Engaging Activities forActive Learning                Amy Baldwin             Pulaski Technical College               Stev...
T                                   A                                   B                                   L             ...
Learning Through the Eight Intelligences Identifying My DominantIntelligence Personality TypingThe Career Checklist       ...
•                            551                                                     The National Student Success Institut...
SI                                                           The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY...
Activity Sheet:                                 Learning Through the Eight IntelligencesDirections: Using the information ...
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The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Identifying My Dominant Intelligence*Purpose: The purpose o...
Activity Sheet.Identifying My Dominant Intelligence: The MIS Assessment                                     Robert M. Sher...
18. I have a good memory for names and dates.19. When I hear music, I "get into it" by moving, humming, tapping, or even s...
Refer to your score on each individual question. Place that score beside the appropriatequestion number below. Then, tally...
SI                                                            The National Student Success Institute                      ...
Activity Sheet:                                     Personality Typing: The PAP Assessment                                ...
9a. I like to express my feelings and thoughts.__________ 911       enjoy a great deal of tranquility and quiet time to my...
Refer to your score on each individual question. Place that score beside the appropriatequestion number below. Then, tally...
NSSI                                                           The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVI...
Activity Sheet:                                                                                   The Career ChecklistDire...
FEELING: _________________________________________________________________________________JUDGING: _______________________...
NS_ SI                                                             The National Student Success Institute)Active LearningA...
Activity Sheet:                                                           My Personal Life ProfileAfter you have discovere...
Activity Sheet:                                           My Personal Life ProfileTHE PERSONAL LIFE PROFILE OFAcademic Str...
Communication Challenges: I found that L..Relationship Strengths: I found that L. ________________________________________...
Relationship Challenges: 1 found that L. _______________________________________Career Strengths: I found that 1...Career ...
Financial Management Strengths: I found thatFinancial Management Challenges: I found that 1... ___________________________...
The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: A Model of Active Learning*Purpose: The purpose of A Model ...
Activity Sheet:                                                                                 Model of Active Learning  ...
SSI                                                               The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACT...
Activity Sheet:                        Active Learning = Remembering = RetainingDirections: Copy this sheet and the follow...
Active Learning = Remembering = Retaining1. Place or write the appropriate boxes from the previous page in the columns pro...
ANSWER KEY                                                                Additional                                      ...
NSSI                                                               The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningAC...
Activity Sheet:                                            Technology Does Not Improve Teaching*                          ...
Technology Does Not Improve TeachingDirections: Read the article on the previous page by a senior journalism major who has...
SI                                                           The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY...
Activity Sheet.                                                     VARK Learning PreferencesVARK Learning Styles Activity...
VARK Learning Styles Activity                                                  Group Kinesthetic (K)                      ...
VARK Learning Styles ActivityGroup Multimodal (MM)Members of the Group (including yourself):Name                          ...
VARK Learning Styles Activity                                                 Group Visual (V)                            ...
The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Tapping into EmotionsPurpose: The purpose of Tapping into E...
Activity Sheet:                                                           Tapping into EmotionsDirections: The following a...
3. EMOTION: EXCITEMENT A. TYPICAL SITUATION: You find out that you won a scholarship that will pay for books, tuition,and ...
SI                                                              The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIV...
Activity Sheet.                                                Reflecting on Your Learning Style*There are no "right" answ...
6. Did you perform better when instructors clearly mapped the exact steps you had to follow to   complete a task?         ...
SI                                                              The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIV...
Activity Sheet:                                                      How Do You Learn Best?*Auditory. Describe a recent cl...
*Rhythms of College Success: A Journey of Discovery, Change, and Mastery. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: PearsonEducation, 200...
The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Prioritizing Your Intelligences*Purpose: Knowledge of learn...
Activity Sheet  Background Information: Understanding Multiple Intelligences*Howard Gardner, a Harvard professor, did pion...
Intrapersonal intelligence (me smart). You understand yourself and can apply thatknowledge in real-life situations to prod...
Activity Sheet:                                                            Prioritize Your Intelligences*List the intellig...
The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Multiple Intelligences—Majors and Careers*Purpose: Multiple...
Activity Sheet:                                      Multiple Intelligences—Majors and Careers*Collaborate with a classmat...
The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners?Purpose:...
Activity Sheet:      How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners?Lets assume you have to find a study partner by th...
What steps will you take to approach these people to be your peer study partners? When willyou do it? Write these steps be...
Follow-up to How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners?                 How effective and beneficial has your stu...
Active learning
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Active learning

  1. 1. Engaging Activities forActive Learning Amy Baldwin Pulaski Technical College Steve Piscitelli Florida Community College-Jacksonville Robert Sherfield The College of Southern Nevada
  2. 2. T A B L E O F C O N T E N Page 1 T S Pages 2-3 Pages 4-7 Pages 8-11Active Learning: An Introduction Pages 12-13 Pages 14-17 Pages 18-19 Pages 20-23 Pages 24-26 Pages 27-31 Pages 32-34 Pages 35-37 Pages 38-39 Pages 40-43 Pages 44-45 Pages 46-48
  3. 3. Learning Through the Eight Intelligences Identifying My DominantIntelligence Personality TypingThe Career Checklist My Personal Life ProfilePlanning & Activity Sheet: A Model of Active LearningPlanning &Activity Sheet: Active Learning = Remembering = RetainingPlanning &Activity Sheet: Technology Does Not Improve TeachingPlanning &Activity Sheet: VARK Learning PreferencesPlanning &Activity Sheet:Planning & Activity Sheet: Tapping into EmotionsPlanning & Activity Sheet: Reflecting on Your Learning StylePlanning &Activity Sheet: How Do You Learn Best?Planning & Activity Sheet: Prioritizing Your IntelligencesPlanning &Activity Sheet: Multiple Intelligences—Majors and CareersPlanning & Activity Sheet: How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners?Planning &Activity Sheet:Planning &Activity Sheet:Planning & Activity Sheet:Planning &Activity Sheet:
  4. 4. • 551 The National Student Success InstituteACTIVE LEARNING:An IntroductionThe phrase "sage on the stage" was once a compliment to any professor who lectured toa group of eager, attentive students. Now the phrase identifies professors who have notembraced the active learning movement. Active learning, a mainstay in elementary education,has found its way to the college classroom, but not without its detractors and not without someexplanation and training for those whose own college days were spent listening and quietlytaking notes during class. Simply put, active learning describes any teaching or learningstrategy that requires more of students than listening passively. With active learning, theymay be applying information in new contexts, conducting experiments, devising instrumentsto collect data, writing the results of their own learning, or teaching a group of students whatthey know about a subject. The goal with active learning is to engage the student in learningactivities and make him or her responsible for what is retained.This booklet contains assignments, procedural information, and activities that you can use withyour students immediately. Before each activity you will find the following information to helpyou plan a lesson: Purpose of the activity Objective of the activity Time needed to complete the activity Resources required to complete the activity Procedures or steps to complete the activity Activity worksheetsWe hope you will find these activities as useful as we have with our students.All materials in this booklet are copyrighted by the authors but may be used by participants ofThe National Student Success Institute workshops. These activities are to be used for directstudent instruction only. Materials cannot be sold or otherwise used for profit. Please provideproper citation when using the material.All the best for student success,Amy, Steve, and Robb
  5. 5. SI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Learning Through the Eight Intelligences*Purpose: From time to time, we have students who simply do not or cannot grasp a concept or a theoryor understand a poem or a piece of symbolism. This may be due, in part, to the fact that they have neverheard of and do not understand the eight intelligences and the roles they play in helping us comprehendand retain information. This exercise will allow students to spend time learning each intelligence.Learning Objectives: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: sf Identify the eight intelligences  Discuss how each intelligence can help them learn more effectively 7 ,7 Identify their own dominant intelligenceEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 30-45 minutes.Materials Needed: Learning Through the Eight Intelligences activity sheetProcedure: Find a piece of subject matter that you would like to have your students explore throughthe eight intelligences. If your area is math, perhaps you will select a theory or word problem. If your areais English, perhaps you will select a poem or a short piece of literature. If your area is engineering, youmay select a problem-solving example. Have your students get into groups of three or four. Give them the information that you would likethem to explore. You may even want to have them take it home to read and study in detail before you tellthem about this exercise. After they have grouped together and studied the material, have them come upwith at least two ways through each of the eight intelligences to teach this information to the class. Theycan record their answers on the worksheet. For example, if you selected a poem, your student groups will have to decide two ways to teachthis piece through the eight intelligences, such as:Verbal / Linguistic Have someone in the class who has a dynamic voice read the poem several times. Have groups of students discuss the poem in detail. Have them select words from the poem that are not familiar and define those words.Visual / Spatial Have students draw an interpretation of the poem on poster board. Have students act out the poem using body language only, no words.Additional Readings / Resources:Books: Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons. Gardner, H. 2008 Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, 2nd Edition, Armstrong, T. 2000*10 Cornerstone: Creating Success Through Positive Change, 6th Edition. Sherfield, R., and Moody, P. Boston, MAPearson Education, 2011. 2
  6. 6. Activity Sheet: Learning Through the Eight IntelligencesDirections: Using the information provided by your professor, identify at least two ways througheach intelligence to teach this information to the class.VISUAL/SPATIAL: (picture smart) __________________________________________________________________________VERBAL/LINGUISTIC: (word smart) _____________________________________________________________________MUSICAL/RHYTHM: (music smart) ______________________________________________________________________LOGIC/MATH: (number smart) ______________________________________________________________________________BODY/KINESTHETIC: (body smart) ______________________________________________________________________INTERPERSONAL: (people smart) ________________________________________________________________________INTRAPERSONAL: (self smart) _________________________________________________________________________NATURALISTIC: (environment smart) ________________________________________________________________________
  7. 7. 3
  8. 8. The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Identifying My Dominant Intelligence*Purpose: The purpose of Identifying My Dominant Intelligence is to help students identify whichof the eight intelligences is most dominant in their lives. Further, this activity willopen a discussion about how students can apply their most dominant intelligence to theiracademic lives and how they can strengthen their least dominant intelligences.Learning Objectives: At the end of this activity, students will be able to:  Identify their most dominant intelligence  Identify their least dominant intelligence  Discuss how their intelligences play a role in their academic, cultural, and social successesEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 30minutes.Materials Needed: Identifying My Dominant Intelligence activity sheetProcedure: Give each student a copy of the MIS Assessment. Give them some time tocomplete and self-score the assessment. Afterwards, open a discussion aboutthe intelligences and have each student report on his/her most dominant and least dominantintelligence.Additional Readings / Resources:Books: Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons Gardner, H. 2008Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, 2nd Edition Armstrong, T. 2000The Best of Multiple Intelligence Activities Teacher Created Resources. 2004Teaching and Learning Through the Multiple Intelligences Campbell, L., et al. 2003V Cornerstone: Creating Success Through Positive Change, 6th Edition. Sheffield, R., and Moody, P. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2011. 4
  9. 9. Activity Sheet.Identifying My Dominant Intelligence: The MIS Assessment Robert M. Sherfiekt, Ph.D., 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008Directions: Read each statement carefully and thoroughly. After reading the statement, rateyour response using the scale below. There are no right or wrong answers. This is not a timedsurvey. The MIS is based, in part, on Frames of Mind by Howard Gardner, 1983.3 = Often Applies2 = Sometimes Applies1 = Never or Almost Never Applies_______ 1. When someone gives me directions, I have to visualize them in my mind in order to understand them._____ 2. I enjoy crossword puzzles and word games like Scrabble._____ 3. I enjoy dancing and can keep up with the beat of music._____ 4. I have little or no trouble conceptualizing information or facts._____ 5. I like to repair things that are broken such as toasters, small engines, bicycles, and cars._____ 6. 1 enjoy leadership activities on campus and in the community,_____ 7. I have the ability to get others to listen to me._____ 8. I enjoy working with nature, animals, and plants,____ 9, 1 know where everything is in my home such as supplies, gloves, flashlights, camera, and compact discs._____ 10. I am a good speller._____ 11. I often sing or hum to myself in the shower or car, or while walking or just sitting._____ 12. 1 am a very logical, orderly thinker.____ 13. I use a lot of gestures when I talk to people._____ 14. I can recognize and empathize with peoples attitudes and emotions._____ 15. I prefer to study alone.____ 16. I can name many different things in the environment such as clouds, rocks, and plant types._____ 17. I like to draw pictures, graphs, or charts to better understand information. 5
  10. 10. 18. I have a good memory for names and dates.19. When I hear music, I "get into it" by moving, humming, tapping, or even singing.20. I learn better by asking a lot of questions.21. I enjoy playing competitive sports.22. I communicate very well with other people.23. I know what I want and I set goals to accomplish it.24. I have some interest in herbal remedies and natural medicine.25. I enjoy working puzzles or mazes,26, I am a good storyteller.27. I can easily remember the words and melodies of songs.28. I enjoy solving problems in math and chemistry and working with computer programming problems.29. I usually touch people or pat them on the back when I talk to them.30. I understand my family and friends better than most other people do.31. I dont always talk about my accomplishments with others.32. I would rather work outside around nature than inside around people and equipment,33. I enjoy and learn more when seeing movies, slides, or videos in class.34. I am a very good listener and I enjoy listening to others stories,35. I need to study with music.36. I enjoy games like Clue, Battleship, chess, and Rubiks Cube.37. I enjoy physical activities such as bicycling, jogging, dancing, snowboarding, skateboarding, or swimming.38. I am good at solving peoples problems and conflicts.39. I have to have time alone to think about new information in order to remember it.40. I enjoy sorting and organizing information, objects, and collectibles. 6
  11. 11. Refer to your score on each individual question. Place that score beside the appropriatequestion number below. Then, tally each line at the side. TOTAL SCORE ACROSS CODE 1 9 17 25 33 Visual/Spatial 2 10 18 26 34 Verbal/Linguistic 3 11 19 27 35 Musical/Rhythm 4 12 20 28 36 Logic/Math 5 13 21 29 37 Body/Kinesthetic 6 14 22 30 38 Interpersonal 7 15 23 31- 39 Intrapersonal 8 16 24 32 40 NaturalisticMIS TALLYMultiple IntelligencesLook at the scores on the MIS. What are your top three scores? Write them in the space below. Top Score _________ Code ________________ Second Score _______ Code _________________ Third Score __________ Code ________________This tally can help you understand where some of your strengthsmay be. Again, this is not a measure of your worth or capacities, nor is it an indicator of yourfuture successes. Go online and read more about your specific intelligence or multipleintelligences in general. 7
  12. 12. SI The National Student Success Institute , „ „Active LearningACTIVITY: Personality Typing*Purpose: The purpose of Personality Typing is to help students identify their personality codebased on the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator®. This activity will also lead to a good discussion abouthow personality plays a role in our career successes, academic studies, and relationshipdevelopment.Learning Objectives: At the end of this activity, students will be able to:  Identify their personality type Discuss how this personality type affects decisions  Identify careers associated with this personality typeEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 30-45 minutes.Materials Needed: Personality Typing activity sheet Myers-Briggs® Indicator Interpretation Booklet (optional)Procedure: Give each student a copy of the PAP Assessment. After they have had time toanswer the questions and self-score the assessment, open a discussion about the results. Youcan also have students grouped together depending on each personality type andhave them complete a project or discuss an issue together. Then, have each group discuss theissue before class to show how differently each type may have perceived the issue or problem. Additional Readings / Resources:Books: Pictures of Personality: Guide to the Four Human Natures Lopker, J. 2001 The Sixteen Personality Types: Descriptions for Self-Discovery Berens, L., &Nardi, D. 1999 The Dynamics of Personality Type: Understanding and Applying Jungs Cognitive Process Berens, L. 2000*CD Cornerstone: Creating Success Through Positive Change, 6th Edition. Sherfield, R., and Moody, P. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2011. 8
  13. 13. Activity Sheet: Personality Typing: The PAP Assessment © Robert M. Sherfield, Ph.D., 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008Directions: Read each statement carefully and thoroughly. After reading the statement, rateyour response using the scale below. There are no right or wrong answers. This is not a timedsurvey. The PAP is based, in part, on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI) by KatharineBriggs and Isabel Briggs-Myers.3 = Often Applies2 .= Sometimes Applies = Never or Almost Never Applies Ia. I am a very talkative person. lb. I am a more reflective person than a verbal person, 2a. I am a very factual and literal person. 2b. F look to the future and I can see possibilities. 3a. I value truth and justice over tact and emotion. 3b. I find it easy to empathize with other people. 4a. I am very ordered and efficient. 4b. I enjoy having freedom from control. 5a. I am a very friendly and social person. 5b. I enjoy listening to others more than talking. 6a. I enjoy being around and working with people who have a great deal of common sense. 6b. I enjoy being around and working with people who are dreamers and have a great deal of imagination._____ 7a. One of my motivating forces is to do a job very well. 7b. I like to be recognized for, and I am motivated by, my accomplishments and awards. 8a. I like to plan out my day before 190 to bed._____ 8b, When I get up on a non-school or non-work day, I just like to let the day "plan itself." 9
  14. 14. 9a. I like to express my feelings and thoughts.__________ 911 enjoy a great deal of tranquility and quiet time to myself._______ 10a. I am a very pragmatic and realistic person._______ 10b. I like to create new ideas, methods, or ways of doing things. 11a. I make decisions with my brain._______ 1111 I make decisions with my heart._______ 12a. 1 am a very disciplined and orderly person._______ 12b. I dont make a lot of plans._______ 13a. I like to work with a group of people._______ 13b. I would rather work independently._______ 14a. I learn best if I can see it, touch it, smell it, taste it, or hear it._______ 14b. I learn best by relying on my gut feelings or intuition._______ 15a. I am quick to criticize others._______ 15b. I compliment others very easily and quickly._______ 16a. My life is systematic and organized._______ 16b. I dont really pay attention to deadlines._______ 17a. I can be myself when I am around others._______ 17b. [can be myself when I am alone._______ 18a. I live in the here and now, in the present._______ 18b. I live in the future, planning and dreaming._______ 19a. I think that if someone breaks the rules, the person should be punished._______ 19b. I think that if someone breaks the rules, we should look at the person who broke the rules, examine the rules, and look at the situation at hand before a decision is made._______ 20a. I do my work, then I play._______ 20b. I play, then do my work.
  15. 15. Refer to your score on each individual question. Place that score beside the appropriatequestion number below. Then, tally each line at the side. TOTAL ACROSS CODE SCORE la 5a 9a 13a 17a E Extrovert lb 5b 9b 13b 17b I Introvert 2a 6a 10a 14a 18a S Sensing 10b 14b 18b N iNtuition 2b 6b 3a 7a 11a 15a 19a T Thinking lib 15b 19b F Feeling 3b 7b 4a 8a 12a 16a 20a J Judging 20b ___ 4b___ 8b _ 12b __ 16b__ P PerceivingPAP SCORESPersonality IndicatorLook at the scores on your PAP. Is your score higher in the E or I line? Is your score higher inthe S or N line? Is your score higher in the T or F line? Is your score higher in the J or P line?Write the code to the side of each section below. Is your higher score EorI Code _______ Is your higher score SorN Code _______ Is your higher score TorF Code _______ Is your higher score J or P Code _______ 11
  16. 16. NSSI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: The Career Checklist*Purpose: The purpose of The Career Checklist is to help students identify whichcareers may be best suited for each personality type and why. This activity can also open adiscussion about each students major and help determine if his/her major "fits" with his/herpersonality type.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: ,/ Identify several careers associated with each personality type ,/ Identify if his/her personality type is best suited to his/her majorEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually takes approximately 45-60 minutes.Materials Needed: The Career Checklist activity sheetProcedure: Using the following sheet, have groups of students spend some time identifyingcareers that they feel would be suited to the eight personality types. After they have had timeto work on the sheet, have them discuss how and why they made their decisions. If some of the careers indicated are highly stereotypical, this would be a great opportunity totalk about the negative effects of stereotyping, prejudging, and drawing unfair conclusions.Additional Readings / Resources:Books: Pictures of Personality: Guide to the Four Human Natures Lopker, J. 2001The Sixteen Personality Types: Descriptions for Self-Discovery Berens, L., &Nardi, D. 1999The Dynamics of Personality Type: Understanding and Applying Jungs Cognitive ProcessBerens, L. 2000 Cornerstone: Creating Success Through Positive Change, 6th Edition. Sherfield, R., and Moody, P. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2011. 12
  17. 17. Activity Sheet: The Career ChecklistDirections: Below you will find listed the eight personality types. Beside each type, make a list of careers that thispersonality type might enjoy and find rewarding.EXTROVERT: ______________________________________________________________________________INTROVERT: _______________________________________________________________________________SENSING: _________________________________________________________________________________INTUITIVE: ________________________________________________________________________________THINKING: _________________________________________________________________________________
  18. 18. FEELING: _________________________________________________________________________________JUDGING: _________________________________________________________________________________PERCEIVING: ______________________________________________________________________________ 13
  19. 19. NS_ SI The National Student Success Institute)Active LearningACTIVITY: My Personal Life Profile*Purpose: The purpose of My Personal Life Profile helps students learn how their personalitytypes, learning styles, and dominant intelligences play a role in their daily lives, academic successesand challenges, relationships, etc. This activity will ask students to look at their dominantintelligences, personality types, and learning styles and apply them to everyday situations.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: ,/ Apply their most dominant intelligences, learning styles, and personality types to everyday situations V Discuss ways to improve their study habits, relationships, etc. through the Life ProfileEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 45-60 minutes.Materials Needed: My Personal Life Profile activity sheetProcedure: Give each student a copy of the My Personal Life Profile activity sheet. Explain tothem the importance of being able to apply their dominant intelligence, learning style, andpersonality type to a variety of situations for optimum success. They can do this activity as acooperative learning team or alone, but it will be beneficial to have an open discussion regardingtheir findings.Additional Readings / Resources:Books: Pictures of Personality: Guide to the Four Human Natures Lopker, J. 2001 The Sixteen Personality Types: Descriptions for Self-Discovery Berens, L., & Nardi, D. 1999 The Dynamics of Personality Type: Understanding and Applying Jungs Cognitive Process Berens, L. 2000*CI Cornerstone: Creating Success Through Positive Change, 6th Edition. Sherfield, R., and Moody, P. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2011. 14
  20. 20. Activity Sheet: My Personal Life ProfileAfter you have discovered your most dominant intelligence, your learning style, and yourpersonality type, jot them down in the space below:My dominant intelligence isMy learning style is ______My personality type is ____Now that you see them all together, think of them as a puzzle and you need to "connect thedots." In other words, put them all together and what do they look like? What do they mean?How do they affect your studies, your relationships, your communication skills, and your careerchoices?Example: If Mikes dominant intelligence is interpersonal, his learning style is verbal and hispersonality type is ENFJ, connecting the dots may suggest that he is the type of person wholoves to be around other people. He is an extrovert who learns best by listening to other peopleor explaining how something is done. He is a person who would probably speak out in class,be more of a leader than a follower, and someone who would start a study group if one didnot exist because he is outgoing, organized, and a goal setter. Mike values relationships andlistens to what others are saying. He is a person who shares and does not mind taking the timeto explain things to others. He could easily become a good friend.Some of the challenges Mike could encounter might involve taking a class where discussionsare rare, having to sit and never share ideas or views, or having a professor who is not veryorganized and skips around. He would not deal very well with peers who are disrespectful anddid not pull their own weight in the study group. He might also have a hard time with groupmembers or classmates who are very quiet and prefer to observe rather than become involved.He would have trouble being around people who have no goals and direction in life. He mightalso run into some trouble because he is a very social person and loves to be around others insocial settings. Therefore, he may over-commit himself to groups and clubs and on occasion,he may socialize more than study.As you can see, by connecting to dots, Mikes Personal Life Profile tells us a great deal abouthis strengths and challenges. It also gives him an understanding of how to approach manydifferent situations.Now it is your turn. Take your time and refer to your chapter for any information you may need.Examine your assessments and create your own profile in the four areas listed on the nextpage. Discuss your strengths and challenges for each area. 15
  21. 21. Activity Sheet: My Personal Life ProfileTHE PERSONAL LIFE PROFILE OFAcademic Strengths: I found thatI...Academic Challenges: I found that I...Communication Strengths: I found that I_
  22. 22. Communication Challenges: I found that L..Relationship Strengths: I found that L. ____________________________________________ 16
  23. 23. Relationship Challenges: 1 found that L. _______________________________________Career Strengths: I found that 1...Career Challenges: I found that 1... _______________________________________________________ 17
  24. 24. Financial Management Strengths: I found thatFinancial Management Challenges: I found that 1... _______________________________________
  25. 25. The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: A Model of Active Learning*Purpose: The purpose of A Model of Active Learning is to allow students the opportunity towork through the process of one model of active learning: dialogue with self, dialogue with others,experience of observing, and experience of doing.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: V Describe four active learning activities and how they are related V Apply active learning to other experiencesEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 15-20 minutes.Materials Needed: A Model of Active Learning activity sheetProcedure: Before you begin the activity, discuss the four stages of active learning that areused in this activity: dialogue with self, dialogue with others, experience of observing, andexperience of doing. Students may be interested to know that with each activity, starting withdialogue with self and ending with doing, their retention of the material gets greater. Depending onyour own discipline, you may want to substitute the underlined words in the activity with anotheractivity that students can learn to do. For example, for a nutrition class, calculating nutritional valuemay be an activity that could replace writing an essay.Additional Readings / Resources:Books/Resources: Using Active Learning in College Classes: A Range of Options for Faculty Sutherland, T. &C. Bonwell, 1996*Adapted from L. Dee Fink, University of Oklahoma Instructional Development Program. Retrieved from http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/active.htm 18
  26. 26. Activity Sheet: Model of Active Learning EXPERIENCE OF: DI AL O G UE W I TH SELFFrom L. Dee Fink, University of Oklahoma Instructional Development Program. Retrieved fromhttp://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/cornmittees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtipiactive.htmLearning How to Write an Essay for an Exam Active Learning Activity Your Experience Dialogue with Self: Take 5 minutes to write about your experience with writing an essay for an exam; if you have not experienced writing an essay for an exam, then write about any experience you have with writing. Dialogue with Others: Take 5 minutes to talk to your classmate about writing an essay for an exam. Write down what your classmate has experienced in writing an - essay for an exam. Experience of Observing: Listen to your professor demonstrate how to write an essay for an exam. This will take 15-20 minutes. Write down your observations. Experience of Doing Take the remaining 15-20 minutes and write an essay for an exam based on a topic your professor has assigned. 19
  27. 27. SSI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Active Learning = Remembering = Retaining*Purpose: The purpose of Active Learning = Remembering = Retaining is to demonstrate theconnection between actively learning and remembering and retaining what has been learned overtime.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to:  Define active learning  Draw correlations between the type of learning and the amount of information that is retained  Develop strategies for actively learning in all educational environmentsEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 30-45 minutes.Materials Needed: Active Learning = Remembering = Retaining activity sheetProcedure: Discuss the connection between active learning and remembering/retaininginformation by talking about classes students have had in the past. Many people refer to thecommon belief that we retain 10% of what we hear; 30% of what we see; 50% of what we watch,see, and hear; 70% of what we figure out on our own or do ourselves; and 90% of what we doourselves and teach others to do. Discuss the reasons behind these statistics and ask students tocomplete the sheet by recording the types of experiences that would fall in each category andthen by determining what kinds of strategies will help them retain more in different types ofclasses.Additional Readings / Resources:Books/Resources: Collaborative Learning Techniques Barkley, E. et al., 2004*Activity adapted from this website: http://ipcl.c1pccd.cc.ca.us/fpc/hanna/learning/activelearning.htm 20
  28. 28. Activity Sheet: Active Learning = Remembering = RetainingDirections: Copy this sheet and the following one for each student and ask everyone to cutout each block. They will classify each block according to the categories provided. If they areunable to cut out the blocks, they can rewrite each block on the answer sheet provided. Experiential learning 30% of what you see 10% of what you Student groups and hear tutoring Interactive Lab courses Standard teaching Standard teaching presentation model model with a little variation, usually depends on if the discipline is visual Active The student explains Beginning to get The most you can active get during a lecture class Verbal lecture Passive Very active 50% of what you watch, hear, see Very passive 70% of what you Verbal lecture with 90% of what you figure out and do visual aids (e.g., figure out and PowerPoint slides) verbalize 21
  29. 29. Active Learning = Remembering = Retaining1. Place or write the appropriate boxes from the previous page in the columns provided. Additional Information How Passive Specific about Example What You Remember or Active? Example 2. With a classmate or a small group, write down three strategies for remembering, retaining, and learning information in the following types of classes. Very passive: Passive: Beginning to get active: 22
  30. 30. ANSWER KEY Additional Information How Passive Specific about ExampleWhat You Remember or Active? Example Very passive Verbal lecture10% of what you Standard teachinghear model30% of what you see Passive Verbal lecture with Standard teaching visual aids (e.g., model with a little PowerPoint slides) variation, usually depends on if the discipline is visual50% of what you Beginning to get Interactive The most you can getwatch, hear, see active presentation during a lecture class Active Lab courses Experiential learning 70% of what you figure out and do Very active Student groups and The student explains90% of what you tutoringfigure out andverbalize 23
  31. 31. NSSI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Technology Does Not ImproveTeaching*Purpose: The purpose of Technology Does Not Improve Teaching is to provide a situation inwhich even a well-meaning professor confuses and frustrates the students. Students can thenevaluate better solutions that can be used to incorporate technology in the classroom ANDpromote student learning.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: Understand the challenges of technology in the classroom Identify ways that technology can enhance student learning both in and out of the classroom Appreciate the challenges that can arise with the use of technologyEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 30minutes.Materials Needed: An article about the use of technology in the classroom or a list oftechnology used in the classroom. This could be generated by the students or ahead of time.Procedure: Allow students to read the short article first and then ask students to describewhat they read. Use this article as a platform to brainstorm all the possible things thatcould go wrong when faculty use technology in the classroom. Direct students to complete theactivity sheet with instructions to create a "best scenario" for using technology in the classroom.Additional Readings / Resources:Books: Using Technology in the Classroom Bitter, G., & Legacy, J. 2007*Activity adapted from http://1pcl.clpccd.00.ca.us/Ipc/hanna/learning/activelearning.htm 24
  32. 32. Activity Sheet: Technology Does Not Improve Teaching* Technology Does Not Improve Teaching Sue Davis / Guest Columnist October 22, 2004 Source. CSUN Daily Sundial Retrieved from http://www.csun.edu/science/ref/pedagogy/active-passive/powerpoint_abuse.htm This is my first semester with teachers who use PowerPoint in every class, and eight weeks into the semester, I am ready to start screaming like someone in Eminems "Just Lose It" video. I know it seems like a cool technology at first glance. No writing on the board, no flipping overhead transparencies around until they read correctly. In practice, it turns out to be just one more thing standing in the way of teachers engaging students in meaningful learning. Here is how it goes: The lights dim, the teacher fools around with the laptop for a while, and then the show begins. The first slide pops up with a bunch of text, sometimes with cool animated transformation effects. The instructor either reads the text or reads it and elaborates on it a little. Then they try to move on to the next slide, saying "It isnt important to copy down the whole thing, just get the gist of it," but there are always those obsessive-compulsive students who cant help themselves. They just have to copy every word. So, they beg for the teacher to leave the slide up longer, writing furiously, while everyone else sits there, bored. One of my instructors just copies and pastes text straight from the textbook. If he uses examples, they always come from the book, too. So, I bring my highlighter and book to class and madly page through the chapter, finding the text shown on the slide, so I can highlight it. It keeps me following along, but it isnt exactly challenging my intellectual capabilities to their utmost. Another professor makes PowerPoint presentations of such stunning length and complexity that it is invariably thirty seconds before the class is over before she shouts "Any questions?" over the din of people packing their backpacks and leaving. Of course, there arent any questions at that point, and everyone in the class is completely lost. When one brave student finally admitted as much, and everyone else agreed, the instructor said, "But the information was all there!" Yes, it was all there. It just didnt get to us, and she didnt notice because she was too busy getting though the presentation instead of actually teaching. I long for the old days when the instructor would write on the board. Then they would at least move around, write some things large, draw diagrams, underline for emphasis and look around the classroom as they talked. At times, they would even call on students! Interacting with students? How crazy is that? Can we go back to those days? Because this PowerPoint thing sucks. It doesnt make good teachers any better, and it makes poor teachers really stink. Im ready for December already.*From L. Dee Fink, University of Oklahoma Instructional Development Program. Retrieved from http://honolulu.hawaii.eduantranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/active.htm 25
  33. 33. Technology Does Not Improve TeachingDirections: Read the article on the previous page by a senior journalism major who hasissues with professors who use technology. Then, answer the questions below.1. What are your experiences with professors using technology in the classroom? Are they positive or negative or a combination of both?2. In your view, what mistakes do professors make when using technology in the classroom to help students learn?3. What advice could you give professors who use technology, such as PowerPoint slides, to help them improve student learning?4. Describe the best active learning experience that would include the use of technology in the classroom (by either the professor, the students, or both) and the use of technology outside of the classroom to study and retain the information, 26
  34. 34. SI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: VARK Learning Preferences*Purpose: The purpose of VARK Learning Preferences is to allow students an opportunityto learn more about how they prefer to learn in certain situations.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to:  Identify their VARK learning style preference  Use their learning style preference to complete a task  Reflect on the ease or difficulty of completing a task that matches or does not match their learning style preferenceEstimated Time Requirement: The inventory will take about 15-20 minutes to answerand score. Some time will be needed to discuss the different learning styles preferences:Visual, Aural, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic and how they may affect students learningpreferences. The activity will take 20-30 minutes, depending on group dynamics andmotivation to complete.Materials Needed: VARK Learning Preferences activity sheet and the VARK learningstyles inventory available at http://www.vark-learn.com/english/index.asp if students do nothave access to the inventory with their texts or other materials. Other materials will includeitems that can be assembled to create the kinesthetic and multimodal models: coloredpaper, notecards, stapler, tape, straws, paper clips, newspaper/magazines, scissors,markers, colored pens, etc.Procedure: Administer the VARK learning styles inventory and explain the directions. Askstudents to answer as best they can and then score themselves as to which is their learningstyle preference. Then, divide the group into their learning styles preference. Give them anactivity sheet that matches their learning style preference (or not) and ask them to completethe activity. They will then share their creations with the class. After each group shares, havethem discuss their reactions to the ease or challenge of the assignment.Additional Readings / Resources:Books/Resources: VARK: A Guide to Learning Styles http://vvvvw.vark- learn.com/english/index.aspFleming, N. 2007*CD Baldwin, A. The Instructors Manual. The Community College Experience, 2nd Edition. Boston, MA: PearsonEducation, 2009. 27
  35. 35. Activity Sheet. VARK Learning PreferencesVARK Learning Styles ActivityGroup Aural (A)Members of the Group (including yourself):Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Your task as group Aural (A) is to write and perform a song about Howard Gardners MultipleIntelligences to the tune of either "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" or "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star."Record your lyrics below.Once you have completed the task, reflect on the experience. What was difficult and what waseasy about the task? Why? 28
  36. 36. VARK Learning Styles Activity Group Kinesthetic (K) Members of the Group (including yourself):Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Your task as group Kinesthetic (K) is to create a physical form with the materials provided thatrepresents the different personality types and learning styles that you have learned about inthis class.. Use the space below to provide a sketch of the model that you create.Once you have completed the task, reflect on the experience. What was difficult and what waseasy about the task? Why? 29
  37. 37. VARK Learning Styles ActivityGroup Multimodal (MM)Members of the Group (including yourself):Name VARK Learning PreferenceName VARK Learning PreferenceName VARK Learning PreferenceName VARK Learning PreferenceName VARK Learning PreferenceName VARK Learning PreferenceYour task as group Multimodal (MM) is to use at least two of the VARK learning stylepreferences to create a representation (can be a combination of visual, aural, read/write, andkinesthetic) of college success.Use the space below to provide information on your niultimodal presentation.Once you have completed the task, reflect on the experience. What was difficult and what waseasy about the task? Why? 30
  38. 38. VARK Learning Styles Activity Group Visual (V) Members of the Group (including yourself):Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________Name VARK Learning Preference _______________ Your task as group Visual (V) is to draw or create a picture with the materials provided that illustrates the connections between ones background, values, goals, and mission statement AND how that can connect to ones personality type.. Use the space below to provide a sketch of the picture.Once you have completed the task, reflect on the experience. What was difficult and what waseasy about the task? Why? 31
  39. 39. The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Tapping into EmotionsPurpose: The purpose of Tapping into Emotions is to allow students to examine their emotions incertain situations, recognize the pattern, and reflect on the lesson that is to be learned aboutthemselves.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to:  Understand and appreciate all emotions and feelings  Recognize emotional patterns  Identify the lessons to be learned in each type of emotional situationEstimated Time Requirement: This activity and discussion usually take approximately 30-45 minutes.Materials Needed: Tapping into Emotions activity sheetProcedure: Students will benefit from a brief discussion before the activity about identifyingemotions—both positive and negative—and exploring their "triggers." Talk about how certainsituations evoke a similar feeling/response in you and ask students to share situations that oftenmake them angry, joyful, scared, or excited. Then, using one of your own examples, talk aboutwhat the underlying "wisdom" or lesson is in that emotion.Additional Readings / Resources:Books: At the Heart of Leadership: How to Get Results with Emotional Intelligence Freedman, J. 2007 Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More than /Q Goleman, D. 1996 32
  40. 40. Activity Sheet: Tapping into EmotionsDirections: The following are examples adapted from Joshua Freedmans At the Heartof Leadership: How to Get Results with Emotional Intelligence. He argues that we oftenexperience emotions in a pattern. For example, similar situations will trigger a type ofresponse. It will help us, he argues, if we learn to recognize the pattern and to dig deeperto explore the reasons why we feel the way we do. Then, we should look for the wisdom inthe situation and response; in other words, we should look for a lesson to learn to improveourselves.Using the following "typical" college student examples, reflect on your emotional reaction tothese types of situations and what you think the wisdom, or lesson, is in each.1. EMOTION: DISCOMFORT A. TYPICAL SITUATION: You walk into a class for the first time and the professor seemsuninterested to teach or uninteresting in general. You suddenly get worried that you will not enjoythis class—and you have to have it for your degree.B. YOUR EXPERIENCE IN THIS SITUATION:C. THE LESSON TO BE LEARNED:2. EMOTION: ANXIETY/FEAR A. TYPICAL SITUATION: You walk into class where the professor explains everything that youare going to do this semester. He talks about a 15-page research paper, field studies, and weeklyjournals. You dont even have access to a computer.B. YOUR EXPERIENCE IN THIS SITUATION:C. THE LESSON TO BE LEARNED: 33
  41. 41. 3. EMOTION: EXCITEMENT A. TYPICAL SITUATION: You find out that you won a scholarship that will pay for books, tuition,and fees when you transfer to a four-year university next semester. You cant wait to share thegood news with your family because they were having a hard time helping support you while youwere in college.B. YOUR EXPERIENCE IN THIS SITUATION:C. THE LESSON TO BE LEARNED:4. EMOTION: JOY A. TYPICAL SITUATION: You have taken your last final exam and will be graduating next weekin front of your family, friends, and co-workers—and a few people who thought you wouldntmake it. You have a job ready and waiting for you in your field of study. While the pay may not behigh, it offers great opportunities for advancement. Your two children are proud to tell everyonethat their mom has a college degree, and you know that they will be more likely to attend collegebecause you did.B. YOUR EXPERIENCE IN THIS SITUATION:C. THE LESSON TO BE LEARNED: 34
  42. 42. SI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Reflecting on Your Learning Style*Purpose: The purpose of Reflecting on Your Learning Style is to allow students to reflect onhow much they understand about their learning styles.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: V Be more aware of how they receive and use information Be more aware of the environmental factors that affect their learningEstimated Time Requirement: 10 minutes to complete the activity. Discussion time inclass will vary.Materials Needed: Reflecting on Your Learning Style activity sheetProcedure: Students can complete the activity as a homework assignment or as a reflective in-class assignment. Follow-up can vary: o Pair-share activity with a classmate o Small group discussions in which students are grouped according to similar assessment rankings o Large class discussion*Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? 2nd Edition. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: Pearson Education, 2009. 35
  43. 43. Activity Sheet. Reflecting on Your Learning Style*There are no "right" answers for the questions below. Its okay if you cannot recall exactlywhich type of questions you most often faced; try to remember as best you can. Write fromyour heart. This exercise is not meant for you to answer just like your classmates, or tomatch what you may think the instructor wants to see. Take your time to give a respectfuland responsible general accounting of your experiences with critical thinking. A truthfulself-assessment now will help you build on skills you presently possess while developingthose you lack.For the following items circle the number that best describes your typical experience.The key for the numbers is: 0 = never, 1 = almost never, 2 = occasionally, 3 = frequently,4 = almost always, 5 = alwaysWhen considering your past successes and challenges with learning, how often:1. Did you notice that a classroom lecture, when it was accompanied with photos, slides, transparencies, or a PowerPoint presentation, either positively or negatively affected your ability to understand the material? 0 1 2 3 4 52. Did you notice that directions, when they were given verbally without any visuals, affected your ability to understand the message? 0 1 2 3 4 53. Did you notice that when you were allowed to do something physically with material, like create a picture or model of it, this had an impact on your learning? a 1 2 3 4 54. Did you notice that the amount of lighting in a room either positively or negatively affected your ability to study or pay attention? o 1 2 3 4 55. Were you aware of how the temperature of a classroom or study space had an impact on how well you focused on the topic at hand? 0 1 2 3 4 5*Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? 2nd Edition. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: Pearson Education, 2009. 36
  44. 44. 6. Did you perform better when instructors clearly mapped the exact steps you had to follow to complete a task? 0 1 2 3 4 57. Did you notice the affect eating or not eating a meal before an exam had on your performance? 0 1 2 3 4 58. Did you notice how background noise helped or hindered your concentration? 0 1 2 3 4 5Add up your scores for items 1, 2, 3, and 6. Divide by 4. Write your answer here: ____Using the key explanations for each number (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) complete this sentence: When it conies to how I receive and understand information, I am _______________ aware of my learning preference.Add up your scores for items 4, 5, 6, and 8. Divide by 4. Write your answer here: ____Using the key explanations for each number (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) complete this sentence: When it comes to how environmental factors affect my learning, I am _____________ aware of these factors.Based on your answers, what insights do you have about your experiences with identifying andusing your learning style? ___________________________________________________ 37
  45. 45. SI The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: How Do You Learn Best?*Purpose: How Do You Learn Best? provides students with more opportunity to reflect on whatworks best for them (auditory, visual, kinesthetic—or a combination of the three) when learning.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: V Identify specific examples of when and how they learned best with auditory, visual, and/or kinesthetic classroom lessons.Estimated Time Requirement: 20 minutesMaterials Needed: How Do You Learn Best? activity sheetProcedure: Provide students with an overview of the auditory, visual, and kinesthetic learning.Ask students to complete How Do You Learn Best? activity sheet. Place students in threegroups based on the learning style they seem to most prefer. Ask each group to list at leastthree reasons why this particular learning style works best for them and list at least threestrategies for other students who have difficulty with this type of learning style. Conclude with ,comments about the value of knowing ones learning style.*Instructors manual to accompany Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? 2nd Edition. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2009. 38
  46. 46. Activity Sheet: How Do You Learn Best?*Auditory. Describe a recent class situation in which you understood the material by hearingan explanation. You really got it! Rate how often this happens on a scale of 1 (almost never) to5 (almost always). Explain why you think you got it or why you think you did not get it.Visual. Describe a recent class situation in which you understood the material by seeing theexplanation. Maybe the instructor used pictures or a model. Whatever she used, you really gotit! Rate how often this happens on a scale of 1 (almost never) to 5 (almost always). Explainwhy you think you got it or why you think you did not get it.Kinesthetic. Describe a recent class situation in which you understood the material byphysically doing something. Maybe it was a science lab or maybe you constructed a model.Whatever happened, you really got it! Rate how often this happens on a scale of 1 (almostnever) to 5 (almost always). Explain why you think you got it or why you think you did notget it.Environment. Describe the environment (climate, lighting, ventilation, sound) that helps youto learn the best. 39
  47. 47. *Rhythms of College Success: A Journey of Discovery, Change, and Mastery. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: PearsonEducation, 2008, 99.
  48. 48. The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Prioritizing Your Intelligences*Purpose: Knowledge of learning styles and multiple intelligences provides students withinformation to help them be more proactive in developing learning strategies.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: v Identify specific examples of when and how they learned best with auditory, visual, and/or kinesthetic classroom lessons.Estimated Time Requirement: 25 minutesMaterials Needed: The background material and the Prioritize Your Intelligences activitysheetProcedure: Explain Gardners theory of multiple intelligences (see background informationon the next page). Ask students to complete the Prioritize Your Intelligences activity sheet.Upon completion, group students in either of the ways outlined below: Group all students according what they listed as their most developed intelligence. Share what makes this a favored intelligence Group students according to the most and least developed intelligence. For instance, group those who ranked linguistic intelligence as the most developed with those who ranked linguistic intelligence as the least developed. Ask the students who ranked it high to suggest strategies to develop the intelligence to the students who ranked it low. Conclude class discussion about the benefit of this information for active learning.*Instructors manual to accompany Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? 2nd Edition. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2009. 40
  49. 49. Activity Sheet Background Information: Understanding Multiple Intelligences*Howard Gardner, a Harvard professor, did pioneering research in this area. He maintains thatmeasuring intelligence (IQ) with one number is misleading. It leads us to believe that there isone intelligence. According to Dr. Gardner, there are actually eight intelligences.t That is, wehave eight different abilities to pick from when solving problems. Unfortunately, many of ushave been trained to use only two or three of these. Just think of what we can do once we tapinto as many of the eight intelligences as possible!The Eight Intelligences*Although some of our eight intelligences are more advanced than the others, we have tracesof each intelligence. Some may be highly developed and some a little less developed. Hereis Gardners list (with clarification in parentheses provided from the work of ThomasArmstrong). Linguistic intelligence (word smart). You are good with the written word. You canexpress yourself with language. Occupations include writer, speaker, lawyer, and teacher. Logical mathematical intelligence (number smart). You can think abstractly andsolve problems. Logic and order are strengths for you. You understand cause and effect.Manipulation of numbers comes easily. Occupations include scientist and mathematician. Spatial intelligence (art smart). You can recreate your world visually. A sound sense ofdirection is involved, too. Occupations include sculptor, painter, and anatomy teacher. Bodily—kinesthetic intelligence (body smart). You have coordinated control of yourown body. There is a strong sense of learning by movement or action. You can effectivelyuse your hands, fingers, and arms to make something. Occupations include athlete, actor,and dancer. Musical intelligence (music smart). You have the ability to use the major componentsof music (rhythm or pitch). You can recognize patterns and use them effectively. Occupationsinclude musician and dancer. Interpersonal intelligence (people smart). You have an understanding of the moodand motives of those with whom you associate. If you are to effectively deal with otherpeople you must be skilled in this intelligence. Occupations include teacher, politician, and salesperson. *Rhythms of College Success: A Journey of Discovery Change, and Mastery. Piscitelli, S.Boston, MA: Pearson Education, 2008, 99-100.tGardners groundbreaking book is entitled Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences (1993).tA ninth intelligence is being investigated—spiritual. This intelligence refers to the ability to connect with nonphysicalor metaphysical stimuli. For our purposes we will look at the first eight.§Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Armstrong, T. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and CurriculumDevelopment, 1994. 41
  50. 50. Intrapersonal intelligence (me smart). You understand yourself and can apply thatknowledge in real-life situations to produce the best results. You understand what is good foryou. You know who you are and what you can do. You know what to associate with and whatto avoid. Occupations include independent contractor. Naturalistic intelligence (nature smart). You can understand, explain, and relate tothings in the natural world around you. You have a unique ability to classify and separateitems based on characteristics. Occupations include botanist, zoologist, archaeologist, andenvironmentalist. 42
  51. 51. Activity Sheet: Prioritize Your Intelligences*List the intelligences in order from the one intelligence that is most developed in you to the onethat is least developed as they relate to you. Write a brief description how you have come tobelieve this. Be specific (perhaps give an example that explains your ranking).My most (1st) developed intelligence is ___________________________ o M y evidence is ________________________________________________________________My 2nd most developed intelligence is _____________________________ o M y evidence is ________________________________________________________My 3rd most developed intelligence is ____________________________ o M y evidence is ________________________________________________________________My 4th most developed intelligence is ____________________________ o My evidence is ____________________________________________________My5th most developed intelligence is _______________________________ o My evidence is ____________________________________________________My6th most developed intelligence is _______________________________ o My evidence is ____________________________________________________My7th most developed intelligence is _______________________________ o My evidence is ___________________________________________________________My8th most developed intelligence is _______________________________ o My evidence is ____________________________________________________Finally, what insights can you draw from this activity? _________________*Instructors manual to accompany Study Skills: Do 1 Really Need This Stuff? 2nd Edition. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA:Pearson Education, 2009. 43
  52. 52. The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: Multiple Intelligences—Majors and Careers*Purpose: Multiple Intelligences—Majors and Careers provides a practical application of themultiple intelligences theory.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: V Develop connections between multiple intelligences, careers, and majors EstimatedTime Requirement: 20 minutesMaterials Needed: Background Information: Understanding Multiple Intelligences, whichwas used in the Prioritize Your Intelligences activity, and the Multiple Intelligences—Majors andCareers activity sheetProcedure: The table on the next page lists a few possible careers for each of the multipleintelligences. A guest speaker can be a powerful way through which to reinforce this connection.For instance, the campus librarian could explain how linguistic intelligence is critical to his or herjob. He or she can also demonstrate how other intelligences are needed to successfully carry outthe jobs duties. A similar activity can be done with other guest speakers. Ask the students tocollaborate with a classmate and complete the last column. Conclude with a class discussionabout student answers and where students may be able to find more information.*Rhythms of College Success: A Journey of Discovery, Change, and Mastery. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: PearsonEducation, 2008, 101. 44
  53. 53. Activity Sheet: Multiple Intelligences—Majors and Careers*Collaborate with a classmate and complete the last column of the chart below. What majors will prepare you for these careers? Multiple Intelligence Possible careers (selected) Linguistic intelligence (word smart) Writer, public speaker, lawyer, teacher, journalist, librarian, talk show host, tour guide Logical—mathematical intelligence (number smart) Scientist, mathematician, banker, investment broker, accountant, doctor Spatial intelligence (art smart) Sculptor, painter, anatomy teacher, architect, builder, photographer, urban planner, artist, interior decorator Bodily—kinesthetic intelligence (body smart) Athlete, actor, dancer, trainer, gymnast, thespian, massage therapist, model Musical intelligence (music smart) Musician, dancer, critic, music instructor, singer, record producer Interpersonal intelligence (people smart) Teacher, politician, salespeople, arbitrator, manager, human resources executive, psychologist, social worker, marriage counselor, coach, nurse, doctor Intrapersonal intelligence (me smart) Independent-type work, life style coach, energy healer, clergy, philosopher, writer Naturalistic intelligence (nature smart) Botanist, zoologist, archeologist, meteorologist, environmentalist, animal trainer, veterinarian*Rhythms of College Success: A Journey of Discovery Change, and Mastery. Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: PearsonEducation, 2008, 101. 45
  54. 54. The National Student Success InstituteActive LearningACTIVITY: How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners?Purpose: How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners? stresses the importanceof a strong support network to help students develop their intellectual skills. Students who feelconnected to their classes and their campus have a better chance to experience success. A studypartner may be one of the most important people students will meet. He or she can be thebeginning of a larger support group.Learning Objective: At the end of this activity, students will be able to: ,( Establish and use criteria when choosing study partnersEstimated Time Requirement: 20 minutesMaterials Needed: How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners? activity sheetProcedure: Explain to students that a study partner (or a study group) can help them: make sense of class notes. understand lengthy and confusing reading assignments. see different perspectives (interpretations) of course material. chose a topic for a term research paper. prepare for an upcoming exam. understand a difficult concept. cope with classroom failures. celebrate classroom successes.Ask them to complete How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners? activity sheetPair students and ask them to compare notes. Conclude with a class discussion about the benefitsof establishing such criteria. Follow-up: You may use the follow-up activity that accompanies thisactivity as a way for students to evaluate their study groups once they have formed and met acouple of times. They can use this to see if they need to make any adjustments.*Rhythms of College Success: A Journey of Discovery Change, and Mastery Piscitelli, S. Boston, MA: PearsonEducation, 2008, 121-122. 46
  55. 55. Activity Sheet: How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners?Lets assume you have to find a study partner by the end of this week. When buying a car orrenting an apartment or securing a job, you establish certain criteria to help you make the decision.After all, you want the very best for yourself The same rigor should hold for choosing a studypartner. For this activity, pick one of your classes in which a study partner may be of assistance.List the strengths (attitude, skills, content knowledge) that you want your study partners tohave. Be as specific as you can.List at least three students you consider to be good "candidates" for your peer study partnerthis term.1. 2. 3.For each of your choices above, list at least one strength that person would bring to a studygroup. Be as specific as you can.1. 2. 3.Finally, for any strategy to be successful the person using it must see a benefit in the strategy.What benefit does a study partner or group bring to you? What benefit do you bring to the
  56. 56. What steps will you take to approach these people to be your peer study partners? When willyou do it? Write these steps below.
  57. 57. Follow-up to How Do You Know Who Would Make Good Study Partners? How effective and beneficial has your study group been?Save this activity until you have met with your study partner or group at least three times.Reflect on the experience and then evaluate the benefit of the partner or group. Be as specificas you can.If you think there has been a benefit, explain what the benefit or benefits have been.If you believe there has been no benefit, explain what has happened or not happened.Do you believe forming a study partnership has been the right choice for you—and will youcontinue working with one? Why or why not? 48

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