Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

New National Park at Nilpena, Flinders Ranges, South Australia

132 views

Published on

As an exemplar of geodiversity in the Earth’s geological record, the Ediacaran fossil assemblage of the Flinders Ranges also celebrates the very birth of the Earth’s biodiversity.
As one of Australia’s most significant National Landscapes, the Flinders Ranges has the making of being also declared as another UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife (FNPW) with the Flinders Ranges Ediacara Foundation and the SA Government aims to create a new national park as a key core component of this vision - truly and outstanding geotourism destination for Australia.

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

New National Park at Nilpena, Flinders Ranges, South Australia

  1. 1. New National Park at Nilpena Flinders Ranges South Australia Angus M Robinson Australian Geoscience Council
  2. 2. Australia’s 16 National Landscapes
  3. 3. Source: CARTO GRAPHICS
  4. 4. Australia’s Big Outdoor Museum: The Magnificent Flinders Ranges Source: Sir Douglas Mawson, Eminent Explorer and Geologist Photo Credit: South Australian Tourism Commission/Adam Bruzzone
  5. 5. “Welcome to my Country” Haydyn Bromley of the Adnyamathanha people
  6. 6. Flinders Ranges World Heritage Serial Nomination – Key Criterion World Heritage Listing of these outstanding values is being pursued under criterion (viii): “to be outstanding examples representing major stages of earth’s history  including the record of life,  significant on-going processes in the development of landforms, or  significant geomorphic or physiographic features”.
  7. 7. Flinders Ranges World Heritage Serial Nomination – Nilpena Ediacaran Site  A proposed new National Park will protect an internationally significant fossil assemblage, representing the first fossilised remains of a community of soft-bodied Ediacaran organisms not found in such abundance anywhere in the world.  These fossils are some 560 million years old, and as the first known radiation of multicellular animal life, they have given scientists a new understanding of the evolution of life on earth.
  8. 8. Flinders Ranges World Heritage Serial Nomination – Arkaroola Site  In addition to the extra record of the emergence of animal life, this site records many extraordinary physical and chemical geological processes of global significance. One fine example is the ‘hot rocks’ of Arkaroola containing uranium and radium.  This natural radioactive heat phenomenon has generated geological processes and landforms not known anywhere else on Earth.
  9. 9. Flinders Ranges World Heritage Serial Nomination – Geotourism Potential  There are a number of areas set aside for protection and management of the region’s natural, cultural and historic values, on public, private and leasehold land.  Pastoralism has had a strong historic influence in the region, and continues to be an important industry today.  The region’s rich values and breathtaking landscapes make the Flinders Ranges an iconic geotourism destination with unparalleled visitor experiences.
  10. 10. Geotourism comprises the following features of both natural and cultural heritage:  Abiotic – non-living aspects such as the climate & geology e.g. landscape and landforms: GEODIVERSITY  Biotic – the living parts eg. fauna (animals) and flora (plants): BIODIVERSITY  Cultural – past & present, non-living and built Holistic in scope, geotourism is the key driver for UNESCO Geoparks, World Heritage Areas, and Australian National Landscapes.
  11. 11. Flinders Ranges World Heritage – Landscape and Geology (‘A’)
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Flinders Ranges World Heritage - Flora ('B')  The Flinders Ranges supports an eccentric mix of moisture dependant and arid adapted plants. The specialised habitats of local endemics are bound to the region's geology.  Native vegetation is shaped by landform, soil, climate and fire. It is also influenced by human activity. Native plants sustained the cultural and economic lives of the Flinders Ranges Andyamathanha people for thousands of years.  At least 85 plant species in the Flinders Ranges are of national, state or regional conservation significance.
  14. 14. Flinders Ranges World Heritage – Flora(‘B’)
  15. 15. Flinders Ranges World Heritage - Fauna ('B')  Owing to the establishment of permanent waterholes for stock and the removal of Dingos from the Flinders Ranges, the Red Kangaroo, Western Grey Kangaroo and Euro have all increased their range and population. Accordingly, the proposed National Park will be one of the best parks in Australia to view these unique animals.  Not so fortunate was the Yellow-footed Rock-wallaby, which was almost pushed to extinction.  Bird life is rich and varied in the region with more than 100 native bird species recorded.
  16. 16. Flinders Ranges World Heritage – Fauna(‘B’)
  17. 17. Flinders Ranges World Heritage - Culture ('C')  Whilst geologists use science to explain how the Flinders Ranges were formed. The Adnyamathanha people of the Flinders Ranges have their own creation histories for the land and the life it supports. The creation histories and geology complement each other, enriching our knowledge of the landscape.  Land use changed with the arrival of Europeans in the 1850s. High stocking rates on early pastoral leases, land clearances for agriculture, a century of feral animals, competition from introduced plant species and fewer bushfires, have dramatically altered the ecology of many plant communities in the Flinders Ranges.
  18. 18. Flinders Ranges World Heritage – Culture (‘C’)
  19. 19. Flinders Ranges – Geoscience Cultural Heritage  Arkaroola Wilderness Sanctuary was established in 1968 by geologist, Dr Reginald Sprigg AO, mentored by his friend, Sir Douglas Mawson.  In 1946, Dr Sprigg discovered the Ediacara biota. Involved in uranium & petroleum exploration with the SA Geological Survey and with various companies.  Dr Sprigg acquired Arkaroola, a derelict pastoral lease, and transformed it into a wildlife sanctuary, now an outstanding world class geotourism attraction.
  20. 20. Yellow-Footed Rock-Wallaby  In 1979 FNPW purchased 10,000 hectares near the Mutawintji National Park, near Broken Hill for the conservation and protection of the Yellow-Footed Rock-Wallaby, a beautiful macropod species not endemic to, but a well-known icon of the Flinders Ranges.  Forty years on, FNPW now offers a unique opportunity to further enhance the conservation of this and other threatened species through the establishment of a major addition to our Natural Heritage Estate. Photo credit: Jason Irving
  21. 21. Overview - Flinders Ranges WHA  As an exemplar of geodiversity in the Earth’s geological record, the Ediacaran fossil assemblage of the Flinders Ranges also celebrates the very birth of the Earth’s biodiversity.  As one of Australia’s most significant National Landscapes, the Flinders Ranges has the making of being also declared as another UNESCO World Heritage Site.  FNPW with the Flinders Ranges Ediacara Foundation and the SA Government aims to create a new national park as a key core component of this vision. Ediacara Spriggina
  22. 22. The Way Forward – How Can We Realise this Exciting Vision? Contact CEO Ian Darbyshire P: (02) 9221 1949 | M: 0433 160 652 E: idarbyshire@fnpw.org.au

×