Understanding the impact of military deployment on families an australian study mc guire

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Understanding the impact of military deployment on families an australian study mc guire

  1. 1. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans Dr Annabel McGuire, Elliroma Gardiner and Catherine Runge The University of Queensland Centre for Military and Veterans’ Health (CMVH) Understanding the impact ofUnderstanding the impact of military deployment on families:military deployment on families: An Australian studyAn Australian study Tuesday 10th August 2010 – Presentation to the 13th Annual Force Health Protection Conference
  2. 2. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans Background of Family Studies • Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program (launched 2007) Vietnam Veterans’ Family Study • To identify any intergenerational effects of Vietnam service Timor-Leste Family Study 2009-11 • To understand the effects of deployment on Australian Defence Force (ADF) families from a recent deployment The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program
  3. 3. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans Current literature on families & deployment The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program • Studies in the current international literature indicate that deployment has adverse effects on families • However, individual and social resources are shown to intensify or ameliorate these effects • Not a comprehensive literature • Few Australian studies
  4. 4. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans • To determine what, if any physical, mental or social health impacts there are on a service member’s family from the member’s deployment to Timor-Leste • To identify any risk and protective factors that influence the ability of military families to cope with deployments The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program Research Aims
  5. 5. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans 1. Timor-Leste Deployment 2. Physical Health 3. Mental Health 4. Family Health 5. Child Health 6. Social Health 7. Risk and Protective factors The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program Measures of interest
  6. 6. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans Methodology The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program
  7. 7. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans Focus Group participants • 17 participants, female, aged 20-52 years • 82% married to the ADF member • 47% with children under 18 years of age • 13 of 17 were partners of Army personnel • Partner deployments to Timor-Leste, Middle East, South Pacific & Africa The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program
  8. 8. Advancing knowledge about the health issues of Australia’s defence personnel and veterans The Deployment Cycle The Timor-Leste Family Study is part of the Department of Veterans’ Affairs Family Study Program Pincus, SH, House, R, Christenson, J & Adler, LE
  9. 9. cumplex Family ystems Model
  10. 10. Pre-Deployment (several weeks to a year) Characterised by denial and anticipation of loss mmon experiences included: long training hours for tary member, getting affairs in order, mental and physical distance and arguments
  11. 11. eployment (1st month) haracterised by a roller er of emotions and may be easant and disorganised. mon experiences included: mixed emotions/relief, soriented/overwhelmed,
  12. 12. Sustainment (from 2nd month) racterised by establishing new sources of support and new routines. Common experiences included: relying on new urces of support, establishing new routines and eling more in control, independent and confident.
  13. 13. Redeployment (Last month) is the last month before return – characterised by ntense anticipation, often with mixed emotions. Common experiences included: anticipation of ecoming, excitement, apprehension, energy bursts and difficulty making decisions.
  14. 14. Post-Deployment (3-6 months after) rts with homecoming and time frame varies from family to family. mmon experiences included: honeymoon period, s of independence for the spouse, need for one’s n space, renegotiating routines and reintegrating
  15. 15. sk & Protective Factors Social support  friends, family, military unit, military community, local community Communication with deployed member Age and stage of life  pregnancy, children, ages of children Personal circumstance
  16. 16. sitive outcomes of deployment creased Autonomy sonal development Strengthening of relationships
  17. 17. Where to next Complete qualitative analysis ntegrate findings into quantitative survey Conduct questionnaire Final report to Department of Veterans’
  18. 18. ong term aim To assist the Department of Veterans’ Affairs and other key stakeholders in understanding any implications of the research findings for their programs and service delivery.
  19. 19. • www.cmvh.org.au • www.dva.gov.au • families@cmvh.org.au • healthstudy@dva.gov.au • 1800 708 335 (Australia) Questions?

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