2010 Chatham Square Case Study In Healthy Neighborhood Approaches To Community Development

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Updated presentation on the use of relational culture organizing in community development work

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  • How came to know about the Healthy Neighborhood Approach, friendship with Marcia and Michael and winning the Community Loan Fund award ~ through telling story, not output statistics – Announce joint to tell Barbara walking group story.
  • Leaders from Perkins Street know Leaders from Clinton Avenue. Leaders from Pine know leaders on Lombard Avenue.
  • Leaders from Perkins Street know Leaders from Clinton Avenue. Leaders from Pine know leaders on Lombard Avenue. Introduce Kevin and ask him to speak about Relational Culture and the work of the Connecticut Sponsoring Committee.
  • Building on the successful partnership between Atwater Blockwatch and the Mary Wade Home was an important part of getting Mary Wade Home to see the CSNA as a partner. This partnership helped us find Sherese. I’ll tell you about Sherese a little later when we talk about the neighborhood market
  • Tell attempts to deal with drugs story and how by trying to deal with an impossible to deal with problem we made it go away as a barrier to getting other things done in the neighborhood.
  • Photography program story link to exhibit and then to the card for the TCF 80 th .
  • Channel 8 covering Walk to School day but with so many resident out and the neighborhood looking good they covered the neighborhood and referred to it as Chatham Square Neighborhood. Front page on a Sunday of the Festival, Art page coverage of the photo exhibit. The children and needless to say the parents were beaming.
  • Getting the city to fix the water and lights in the park by focusing on the Festival, not the lights and the water ~ mayor visits Chatham Square in 2008 and does not speak, just listens and watches. Front page on a Sunday of the Festival, Art page coverage of the photo exhibit. The children and needless to say the parents were beaming.
  • LCI approaches us about home repairs for the lower income homeowners
  • Story ~ from Erin to Gerda to Robert Smuts to Dan burden
  • Does this REALLY work? House number 1 went to a couple of Yale graduate student, the realtor attributed the closing to information he got on our tour. House number 2 went to a single mom, a nurse’s aide who works at the local home for the elderly. She is bringing up her kids, down the street from the housing project where she grew up, in her house own house. She rents the 2 nd apartment to her dad. House number 3 went to young couple with a baby, he teaches elementary school, she does diabetes research at Yale. Their dream, to convert the house back to a one family as their family grows. Sorry of Fran getting them to come to the neighborhood. All 3 deemed fully qualified by a reputable mortgage provider.
  • House number 1 went to a couple of Yale graduate student, the realtor attributed the closing to information he got on our tour. Tell Sherese story and Joan Bossan Heenan story House number 2 went to a single mom, a nurse’s aide who works at the local home for the elderly. She is bringing up her kids, down the street from the housing project where she grew up, in her house own house. She rents the 2 nd apartment to her dad. House number 3 young couple, he teaches elementary school, she does research at Yale, they have a 7 month old baby. Their dream, to convert the house back to a one family as their family grows. All 3 deemed fully qualified by a reputable mortgage provider.
  • Again I ask, does this work?
  • More people believe the neighborhood is great less people in all other categories, City of New Haven picks Neighborhood for 1 st year of participation in International “Walk to School” Day and Channel 8 mentions Chatham Square Neighborhood for the first time EVER.
  • Trend shows us that residents think that the neighbor hood’s reputation is changing toward the positive
  • This slide shows us the same tendency but what is important to note is the decrease in the bad and terrible. This is the results of investments in the houses, by our program and by homeowners.
  • More people are using the park. Increases in use of park daily or weekly. What is powerful is the Barbara Women’s walking group … story. And speaking of statistic tell how we came to work with CARE at Yale School of Public Health and the money that will come from that partnership.
  • Re- Introduce Kevin to tall about West River
  • 2010 Chatham Square Case Study In Healthy Neighborhood Approaches To Community Development

    1. 1. <ul><li>Case Study in the Healthy Neighborhood Approach </li></ul><ul><li>to Community Development </li></ul>Chatham Square June 2010
    2. 2. <ul><li>Longitudinal study of urban neighborhoods & crime </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local governments should support the development of cooperative efforts in low-income neighborhoods by encouraging neighbors to meet and work together </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most important influence on a neighborhood's crime rate is neighbors' willingness to act for one another's benefit, and particularly for the benefit of neighborhood children </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Cities that sow community gardens may reap a harvest of not only kale and tomatoes, but safer neighborhoods and healthier children” * </li></ul></ul>Theoretical Base Dr. Felton Earls *Crime as Science (A Neighbor at a Time) Dan Hurley NYT Jan. 8, 2004 article on: Neighborhoods and violent crime: A multilevel study of collective efficacy. Science, 277:918-924 Sampson R, Raudenbush SW, and Earls F. (1997).
    3. 3. <ul><li>Image : Residents are confident about the future of the neighborhood and outsiders think it’s a good place to live and work, even if they choose not to live there </li></ul><ul><li>Physical Conditions : Private property reinvestment; “in-between” properties (neither obviously public nor private) are in a high state of repair (i.e. curb strips, planter boxes) </li></ul><ul><li>Neighborhood Management : Neighbors manage change and threats; problems that arise are solved; public institutions are held accountable and are accountable; detrimental behaviors are considered outside the “norm” and are curtailed </li></ul><ul><li>Market : Ideally demand exceeds supply; in-movers need to be at least as good or better for the neighborhood as out-movers while quality housing opportunities for people of modest means are maintained </li></ul>Framework Healthy Neighborhood Approach Fall Creek Consulting – Health Neighborhood Group: http://www.fallcreekconsultants.com/healthy_neighborhoods.php
    4. 4. <ul><li>Key Components </li></ul><ul><li>Real Estate Market: barometer of neighborhood health </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make neighborhoods places where it makes economic sense for people to invest time, money and energy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resident Participation: residents participate in the real estate market instead of protected from it </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Affordable housing as a tool for revitalization </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Quality of Life Indicators: progress measured by tracking neighborhood confidence, not units of housing produced or people served </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Outcomes not Outputs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Self-Definition: residents define outcomes while practitioners offer insight, strategies and tools to get there </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work toward achieving outcomes not delivering programs </li></ul></ul>Framework cont’d Healthy Neighborhood Approach Fall Creek Consulting – Health Neighborhood Group: http://www.fallcreekconsultants.com/healthy_neighborhoods.php
    5. 5. <ul><li>Key Elements </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders and participants get to know each other beyond tasks and agendas </li></ul><ul><li>People engaged around their own interests </li></ul><ul><li>People who know and trust each are more likely to act in each others’ interests </li></ul><ul><li>Community is made stronger through increased social capital investments </li></ul>Methodology “ Relational Culture” Organizing Sustainable Action: Planting the Seeds of Relational Organizing - Rev. Louise Green
    6. 6. <ul><li>Community Foundation goals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased urban neighborhood stabilization and revitalization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development replicable strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Knocked on doors; got to know residents and community </li></ul><ul><li>Introduced relational culture organizing and healthy neighborhood approach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities, including meetings, are means to the end of getting to know other residents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities are outcome focused: improved image and/or physical condition, impact market, manage issues </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Center of relationships: “place” not problem </li></ul>Getting Started
    7. 7. Neighborhood Fair Haven, New Haven
    8. 8. Neighborhood Fair Haven, New Haven Chatham Square Downtown
    9. 9. <ul><li>3,500 people </li></ul><ul><li>1,100 households </li></ul><ul><li>42% Hispanic </li></ul><ul><li>Median Income $33k </li></ul><ul><li>Solid housing stock, mostly 2 and 3 family structures </li></ul>Market / Community Descriptors 2000 census data
    10. 10. Market / Community Descriptors 2007 Atwater Street Block Party
    11. 11. Community Analysis What Needs Work <ul><li>Drug sales out of houses and at the park </li></ul><ul><li>Houses in need of repair </li></ul><ul><li>Homeownership: lower than city average south and west of park </li></ul><ul><li>Public infrastructure (sidewalks, park, public lighting) </li></ul><ul><li>Street litter, especially on the Clinton Avenue side of the park </li></ul><ul><li>Traffic flow and noise </li></ul>
    12. 12. Community Analysis
    13. 13. Community Analysis What Deserves Recognition <ul><li>Committed residents </li></ul><ul><li>Diverse community (cultural, economic, ethnic, racial) </li></ul><ul><li>Five parks and three gardens </li></ul><ul><li>Historic buildings ~ residential and commercial </li></ul><ul><li>Great 2 and 3 family housing stock </li></ul><ul><li>Home-Buyer Incentive prgs: Yale & Mary Wade Home </li></ul><ul><li>Proximity to bus routes, highway, waterfront, parks </li></ul><ul><li>Three local grocery stores </li></ul><ul><li>Two commercial corridors </li></ul><ul><li>Rehabbed Housing Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Elderly services ~ Mary Wade Home </li></ul>
    14. 14. Resident-Developed Work Plan Community-approved plan January 2007
    15. 15. Results: Image
    16. 16. Results: Image <ul><li>Image: Residents are confident about the future of the neighborhood, </li></ul><ul><li>and outsiders think it’s a good place to live and work, even if they </li></ul><ul><li>choose not to live there </li></ul><ul><li>Neighborhood branded – 15 positive hits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Channel 3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Channel 8 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Haven Register </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Haven Independent </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Festival in partnership with the City of New Haven </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s photo exhibit (6-11 years)* </li></ul>* Unless otherwise noted pictures in this presentation were made by neighborhood children ages 6-11
    17. 17. Results: Physical Condition
    18. 18. Results: Physical Condition <ul><li>Physical Conditions: Private property reinvestment; “in-between” </li></ul><ul><li>properties (neither obviously public nor private) are in a high state of </li></ul><ul><li>repair (i.e. curb strips, planter boxes) </li></ul><ul><li>38 homes repaired through incentive program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnership with homeowners and HRI </li></ul></ul><ul><li>6 homes repaired w/o program assistance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Investing made sense to homeowners </li></ul></ul><ul><li>4 lower income homeowners offered assistance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnership with homeowners and City of New Haven </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2 Parks rec’d combined public-private support for repairs and upgrades </li></ul><ul><li>1st Bicycle lane in the neighborhood </li></ul>
    19. 19. Results: Management Pictures: New Haven Independent
    20. 20. Results: Management <ul><li>Neighborhood Management: Neighbors manage change and threats; </li></ul><ul><li>problems that arise are solved; public institutions are held </li></ul><ul><li>accountable and are accountable; detrimental behaviors are </li></ul><ul><li>considered outside the “norm” and are curtailed </li></ul><ul><li>Community-identified problem: traffic speed, safety </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Community raised funds locally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Foundation matched and donated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>City matched combined total </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National expert Dan Burden of Glatting, Jackson, Kercher Anglin, Inc. conducts traffic calming study </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>City recv’d $377,000 Federal Grant based on study in 2009 </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Results: Market “ Darden said her plans are to stay in the neighborhood, get her kids enrolled in the local schools, do some home fix up. Her career plans now call for her to stay at Mary Wade, of course; she is also going to get her registered nurse’s degree, too.” (2) (2) Quote and Photo: NH Independent “ The information I learned on the tour of Chatham Square contributed directly to the sale of a house on Atwater Street”--Bruce Peterson, Realtor, H. Pearce Realtors (1) (1) Photo: 149 Clinton Avenue from MLS listings
    22. 22. Results: Market <ul><li>Market: Ideally demand exceeds supply; in-movers need to be at least </li></ul><ul><li>as good or better for the neighborhood as out-movers while quality </li></ul><ul><li>housing opportunities for people of modest means are maintained </li></ul><ul><ul><li>14 realtors attended neighborhood tours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 home purchases totaling $700,000+ in sales directly connected to the neighborhood association </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As of 2009, nine houses purchased with estimated combined market value over $2 million. </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Resident Survey <ul><li>Baseline Survey: October 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-up Survey: September 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>40 resident participants </li></ul><ul><li>1/3 survey participants are residents who attend neighborhood meetings </li></ul><ul><li>2/3 self-selected (festival attendees and door knocking ) </li></ul>
    24. 24. Neighborhood Quality of Life
    25. 25. Neighborhood Image
    26. 26. Neighborhood Physical Condition
    27. 27. Use of Chatham Square park
    28. 28. Lessons Learned <ul><li>Identify leaders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People who get others to follow </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Build on success </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Look for assets to build on, not problems to solve </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resident perspective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connect their dreams to your expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Collect and disseminate the success-affirming stories </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Be the bearer of the good news </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New possibilities for work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Linked to new people or new energy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Measure Success by outcomes, not output </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality of life, not quantity of program </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Conclusions <ul><li>Worthwhile investment: $80k/yr for 3 years investment has thus far yielded $2,617,000 in private and public investments and donations, includes home purchases </li></ul><ul><li>Replicable and Sustainable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Currently working in West River and & Hill North neighborhoods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainability : www.chathamsquare.ning.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keys to Success </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work on “place” not problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnerships between residents, realtors, local businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Needs : More study, consistent funding and tax incentives </li></ul>
    30. 30. Chatham Square: Conclusions

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