Geospatial Mapping and City Success

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Geospatial Mapping and City Success

  1. 1. Geospatial Mapping AndCity Success: BuildingBridges And Finding LostTreasurePrepared For2013 Talent Dividend MeetingThe CEOs For CitiesPhiladelphia, PennsylvaniaApril 7-9, 2013Prepared By The University of New Mexico Center For EducationPolicy ResearchPeter Winograd, Angelo Gonzales, Amy Ballard,Laura Robison, & Jason Timm
  2. 2. Overview • Cities And The Search For Prosperity • The Threats To Prosperity • Our Framework • Our City • The Power Of Geospatial Mapping • Questions2
  3. 3. Prosperity Depends On Trust And Human Capital3
  4. 4. The Gravest Threats To Albuquerque’s Prosperity Are The Deep Disparities Among Our Communities And The Education Achievement Gap That Wastes Much Of Our Future Human Capital4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. Quality Counts Framework: A Child’s Chances For Success • Early Foundations – Family income: Percent of children in families with incomes at least 200% of poverty level – Parental education: Percent of children with at least one parent with a postsecondary degree – Parental employment: Percent of children with at least one parent working full time and year- round – Linguistic integration: Percent of children whose parents are fluent English speakers • School Years – Preschool enrollment: Percent of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in preschool – Kindergarten enrollment: Percent of eligible children enrolled in kindergarten programs – 4th grade reading: Percent of 4th grade public school students “proficient” on NAEP – 8th grade math: Percent of 8th grade public school students “proficient” on NAEP – High school graduation: Percent of public high school students who graduate with a diploma – Young adult (18 – 24) education: Percent of young adults (18 – 24) enrolled in postsecondary education or with a degree • Adult Outcomes – Adult educational attainment: Percent of adults (25 – 64) with a 2- or 4-year postsecondary degree – Annual income: Percent of adults (25 – 64) with incomes at or above national median – Steady employment: Percent of adults (25 – 64) in labor force working full time and year- round7 Source: Education Week, Quality Counts, http://www.edweek.org/ew/qc/index.html.
  8. 8. A Child’s Chances For Success Impact The Generations That Follow For Better Or Worse Early Foundations Early • Family income Foundations • Parental education • Parental employment • Linguistic integration Adult School Years School Years Outcomes • Preschool enrollment • Kindergarten enrollment • 4th grade reading • 8th grade mathematics • High school graduation • Young adult [18-24] education School Years Adult Adult Outcomes Outcomes • Adult educational attainment • Annual income • Steady employment Early Foundations8 Source: Education Week, Quality Counts, http://www.edweek.org/ew/qc/index.html.
  9. 9. New Mexico Children’s Chances For Success Are Among The Worst In The Nation, 2013 WA ME MT ND WA OR ME MN ME VTNH MT MT ND ID ND MN VTNH MI NYD OR MN SD WI VTNH MA A- A- SD ID WI MI NY MA MI NY CTRI A- WY SD CTRIWY WI MA IA WY PA CTRI B+ B+ NE NJ PA OH IA NJ B+ UT IL IN MDDE IA NE PA NJ B CO NV WV NE OH NV VA OH B B KS MO UT KY UT IL IN MDDE IL IN MDDE B- NC WV WV CA CA TN CO CO OK VAAZ B- NMC+ AR KS MO KS VA B- AL GA SC KY MO KY MS NC C+ C TN TX OK NC C+ C- AZ LA NM AR SC TN C OK AZ FL AR SC D+ NM AL GA C- C D TX MS 2013 Quality LA MS AL GA D+ C- FL Counts Children’s D TX D+ LA Chances For FL D Success Index is HI based on measures of Family Status, AK Progress Through HI School, and Adult Outcomes. AK 9 HI Source: Education Week, Quality Counts, http://www.edweek.org/ew/qc/index.html.
  10. 10. Early Foundations: Teen Births Per 1000, 2009 Teen Births per 1000 16 - 28 28.01 - 41 41 41.01 - 53 53.01 - 64 53.01 - 64 4510 Data from Annie E. Casey Foundation website: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data/ for 2009.
  11. 11. School Years: High School Graduation Rates, By State 2009-2010 High School Graduation Rate 86% - 91% 81% - 85% 77% - 80% 70% - 76% 58% - 69% Hawaii 75.4% Alaska 75.5% Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data:11 School Year 2009 – 2010
  12. 12. School Years: New Mexico’s College Graduation Rates Are Among The Worst In The Nation The 2009 six-year graduation rates of bachelor degree students by state for the entering cohort of 2003. The average college graduation rate for the U.S. is 55.5%. 26.9% - 40% 40.1% - 55.4% (Below natl avg.) 55.5% - 60.2% (Above natl avg.) 60.3% - 69.2% AK Source: The National Center For Higher Education Management Systems Information Center for Higher Education12 Policymaking and Analysis.
  13. 13. Adult Outcomes: Persons 18-24 Not In Labor Force Or School, No Degree Above HS, 2010 This map shows percent of population that is not in the labor force or attending school, with no degree beyond high school. Colors indicate distance from national mean with redder states having higher rates of unemployed persons not attending school or having beyond a high Hawaii school degree. 17% < -1.5 Std. Dev. -1.5 - -0.50 Std. Dev. Alaska 20% -0.50 - 0.50 Std. Dev. 0.50 - 1.5 Std. Dev. 1.5 - 2.2 Std. Dev.13 Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation, KIDS COUNT Data Center, www.kidscount.org .
  14. 14. As Goes The Child, So Goes The City14
  15. 15. New Mexico Counties15
  16. 16. Albuquerque And Local Communities With Census Tracts16
  17. 17. Albuquerque Neighborhoods: The Soul Of Our City17
  18. 18. Percent of Individuals Who Speak a Language Other Than English at Home, Bernalillo County Westside Northeast Heights North Valley International Zone University/ Nob Hill South Valley Speak a Language Other Than English at Home 7% - 16.7% 16.8% - 25% 25.1% - 37.4% 37.5% - 53.1% 53.2% - 89%18 Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 2007 - 2011
  19. 19. Per Capita Income, Bernalillo County Westside Northeast Heights North Valley University/ International Zone Nob Hill South Valley Per Capita Income (dollars) $10,232.00 - $18,272.00 $18,272.01 - $25,308.00 $25,308.01 - $33,747.00 $33,747.01 - $46,627.00 $46,627.01 - $69,484.0019 Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 2007 - 2011
  20. 20. Number of Individuals Who Earn Less than $10,000 per year, Bernalillo County Westside Northeast Heights North Valley International Zone University/ Nob Hill South Valley Number of Individuals Earning Less than $10,000 per Year 0 - 26 27 - 64 65 - 111 112 - 188 189 - 315 Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 2007 - 2011
  21. 21. Individuals Living Below 200 Percent of Poverty Level with Less than High School Education Westside Northeast Heights North Valley International Zone University/ Nob Hill All Individuals Below 200 Percent of Poverty Level 85 - 624 625 - 1256 South Valley 1257 - 1946 1947 - 3059 3060 - 4950 Less than High School Graduate 0 - 184 185 - 397 398 - 650 651 - 1047 1048 - 168221 Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 2007 - 2011
  22. 22. Life Expectancy By Census Tract, Bernalillo County, NM (2001-2005) This powerful map by the Joint Center For Political and Economic Studies shows that life expectancy can vary by 28 years depending on where one lives in Bernalillo County. Source: Map produced by Joint Center For Political and Economic Studies (September, 2012) Place22 Matters For Health In Bernalillo County: Ensuring Opportunities For Good Health For All.
  23. 23. The Power Of Geospatial Mapping • Description: Making the data accessible to all audiences – Painting the picture of urgency – Identifying risk, needs, and assets • Analysis: Making sense of the data – Identifying gaps in resources – Setting priorities – Measuring impact • Action: Using data for change – Providing a basis for advocacy – Strengthening public engagement – Developing policy23
  24. 24. A Few Advantages of Geospatial Mapping • Geospatial mapping is used extensively in other fields including health and human services, natural resources, public safety, defense, and urban and regional planning. Each of these fields has conceptual frameworks and analytical techniques that offer unique insights when applied to educational issues. • The data in the maps are immediately accessible to a wide range of audiences including policy-makers, community members, educators, students, and parents. • Maps are powerful conversation starters. Everybody sees something different in the maps based on their perspectives and experiences. • Maps equalize the conversations among different groups at the table. People want to know what others think. • Maps can convey the message that we are one community, bound together by a sense of place.24
  25. 25. DESCRIPTION Making The Data Accessible To All Audiences25
  26. 26. Story 1: The Path to Graduation26
  27. 27. Percentage of Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) 3rd Grade Students Proficient Or Advanced In Reading Less than 20% 20 - 39.9% 40 - 59.9% 60 - 79.9% 80 - 100% The map shows elementary school attendance boundaries in Albuquerque Public Schools. Source: Standards Based Assessment, 2011-2012, NM Public Education Department27
  28. 28. Percentage of APS 8th Grade Students Proficient Or Advanced In Math Less than 20% 20 - 39.9% 40 - 59.9% 60 - 79.9% 80 - 100% The map shows middle school attendance boundaries in Albuquerque Public Schools.28 Source: Standards Based Assessment, 2011-2012, NM Public Education Department
  29. 29. Early Warning Indicator: Percentage Of APS Students Entering 9th Grade With One or More F Grades And 5 Or More Absences In 8th Grade Core Courses Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, School Max, 2011-2012 School Year. Data provided by APS RDA29 Department. Analysis performed by CEPR.
  30. 30. APS Four-Year High School Graduation Rate, All Students, Class of 2012 According to the Alliance for Excellent Education, there are nearly 2000 high schools nationally that graduate less than 60% of their students within four years. These schools disproportionately produce 51% of the nation’s dropouts. APS has four high schools with less than a 60% graduation rate. Source: NM Public Education Department, 4-Year Cohort High School Graduation Rate, Class of 2012. Alliance for Excellent Education statistics taken from30 http://www.all4ed.org/about_the_crisis/schools/dropout.
  31. 31. Measures Of Risk And Resiliency: Educational Aspirations, 2011 Percentage of high school students who said that they planned to go to college or some other school after high school. Students Who Plan To Continue Their Education 82% - 90% 71% - 80% 64% - 70% 55% - 60% No Data No Data Source: New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, New Mexico Departments of Health and Public Education and U.S. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, 2011. Students affirmed the statement: “I plan to go to college or some other school after high school.” NOTE: Moderately low reliability for Otero, Roosevelt, Sandoval, and Sierra Counties, unreliable data31 for Chaves County, and very low reliability for Dona Ana and Eddy Counties.
  32. 32. Percentage of APS Students Attending New Mexico Colleges Who Took Remedial Courses, 2000-2009, By Sending High School Source: “Ready For College? A Report on New Mexico’s High School Graduates Who Take Remedial Courses In College,” June 2010, New Mexico Office of Education Accountability. Data were unavailable for Volcano Vista &32 Atrisco Heritage Academy.
  33. 33. University of New Mexico Six-Year Graduation Rate, by Sending APS High School Source: UNM Office of Institutional Research. The six-year graduation rate is the percentage of first-time, full-time, degree seeking students each Fall semester who graduate with a Bachelors degree or PharmD degree, or who are enrolled in the fourth fall of the PharmD Program within six years (this is the definition of Graduation Rate as reported to the Federal Department of33 Education IPEDS system). The data reported here are for the 2004 student cohort.
  34. 34. Percentage of Individuals 25 and Older With a Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, Bernalillo County Westside Northeast Heights North Valley International Zone University/ Nob Hill South Valley Percent of Individuals With a Bachelors Degree or Higher 0% - 20.9% 21% - 39.2% 39.3% - 100%34 Source: U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates 2007 - 2011
  35. 35. Story 2: The Challenge Of Truancy35
  36. 36. Habitual Truancy Is A Problem Across New Mexico 50,929 Students Enrolled Are Enrolled In These 66 Of New Mexico’s 89 Districts: 51,034 BERNALILLO, BLOOMFIELD, LOVINGTON, TAOS, PORTALES, RUIDOSO, POJOAQUE, LAS VEGAS CITY, Students > SOCORRO, WEST LAS VEGAS, ZUNI, HATCH, TRUTH Were OR CONSEQUENCES, COBRE, RATON, TUCUMCARI, DEXTER, TULAROSA, ESTANCIA, DULCE, CUBA, Habitually PECOS, SANTA ROSA, LORDSBURG, LOVING, EUNICE, CLAYTON, TEXICO, QUESTA, CAPITAN, PEÑASCO, Truant In MORA, JEMEZ VALLEY, CIMARRON, MAGDALENA, CLOUDCROFT, HAGERMAN, CHAMA, JAL, MESA 2011-2012 VISTA, JEMEZ MOUNTAIN, MOUNTAINAIR, TATUM, FT. SUMNER, FLOYD, ANIMAS, DORA, LOGAN, SPRINGER, MELROSE, QUEMADO, CARRIZOZO, RESERVE, HONDO, SAN JON, LAKE ARTHUR, ELIDA, GRADY, VAUGHN, DES MOINES, MAXWELL, CORONA, If All These Students Were In One HOUSE, WAGON MOUND, ROY, MOSQUERO District, It Would Be The Second Largest District In New Mexico And Twice The Size of Las Cruces Source: NM Public Education Department: 2010SY 40D Enrollment by District; Habitual Truant Students By District and36 School Type 2011-2012
  37. 37. Percentage Of APS Elementary School Students Who Were Habitually Truant In 2011-2012 Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, RDA Department, 2011-2012 School Year. A student is identified as a37 Habitual Truant when the student has accumulated 10 or more days of unexcused absences.
  38. 38. Percentage Of APS Middle School Students Who Were Habitually Truant In 2011-2012 Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, RDA Department, 2011-2012 School Year. A student is identified as a38 Habitual Truant when the student has accumulated 10 or more days of unexcused absences.
  39. 39. Percentage Of APS High School Students Who Were Habitually Truant In 2011-2012 Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, RDA Department, 2011-2012 School Year. A student is identified as a39 Habitual Truant when the student has accumulated 10 or more days of unexcused absences.
  40. 40. Story 3: Risk And Resiliency40
  41. 41. The New Mexico Youth Risk & Resiliency Survey (YRRS) • The YRRS is part of the CDC Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) and is conducted by the New Mexico Departments of Health and Public Education with the assistance of the Prevention Research Center in the UNM School of Medicine. • The YRRS is an important survey that examines risk behaviors and resiliency (protective) factors of New Mexico high school and middle school students. • The RISK behaviors covered include alcohol and drug use, unintentional injury, violence, suicidal ideation, tobacco use, sexual activity, physical activity and nutrition. • The RESILIENCY factors covered include relationships in the family, school, community, and with peers; participation in sports, clubs, other group activities, and hobbies; and health status issues. Sources: www.youthrisk.org. Green D, Peñaloza L, and FitzGerald C. 2012. New Mexico Youth Risk & Resiliency Survey: High School Survey Results 2011. Epidemiology and Response Division, New Mexico Department of Health, School and Family41 Support Bureau, New Mexico Public Education Department, and University of New Mexico Prevention Research Center.
  42. 42. Percentage Of Middle School Students Who Seriously Considered Attempting Suicide Source: New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, 2009, New Mexico Departments of Health and Public Education and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Students were asked, “During the past 12 months, did you ever seriously consider attempting suicide?” The percentage reported here reflects42 respondents who answered “Yes.”
  43. 43. Percentage Of High School Students Who Were In A Physical Fight On School Property Source: New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, 2009, New Mexico Departments of Health and Public Education and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Students were asked, “During the past 12 months, how many times were you in a physical fight on school property?” The percentage reported here43 reflects respondents who answered one or more times.
  44. 44. Percentage Of APS High School Students Who Reported Using Heroin, Cocaine, Or Meth At Least Once In Their Lives20% 19%18% 17% 16% 16%16% 15% 14% 14%14% 13% 13% 13% 13% 13%12% 11% 11% 11% 10%10% 9% 9% 9% 9% 9% 9% 8% 8% 8% 8% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2% 0% Heroin Cocaine Methamphetamine Source: APS and state high school data taken from New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, 2009. Students were asked the following three questions: “During your life, how many times have you used any form of cocaine, including powder, crack, or freebase?” “During your life, how many times have you used heroin (also called smack, junk, or China White)?” “During your life, how many times have you used methamphetamines (also called speed, crystal, crank, or ice)?” The percentages reported here reflect respondents who reported using the given drug one or more times.44 National data taken from High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2009, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.
  45. 45. Percentage of Students Who Report Not Having A Parent Or Adult At Home Who Is Interested In Their School Work Source: New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, 2009. Students were asked to comment on the statement, “In my home, there is a parent or some other adult who is interested in my school work.” The percentage reported here45 reflects respondents who answered, “Not true at all.”
  46. 46. Key Outcomes Of High School Students Experiencing High & Low Levels Of Caring And Supportive Relationships With Parents, New Mexico, 2009 60% 53.4% 50% 40.5% 40% 36.6% 34.8% 34.3% 30.7% 30% 24.3% 25.3% 21.4% 19.7% 20% 18.3% 10.9% 10% 4.9% 3.5% 0% Cigarette Binge Marijuana Cocaine Suicide (past Physical Overweight Smokers Drinkers Users Users 12 months) Fight or Obese Students Experiencing High Levels of Care Students Experiencing Low Levels of Care Source: New Mexico Epidemiology, 2010. (http://nmhealth.org/erd/HealthData/pdf/ER%20YRRS%20092410.pdf).46 National data taken from High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2009, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.
  47. 47. ANALYSIS Making Sense Of The Data47
  48. 48. Change Across The Cradle-To-Career Continuum48
  49. 49. Habitual Truancy In APS Elementary, Middle, And High Schools Elementary School Percent Habitually Truant Students 0.4% - 5% 5.1% - 10% 10.1% - 20% Middle School Greater than 20% high High School These maps show truancy moving like a red tide that engulfs Albuquerque Public Schools students by the time they are in high school. Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, RDA Department, 2011-2012 School Year. A student is identified as a49 Habitual Truant when the student has accumulated 10 or more days of unexcused absences.
  50. 50. Identifying Gaps In Resources50
  51. 51. Percentage Of High School Students Who Have Had Sexual Intercourse Source: New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, 2009, New Mexico Departments of Health and Public Education and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Students were asked, “During your life, with how many people have you had sexual intercourse?” The percentage reported here reflects respondents51 who answered one or more people.
  52. 52. Teen Birth Rate, Ages 15-19 The data point in each census tract represents the number of live births to teen women per 1000 teen women, over the period 2001- 2005. For example, the census tract in the center with a teen birth rate of 106.4 means that there were 106 live births to teen women for every 1000 teen women who live in the census tract. Source: New Mexico Community Data Collaborative. The rates shown here reflects the average number of children per 1000 women born to teen mothers (ages 15-19) between 2001 and 2005. Rates are reported by census tract; high school boundaries are overlaid to provide perspective. In 2005, the statewide teen birth rate was 62 per 1000,52 and the nationwide rate was 40 per 1000 (Kids Count Data Center, http://datacenter.kidscount.org).
  53. 53. Capacity Of 4- And 5-Star Licensed Child Care Centers Above national average Source: New Mexico Community Data Collaborative, December 2010. Enrollment data are reported by53 program site. Elementary school boundaries are overlaid to provide perspective.
  54. 54. Exploring Visual Correlations54
  55. 55. Relationship Between Elementary Grades And Elementary Student Mobility Elementary School Grades ! ( A ! ( B ! ( C ! ( D ! ( FWhat is Elementary School Mobilitygoing on 5.2% - 12.7%with 12.8% - 19.2% 19.3% - 25%these 25.1% - 33%schools? 33.1% - 53.2% 33.1% - 53.2% Grey outlines show elementary school attendance boundaries. Source: School grades from New Mexico Public Education Department website55 http://webapp2.ped.state.nm.us/SchoolData/SchoolGrading.aspx.
  56. 56. Are These Schools Beating the Odds? Graduation Rate > 70%, Remediation Rate At UNM < 30%, Child Poverty > 30% Total School Enrollment Graduation Remediation High School (2011-2012) Rate Rate Chaparral High 1,080 77.8% 25.0% Logan High 127 86.6% 16.7% Magdalena High 127 72.9% 28.6% Mosquero High 27 98.0% 0.0% Tularosa High 273 86.5% 14.3% Percent of Children in Poverty in District 0% - 10% 11% - 21% 22% - 30% 31% - 39% 40% - 51%56
  57. 57. Setting Priorities57
  58. 58. Creating Indices • The previous maps have demonstrated the power of viewing single and multiple variables on a map. An index combines multiple variables and provides a means of ranking these in an objective way. • Indices can support decisions about where to allocate funds and focus resources. • Indices can focus attention on negative (risk) factors, or positive (opportunity) factors. • The Kirwan Institute1 at Ohio State University and The Trust for Public Land2 have both used index mapping to compel community conversation and action in relation to urban planning issues. 1Reece , Jason, Christy Rogers, Matt Martin, Liz Colombo, Dwight Holley, Melissa Lindsjo (2012), Neighborhoods and Community Development in Franklin County, Kirwan Institute, Ohio State University. 2Trust for Public Land, http://oregonexplorer.info/deschutes/MappingTools/GreenprintMaps58
  59. 59. Child Maltreatment Risk Factors And Opportunity Mapping In Bernalillo County The CDC has identified several factors related to high risk for child maltreatment. The following maps show areas where risks for these factors are lower and higher in Bernalillo County. The goal is to introduce a possible technique for identifying neighborhoods that may benefit from resources. • The best opportunity for children to grow up without becoming victims of maltreatment include: – Having parents with higher education levels; – Living in a household with 2 parents; – Living in a household with income above poverty level; – Living in a household with fewer dependent children; – Living in neighborhoods with low unemployment; – Living in neighborhoods where people have lived at least a year in the same house; – Living in neighborhoods with a lower density of alcohol outlets. Where are these areas in Bernalillo County? Source: http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/childmaltreatment/riskprotectivefactors.html59
  60. 60. Individual Child Maltreatment Risk Mitigation Factors Education Greater Than AA Degree Few Single Parent Households Few Families Living Under Poverty Level Low Residential Mobility Low Unemployment Smaller Family Size Few Alcohol Licenses Source: Unemployment, family size, single parent household, household mobility, family poverty model input layers from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Decennial Census, census tract level. Alcohol license data from New Mexico Community60 Data Collaborative, compiled by New Mexico Department of Health.
  61. 61. Opportunity For A Safe Childhood Westside Northeast Heights North Valley Based on the CDC factors, International Zone tracts with a higher score have fewer University/ Nob Hill child maltreatment indicators. South Valley Opportunity Score High Moderately high Average Moderately low Low Low Source: Unemployment, family size, single parent household, household mobility, family poverty model input layers from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Decennial Census , census tract level. Alcohol license data from New Mexico Community Data61 Collaborative, compiled by New Mexico Department of Health.
  62. 62. Using The Maps To Address Issues Of Community Equity: Where Are The Hispanic Children In Relation To Opportunity? Westside This map clearly shows the Northeast Heights concentration of Hispanic children North Valley under the age of 5 in International Zone lower opportunity areas. University/ Nob Hill Opportunity Score High South Valley Moderately high Average Moderately low Low Number of Hispanic Low Children Under Age 5 4 - 85 86 - 185 BerncoTr 186 - 325 326 - 525 526 - 761 Source: Unemployment, family size, single parent household, household mobility, family poverty model input layers from the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Decennial Census , census tract level. Alcohol license data from New Mexico Community Data62 Collaborative, compiled by New Mexico Department of Health.
  63. 63. Measuring Impact63
  64. 64. Percentage Of APS High School Students Who Were Habitually Truant In 2011-2012 Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, RDA Department, 2011-2012 School Year. A student is identified as a64 Habitual Truant when the student has accumulated 10 or more days of unexcused absences.
  65. 65. Change In Percentage Of APS High School Students Who Were Habitually Truant 2010-2011 To 2011-2012 Source: Albuquerque Public Schools, RDA Department. A student is identified as a Habitual Truant when the65 student has accumulated 10 or more days of unexcused absences.
  66. 66. APS Four-Year High School Graduation Rate, All Students, Class Of 2012 According to the Alliance for Excellent Education, there are nearly 2000 high schools nationally that graduate less than 60% of their students within four years. These schools disproportionately produce 51% of the nation’s dropouts. APS has four high schools with less than a 60% graduation rate. Source: NM Public Education Department, 4-Year Cohort High School Graduation Rate, Class of 2012. Alliance for Excellent Education statistics taken from http://www.all4ed.org/about_the_crisis/schools/dropout.66
  67. 67. Change In APS High School Graduation Rate 2010-2011 To 2011-2012 Change in Graduation Rate, 2011-2012 -4.1 - -2.0 (Large Decrease) -1.9 - 0.0 (Small Decrease) 0.1 - 2.0 (Small Increase) 2.1 - 12.0 (Large Increase) Data Not Available Data Not Available67 Source: NM Public Education Department, 4-Year Cohort High School Graduation Rate.
  68. 68. ACTION Using Data For Change68
  69. 69. How The Maps Have Supported Action • Developing State Policy • Early Childhood • Truancy • Dual Credit • Afterschool • Engaging Community, Building Relationships & Mapping Assets • Mission: Graduate • The Unidos Project for Latino Student Success69
  70. 70. 60,000 NEW DEGREES BY 202070
  71. 71. • Goal: To add 60,000 new associate’s, bachelor’s, or graduate degrees by 2020. • Objectives: 1. Eliminate achievement gaps. 2. Increase high school graduation rates. 3. Increase college and university enrollment. 4. Increase college and university graduation rates. 5. Align these education objectives with economic growth and ensure that all graduates have local opportunities for gainful employment.71
  72. 72. Percentage of Individuals with Income Less than 185% of the Federal Poverty Level72 Source: U.S. Census 2010, American Community Survey, 2006-2010 Five-Year Estimates.
  73. 73. Four-Year High School Graduation Rate, All Students73 Source: NM Public Education Department, 4-Year Cohort High School Graduation Rate, Class of 2012.
  74. 74. Four-Year High School Graduation Rate, Hispanic Students74 Source: NM Public Education Department, 4-Year Cohort High School Graduation Rate, Class of 2012.
  75. 75. Educational Attainment In Central New Mexico Adults 25 And Over, With An Associate’s, Bachelor’s, Or Graduate Degree, 2011 Less than 19.4% 19.4 - 32.8% 32.8 - 42.2% 42.2 - 55.6% 55.6 - 78.0% 45 38.8 37.2 40 35.8 35 32.8 30 25 23.2 20.3 20 15 10 5 075 Source: U.S. Census, American Community Survey 2011, 5-Year Estimates
  76. 76. How Does Albuquerque Compare to Other Communities? Percentage of the Population, 25-64 Years of Age, With an Associates Degree or Higher San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metro Area 54.3% Raleigh-Cary, NC Metro Area 52.5% Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA Metro Area 48.1% Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX Metro Area 47.3% Colorado Springs, CO Metro Area 46.1% Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA Metro Area 43.6% Salt Lake City, UT Metro Area 40.3% Ogden-Clearfield, UT Metro Area 40.2% Tucson, AZ Metro Area 38.6% Albuquerque, NM Metro Area 38.0% Oklahoma City, OK Metro Area 35.4% Tulsa, OK Metro Area 35.3% Reno-Sparks, NV Metro Area 35.2% Las Vegas-Paradise, NV Metro Area 29.6% El Paso, TX Metro Area 27.8% McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX Metro Area 20.9% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0%76 Source: U.S. Census, American Community Survey 2010, 5-Year Estimates.
  77. 77. February 2013 The Unidos Project for Latino Student Success Getting to the Big Goal in Albuquerque by 202577
  78. 78. The Unidos Acequia Metaphor: Four Strategic Focus Areas 1. Opening the Gate: Redefining and Scaling Up Services to Support Students and Families (Abriendo La Compuerta) 2. Increasing the Flow: Helping Students and Families Understand the Transformational Power of Education (Aumentando La Corriente) 3. Reclaiming the Flow: Bringing Students Back (Recuperando La Corriente) 4. Removing Barriers: Institutional Development to Facilitate Seamless Transitions (La Limpia) Photo credit: New Mexico Acequia Association, http://www.lasacequias.org/78
  79. 79. Our ProsperityDepends On Our City’sAbility To Cultivate Its Most Precious Resources79
  80. 80. QUESTIONS?80
  81. 81. For More Information Peter Winograd, Ph.D. (pkwinograd@yahoo.com) Angelo J. Gonzales, Ph.D. (ajg47@unm.edu) Amy Ballard (aballard@unm.edu) Laura Robison (lrobison@unm.edu) Jason Timm (jtimm@unm.edu) Center for Education Policy Research The University of New Mexico http://cepr.unm.edu81

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