Chapter 8

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Chapter 8

  1. 1. Chapter 8 Responding to Violations of Rules and Procedures Comprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Edition © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Appropriate and Effective Responses Infrequent Behavior  Academic  Social  Assume student is trying  Assume student is not to make correct trying to make correct response response.  Assume error was  Assume error was accidental deliberate  Provide assistance  Provide negative  Provide more practice consequences  Assumes student has  Practice not required. learned skill and will  Assume student will perform in future make right choice and behave in future.Comprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 2
  3. 3. Learning Goals  How to develop an effective classroom system for responding to behavior that disrupts the learning environment  How to respond effectively to minor disruptive behaviors in a classroom or school setting  How to respond to major disruptions and defiant student behaviorComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 3
  4. 4. Frequent behavior  Academic  Social  Assume student has learned  Assume student refuses to the wrong way cooperate  Assumes student has been  Assume student knows taught the wrong way what is right and has bee  Diagnose the problem told often  Identify misrule or  Provide more negative determine more effective consequences manner in which to present  Withdraws student from the material normal consequences.  Adjust presentation  Maintain student removal  Assume student has been from normal consequences taught skill and will perform  Assume student has correctly in the future “learned” lesson and will behave in future.Comprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 4
  5. 5. General Concepts and Methods in Responding Effectively to Inappropriate or Disruptive Behavior 1. Arrange seating patterns so that you can 12. The intervention should not be greater than the easily access all students disruption 2. Scan the class to respond to problems and 13. Monitor your own anger needs 14. Remain calm: Positive ripple effect is 3. State expectations clearly associated with a calm and immediate 4. Ignore behavior response 5. Use proximity control 15. Speak courteously 6. Place note on student’s desk 16. Make eye-contact and be aware of non-verbal 7. Involve student in story or questions message 8. Increase interest with humor or topic of 17. Remind students of classroom rules interest 18. Use I statements 9. Make contact-- When misbehavior occurs- 19. Provide students with choices make quiet contact with student 20. Remind students of the positive consequences 10. See if student needs some assistance associated with behaving 11. Use a signal that you would like the 21. Reinforce students who are close by and behavior to stop behaving appropriately 22. Focus on positive behavior-quietly reprimand fewComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 5
  6. 6. Teacher Effectiveness Training (TET)  Gordon believed that teachers should express a concern about student’ behavior that affects the teacher by employing I- messages consisting of three components:  a. the personal pronoun I  b. the feeling teacher is experiencing  c. the affect the students behavior is having on the teacherComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 6
  7. 7. Responding to Defiant Behavior  Prepare students for situations that may be difficult  An once of prevention is worth a pound of cure  Build a positive relationship bank account with known power strugglers  Having a relationship with the students has been proven to reduce problem behavior  Ensure That Your Requests Have Been Made Clearly, Politely, and Firmly  When cuing students regarding their behavior, it is more effective to use the word reminder or refer to the “agreed” upon rules than to use the word warning  Model Self-Control  Teachers can get pulled into a power-struggle with the student. Remain calm. Sometimes studentsComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 7
  8. 8. Respond Thoughtfully and withPurpose to Deescalate the Behavior  1. Expand on the active-listening techniques when you identify the feelings the student might be feeling  It sounds like you’re frustrated  2. Send an I message—I would be angry too, if I thought I as asked to complete something I didn’t know how to do  3. Offer Assistance  Provide options  Predict a positive choice and its consequencesComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 8
  9. 9. Respond Thoughtfully and withPurpose to Deescalate the Behavior  6. State the expectation in a positive manner  7. Review available options and consequences, and give the student space and time to make a choice  8. Walk away  9. Clarify that the student must make a choice  10. Give the student an errand to run  11. Help students develop a menu of coping strategiesComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 9
  10. 10. Sequence to De-escalate Behavior  Phase I: Validating/Clarifying  Validate the underlying feelings  Help them understand the impact of the behavior on others  Help them understand that behavior violates rules  Phase II: Choices/Options—Educative Function  What would be a better way?  What would be a better choice  Would you like to take a few minutes in the quiet area?  If you continue to violate, you would be choosing to work this our with the principal  Phase III: Invitation  I am sure we can work this out  You’re been making good choices lately, I know we can solve this  I really want you to stay here and solve the problemComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 10
  11. 11. Handling Violent Student Behavior An ounce of prevention is  Dress in a manner that worth a pound of cure minimized risk of injury Teacher tension can often  Remind misbehaving students agitate crisis behavior of the consequence of their behavior Always remain calm  Allow verbal venting Lower your voice  Ignore irrelevant comments— Slow your rate of speech Redirect student back to Arrange the environment to problem minimize risk  Provide choices Give the student space  Set limits Be aware of your body stance  Use Physical restraints  Once the student is calm, teach alternative appropriate ways to deal with angerComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 11
  12. 12. Using Time-Out The use of time-out is controversial Make the time-out into a problem- solving/solution room instead of punishmentComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 12
  13. 13. Dealing with Bullies  Make sure you provide support for the victim  Do not reinforce the aggressor  Let bully know that their behavior is not acceptable  Deal with bully firmly and clearly  Remove bully from setting until the bully  understands why his/her behavior is unacceptable, including how it impacted victim and school  practice behaviors her/she could use in the future situations to meet his needs without creating an unsafe classroom  Develop school-wide planComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 13
  14. 14. The Role of Reinforcement in EncouragingStudents to Act Responsibly  Rewards positive behavior  Need to be weaned off at appropriate timeComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 14
  15. 15. Why Problem Solving Rather than Punishment?  Students need support and assistance  Punishment inhibits learning  Punishment does not change behavior  Punishment allows student to project blame  May create a negative attitudeComprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Ed. © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.Jones & Jones 15
  16. 16. End of Chapter 8 Comprehensive Classroom Management, 9th Edition © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

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