>If yearly appropriations are above $100 million, $$ goes to the states. Partnerships apply to the State Education Agency for the competitive grants. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Title II Part D Education Technology <ul><li>Title II Part D (Technology): Combines the Technology Literacy Challenge and Technology Innovation Challenge. ($700 million FY 2002) Formula grant to the state, based on Title I formulas. State uses 5 percent for state activities. 50 percent goes to LEAS based on Title I formula; 50 percent goes as competitive grants to districts or eligible partners. 25 percent must be used for teacher training in technology. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Title V, Part A <ul><li>Title V, Part A: ($385 million FY 2002) Old Title VI block grants, now the Innovative Education Programs. Formula grants to states based on school aged population. 85 percent allocated to districts based on enrollments. 27 uses of funds, including teacher training and acquisition of materials. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Seven Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>The law requires states to develop plans with annual measurable objectives that will ensure that all math and science teachers are “highly qualified” by the end of the 2005-2006 school year.  (Highly qualified means all teachers must be certified or licensed, hold a bachelor’s degree, and have demonstrated competencies in his or her teaching area, as determined by the state.) </li></ul>
  27. 27. Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>2. Over $2.8 billion will be made available to states and school districts nationwide under Title II Part A, during the 2002-2003 school year. </li></ul><ul><li>Districts have more funds available for Professional Development in 2002-2003 than the did in 2001-2002 </li></ul>
  28. 28. Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>3. While there is no set-aside for math and science in Title II, all of the funding that a district receives for Title II can be used for professional development, including math and science professional development if a district so chooses. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>4. In order for a district to continue to receive Title II funding it must conduct an assessment of its professional development and hiring needs. This needs assessment must be carried out with the involvement of teachers. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>5. In order for a district to receive Title II funding, it must submit to the state an application which includes a plan to improve teacher quality, based on the results of the needs assessment. Teachers must be involved in the preparation of this plan.   </li></ul>
  31. 31. Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>6. States will be required to test students in math and reading every year in grades 3 through 8. States must set—then meet—rigorous adequate yearly progress marks toward having all students proficient in these areas by the end of the 2013-14 school year. States must administer an annual assessment of student achievement in science at least once in grades 3-5, 6-9, and 10-12, beginning in 2007. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Quick Facts: NCLB <ul><li>7. Districts have flexible use of Title II funds. They can opt to move 50 percent of funds from one or all of four major federal programs (Teacher Quality State Grants, Education Technology, Safe and Drug Free Schools, and Innovative Education Programs) into Title I programs, or into any one of these programs. </li></ul>
  33. 33. NCLB: For More Information <ul><li>NSTA Website: www.nsta.org </li></ul><ul><li>Title II Guidance: www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/SIP/TitleIIguidance2002.doc </li></ul><ul><li>EMAIL YOUR QUESTIONS TO: </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] --or– [email_address] </li></ul>

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