By Carolina Seibel
Walden University
EDUC-6706R-4
The Beginning Reader, PreK-3
Dr. Denise Love
Tompkins (2010) describes what teachers do in a literacy enriched
classroom:
 Balance explicit instruction with authentic...
 Dr. Almansi (2010) discusses the importance of
getting to know your students through activities
and Dr. Afflerbach (2010...
 Non-cognitive assessments measure a student’s
motivation and attitude towards reading. Students
must believe in themselv...
 Non-cognitive assessments used
 ERAS (Elementary Reading Attitude Survey). This
survey asks questions about a child's i...
Cognitive assessments focus on how a child
masters literacy skills and strategies as they
develop as readers, such as phon...
 Cognitive assessments used
 EasyCBM, which identifies one minute fluencies in the
following areas--phoneme segmentation...
By administering these non-cognitive and
cognitive assessments, I was able to
evaluate each child as a whole. I was able
...
My three students included two boys and
one girl, who are beginning readers
transitioning on reading CVC words,
consonant...
Dr. Hartman (2010) and Dr. Almasi (2010)
analyze books based on pictures,
information, narrative, and informational
aspec...
 Linguistic
Literacy MatrixNarrative Informational
Semiotic(pictures)
Readabilility
• Linguistic
Narrative Informational
Semiotic (pictures)
Readabilility
Insects by Illa Podendorf
Locus Pocus! A book to bu...
Difficulty of text is measured through multiple characteristics
*Readability: sentence length, concept difficulty, singlet...
Texts selected
 Insects by Illa Podendorf—information
with semiotic and linguistic aspects.
 Locus pocus! A book to bug...
 The literacy matrix guided my selection of books, so that I could
provide an arrangement of books to fulfill the individ...
 Students must learn how to become metacognitive to
help them comprehend text through the five pillars:
 Phonics
 Phone...
 Through the interactive process, students were taught
vocabulary words (greedy, consequences, and regret)
through phonic...
 Together, we read the stories King Midas and His Gold by
Patricia and Fredrick McKissack and in connection to the
holida...
 As a follow up activity, I read The Chocolate Touch
by Patrick Skene Catling to the class. We completed
Venn Diagrams to...
 Critical Perspective provides an opportunity for
students to critically examine a text by evaluating the
believability o...
 Continued work with these students included
using response journals through our book
selection Big Bushy Moustache by Ga...
 Big Bushy Moustache Critical and Responsive Perspectives
 Response journals—I was envious when I wanted my friend’s____...
 What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy
instruction from viewing this presentation.
 How might the infor...
• Nieto (2003) states that learning is
ongoing without end. This is instilled
into my young students’ minds and
continuing...
 Afflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment, k-12. Newark, DE:
International Reading Association.
...
 Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010h). Critical perspective {Webcast}. The
beginning reader, Pre-K-3. B...
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Literate Environment Analysis

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Literate Environment Analysis
Walden University
EDUC 6706R-4 The Beginning Reader, PreK-3
Dr. Denise Love

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Literate Environment Analysis

  1. 1. By Carolina Seibel Walden University EDUC-6706R-4 The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 Dr. Denise Love
  2. 2. Tompkins (2010) describes what teachers do in a literacy enriched classroom:  Balance explicit instruction with authentic application  Integrate reading and writing  Teach with trade books as well as textbooks  Combine instructional approaches  Incorporate new technologies into literacy instruction  Differentiate instruction so every student can succeed.  Link assessment and instruction Incorporating this research-based, balanced approach into my classroom has provided successful results with non-cognitive and cognitive measurements.
  3. 3.  Dr. Almansi (2010) discusses the importance of getting to know your students through activities and Dr. Afflerbach (2010) discusses the use of informal and formal reading inventories.  Combined, these two educators provide powerful advice that will create a sense of community, build trust, and provide critical information to address books of interest and identify cognitive and non- cognitive aspects of literacy in my classroom of children.
  4. 4.  Non-cognitive assessments measure a student’s motivation and attitude towards reading. Students must believe in themselves in order to become successful readers (Afflerbach, 2007).  Rider & Colmar (2008) express a child's academic self-concept as a direct result of their academic success and experiences. "We feel good about ourselves because we do well.“  Henk and Melnick (1995) referred to a national poll that resulted in teachers ranking motivation and creating interest in reading in their students as their first priority.
  5. 5.  Non-cognitive assessments used  ERAS (Elementary Reading Attitude Survey). This survey asks questions about a child's interest about reading books as a recreational activity and as an academic activity.  Observations  Conversations
  6. 6. Cognitive assessments focus on how a child masters literacy skills and strategies as they develop as readers, such as phonemic awareness, phonics, sight word recognition, and fluency (Afflerbach, 2007).
  7. 7.  Cognitive assessments used  EasyCBM, which identifies one minute fluencies in the following areas--phoneme segmentation (sounds heard and broken down in words), letter names, letter sounds, word reading, and passage reading.  Harcourt Weekly Lesson Test provides accurate information in the areas of comprehension, phonics/spelling, high-frequency words, focus skills, and vocabulary, according to our curriculum lessons that week.  CORE Phonics Survey assessment is a direct approach to identifying phonic skills. It identifies any gaps in letter names (upper and lowercase), letter sounds (long and short), and reading and decoding (CVC, blends, digraphs, r-controlled, long vowel, variant vowels, low frequency vowel, and multi- syllabic).
  8. 8. By administering these non-cognitive and cognitive assessments, I was able to evaluate each child as a whole. I was able to identify their motivations, identities, schema, and academic abilities, so that I could address their individual literacy needs through activities, lessons, and texts and create a literate environment.
  9. 9. My three students included two boys and one girl, who are beginning readers transitioning on reading CVC words, consonant blends and practicing fluency. The girl enjoys reading and the boys do not. One boy is on an articulation Speech IEP and the girl is an ELL student. Together, these students have gained confidence, motivation, and academic gains and positive attitudes towards reading.
  10. 10. Dr. Hartman (2010) and Dr. Almasi (2010) analyze books based on pictures, information, narrative, and informational aspects in their relation to readability. Together, a literacy matrix has been created that aligns books on a spectrum that determines their readability through narrative or informational books based on linguistic and semiotic cues.
  11. 11.  Linguistic Literacy MatrixNarrative Informational Semiotic(pictures) Readabilility
  12. 12. • Linguistic Narrative Informational Semiotic (pictures) Readabilility Insects by Illa Podendorf Locus Pocus! A book to bug you By Douglas McKelvey Sophie’s Masterpiece by E. Spinelli
  13. 13. Difficulty of text is measured through multiple characteristics *Readability: sentence length, concept difficulty, singletons *Text length *Text structure: literacy elements *Size of print *Visual supports: graphic organizers and pictures (Laureate Education, Inc., 2011e). Texts should relate to student interests, schema, culture, etc.
  14. 14. Texts selected  Insects by Illa Podendorf—information with semiotic and linguistic aspects.  Locus pocus! A book to bug you by Douglas McKelvey—narrative with semiotic tendencies.  Sophie’s masterpiece by E. Spinelli— narrative with semiotic characteristics.
  15. 15.  The literacy matrix guided my selection of books, so that I could provide an arrangement of books to fulfill the individual needs of my students and activate their schema.  Dr. Richard J. Stiggins (2005) defines performance assessments as students engaging in activities to demonstrate performance of skills or create products based on quality standards as the observers judge based on performances. Through the use of Insects my students created insects with a head, thorax, abdomen, and six legs.  Sophie’s Masterpiece is available from storylineonline.com and these beginning readers were able to use technology and listen to the story so they could follow along and practice fluency.  Other activities included vocabulary ABC dictionaries, rhyming activities, adjective activities, Venn diagrams, and other literacy promoting activities to enhance comprehension.
  16. 16.  Students must learn how to become metacognitive to help them comprehend text through the five pillars:  Phonics  Phonemic Awareness  Comprehension  Fluency  Vocabulary As students practice these five pillars, then they become strategic processors and thinkers (Laureate Education, 2010g)
  17. 17.  Through the interactive process, students were taught vocabulary words (greedy, consequences, and regret) through phonics applications and word analysis skills in order to decode words through repeated reading to gain accuracy, fluency, expression, and comprehension.  Together, we read the stories King Midas and His Gold by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack and in connection to the holiday season, we watched Dr. Seuss’How the Grinch Stole Christmas.  After having discussions about each vocabulary word, sentence frames were used to promote writing, such as, “I regret____, because it hurt my_____feelings.
  18. 18.  Together, we read the stories King Midas and His Gold by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack and in connection to the holiday season, we watched Dr. Seuss’How the Grinch Stole Christmas.  After having discussions about each vocabulary word, sentence frames were used to promote writing, such as, “I regret____, because it hurt my_____feelings.” and “I felt regret when I ____, and my consequence was____.” “I was greedy when I wanted ______all to myself and I didn’t want to share!”  These activities and using kinesthetic motion to act out the words greedy (jumping up and down yelling mine, mine, mine!) and consequences (pointing fingers and shaking head no) and regret (sad faces and saying sorry) were all activities that promoted the interactive perspective.
  19. 19.  As a follow up activity, I read The Chocolate Touch by Patrick Skene Catling to the class. We completed Venn Diagrams to compare and contrast King Midas’ story, which promotes student comprehension, especially when readability is difficult (Laureate Education, 2010g).  In order to ensure vocabulary and technology enrichment, I created an Activotes assessment through the Promethean Board and assessed students on their recollection of the vocabulary words-greedy, consequences, and regret. All participants earned 100%.
  20. 20.  Critical Perspective provides an opportunity for students to critically examine a text by evaluating the believability of texts and how students think about texts while reading, such as an author’s purpose (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010h).  Dr Vacca (2010) discusses the importance of incorporating writing into reading. He provides examples of response journals and double-entry journals. Writing allows students to absorb complex perspectives and relate them to their schema (Laureate Education, 2010k).
  21. 21.  Continued work with these students included using response journals through our book selection Big Bushy Moustache by Gary Soto and illustrated by Joe Cepeda. We reviewed the vocabulary word, envious, as we discussed times we wanted to be someone or have something that did not belong to us. These are two conflicts that happen in the story. A boy wanting to be like his father and taking a costume moustache home from school.
  22. 22.  Big Bushy Moustache Critical and Responsive Perspectives  Response journals—I was envious when I wanted my friend’s_______. This reinforced a previously taught vocabulary word and allowed students to personally respond to the story.  Author’s Purpose—We read an excerpt about Gary Soto using his neighborhood to help him create his stories. The story has Spanish speaking characters, so we discussed diversity and cultures and his purpose of incorporating his culture into his story. We also discussed the illustrator, Joe Cepeda, and how he illustrates himself and his family in the background of the story too. We discussed that they are both of Latino decent.  Molden (2007) provides a table of critical perspective questions to provoke literacy discussions, so I used the question, “What sort of genre does this text belong to?” Together we confirmed that it is a realistic fiction piece.  As a family connection, I asked that families watch The Parent Trap, either the 1961 or 1998 version. We discussed who we wished we could be for a day and students shared their response journals with their families. Together families can compare and contrast the movies and story and share their envious experiences during their childhood.
  23. 23.  What insights did you gain about literacy and literacy instruction from viewing this presentation.  How might the information presented change your literacy practices and/or your literacy interactions with students?  In what ways can I support you in the literacy development of your students or children? How might you support me in my work with students or your children?  What questions do you have?
  24. 24. • Nieto (2003) states that learning is ongoing without end. This is instilled into my young students’ minds and continuing my education encourages them, nourishes my lifelong love of learning, and helps me become the best teacher I can be!
  25. 25.  Afflerbach, P. (2007). Understanding and using reading assessment, k-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.  Henk, W. A., & Melnick, S. A. (1995). The reader self-perception scale (rsps): A new tool for measuring how children feel about themselves as readers. Reading Teacher, 48(6), 470. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Changes in literacy{Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). The Beginning Reader{Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Getting to know your students. Knowledge{Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010d). VFE: strategic processing {Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010e). Analyzing and Selecting Text. {Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010f). Informational Text. {Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010g).Strategic processing: Interactive perspective {Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.
  26. 26.  Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010h). Critical perspective {Webcast}. The beginning reader, Pre-K-3. Baltimore, MD: Author.  McKenna, M.C. & Kear, D.J. (1990, May). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43 (9),j 626-639. http://www.professorgarfield.org/parents_teachers/printables/pdfs/reading/readingsurv ey.pdf  Nieto, S. (2003). What keeps teachers going? New York: Teachers College Press.  Rider, N., & Colmar, S. (n.d.). Reading achievement and reading self-concept in year 3 children. Retrieved November 18, 2008, from http://www.aare.edu.au/05pap/col05347.pdf  Stiggins, R. J. (2005). Student-involved assessment for learning (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.  Tompkins, G.E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balanced approach. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

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