Training Manual for OpenTable Tier 1
Support
Version 1.0
13th May 2014
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 2
Document Overview
Welcome to OpenTable Tier I Support Training !
This do...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 3
Hardware Part 1 – Review the Hardware Part 1 and 2 Document
Hardware Par...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 4
Flapping
FRN – False Reserve Nows
Single NATs
Double NATs
Triple NATs
Fi...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 5
Training Overview
Welcome to the Customer Support training! Throughout t...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 6
Table of Contents
1 Day 1 – Overview of OpenTable and standards on custo...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 7
1 Day 1 – Overview of OpenTable and standards on customer care
Topic Ove...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 8
OpenTable has more than 31,000 restaurant customers, and since its incep...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 9
Both, restaurants and diners are OpenTable customers.
OpenTable caters t...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 10
How does OpenTable work?
Restaurants purchase one of our restaurant pro...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 11
35% of bookers dine out at least once a week in white-tablecloth restau...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 12
Restaurants’ Products
Electronic Reservation Book (ERB)
Flagship produc...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 13
Where restaurants can view their cover reports & billing statements
Whe...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 14
Gift cards available for purchase by diners
Accepted only at certain Op...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 15
55% of customers would pay extra to guarantee a better service – Defaqt...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 16
Empathy - Empathic people are emotionally generous, someone who enthusi...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 17
Handling Assertive / Demanding customers
Listen so that you will unders...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 18
Listen!! Let the caller vent. After the caller is finished complaining,...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 19
Have caller repeat information back to you
Make sure callers are aware ...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 20
Convince the customer that it is in her/his best interest to let you he...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 21
Be the customers advocate and be supportive of the customer’s needs.
As...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 22
Identify the positive: Find something significant that we CAN do for th...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 23
Apologize
Acknowledge the mistake
Take ownership for the resolution and...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 24
Apologize if appropriate and be sure to tell the customer what you CAN ...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 25
Use phrases like:
I am not able to view your record.
My system is movin...
OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual
Page | 26
Tips for defusing stress
Breathe - Deep breathing is one of the oldest ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Tier i support_intro_day1_1

781 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
781
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
296
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Tier i support_intro_day1_1

  1. 1. Training Manual for OpenTable Tier 1 Support Version 1.0 13th May 2014
  2. 2. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 2 Document Overview Welcome to OpenTable Tier I Support Training ! This document details out the training plan and the training content for the Tier I Support Team. This document is divided into different chapters, each chapter deals with a single day’s training. The proposed agenda is as follows – Day 1 What is OpenTable Make your own reservation What are Diners Restaurant Jargon Empathy – Call Flow and what’s Expected Day 2 OpenTable Electronic Reservation Book (In Depth Look) (Flex Mode Quick Reference Guide Review) Software - Flex Day 3 Finish Software – Flex (In Depth) Software – Slot (In Depth) – Hands on Build your own Restaurant Listen to calls if time is left Day 4 Go over OpenTable Tools Wiki – Have the agents login to the WIKI and explain how to use it. Allow them time to search for items that have been previously covered in training ROMS Roms – Cover User Edition Roms Word Doc- CHARMS OtRestaurant.com Crash RAT SuperNut QA Audit Form (Show them the Audit Form and Review) Call Flow Sample (Listen to a call and grade it using the audit form) C-Sats Day 5
  3. 3. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 3 Hardware Part 1 – Review the Hardware Part 1 and 2 Document Hardware Part 2 - Review the Hardware Part 1 and 2 Document Creating your own Hardware Ticket – Hands On ROS Overview Proper Notes & Login Calls How To Handoff Tickets (Review CR Hand off List) IPad App / Remote Manager (IPAD Remote Manager Training PPT) OTC – OpenTable Connect - otconnect.com (In Depth Look) Listen to calls if time is left Day 6 OpenTables Different Software Folders In Depth look at OTConfig Folder Backups Setup Software OTA – OpenTable Anywhere – otanywhere.opentable.com How To Troubleshoot - UAC How To Install How It Works OTD – OpenTable Desktop How To Troubleshoot How To install How it Works Multi Session Repair / Verify on the ERB Day 7 Introduction to Network Basic Troubleshooting Windows Chasms.com Modemhelp.net Portforward.com VNC Hopping Source IP Filtering Rouge ERB Start Connections: Back Soons (Review PNG Back Soon Flowchart) Day 8 Finish Connections:
  4. 4. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 4 Flapping FRN – False Reserve Nows Single NATs Double NATs Triple NATs Firewall Windows Firewall OpenTables Firewall McAfee Host Intrusion McAfee Hip Score How to run a reservation report Manual Auto Listen to calls if time is left Day 9 Windows Services POS Integration A look at tier 2 Partners – (Quick Overview – Review Partner List) DudaMobile Locu Foodspotting TableScout- OT Gifts Savored Spotlight BrainTree (Brain Tree PPT) FishBowl HelpDesk Five9Training Review Anything the class feels they need more information on Listen to calls if time is left Day 10 Review Test Take Test Review Hipchat Graduation
  5. 5. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 5 Training Overview Welcome to the Customer Support training! Throughout this document, you will encounter the following symbols, which are used to mark different types of information: Plan for the day Objectives / Guiding questions Core Knowledge Discussions / Role Play / Assignment Recap / Review / Quick Test Trivia
  6. 6. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 6 Table of Contents 1 Day 1 – Overview of OpenTable and standards on customer care ......................................................7
  7. 7. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 7 1 Day 1 – Overview of OpenTable and standards on customer care Topic Overview Overview of OpenTable Aspects Covered  What is OpenTable? o How did OpenTable come into being? o Who are the Customers of OpenTable? o How does OpenTable work? o Who relies on OpenTable? o What products are available as part of OpenTable?  What are OpenTable’s Customer Service Standards? Outcome At the end of the day, the trainee should be aware of OpenTable as an Organization, as a product and the standards that are used. Plan for the day Topic Time What is OpenTable? 0.5 hours Product Overview 1 hour Customer Care Standards 0.5 hours Dealing with Different Customers 3 hours Exercises 2 hours Core Knowledge – What is OpenTable? What is OpenTable? OpenTable (http://www.opentable.com) is the leading provider of free, real-time online restaurant reservations for diners, and reservation and guest management solutions for restaurants. Not only does this help diners reserve a table for a fine dining experience, but it also enables restaurants to manage their reservation book, streamline their operations and enhance their service levels. The company is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and the OpenTable service is available throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan, Mexico, and parts of Europe.
  8. 8. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 8 OpenTable has more than 31,000 restaurant customers, and since its inception in 1998, has seated more than 575 million diners around the world. OpenTable is also a proud supporter of Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry program, which is working to end childhood hunger in America by ensuring that all children get the healthy food they need, every day. How did OpenTable come into being? OpenTable was founded in 1998 by Chuck Templeton, a former marketer who observed the difficulty his wife faced while trying to book a dinner reservation by phone. It took his wife 3.5 hours to book a reservation that night, and Chuck came away with the idea to build a website that could hook up to back-end restaurant reservation terminals. At the time, restaurant reservation terminals didn’t really exist, so Chuck decided to build that too. Today, OpenTable is 700 people strong and headquartered in San Francisco, CA. The company is lead by Matt Roberts, CEO, with offices and teams all over the globe. The company trades on the NASDAQ under the symbol “OPEN.” Foodspotting, an app for finding and sharing food photos, and Rezbook, a reservation management system for restaurants formerly owned and operated by Urbanspoon, are also part of the OpenTable family. OpenTable has nearly 600 partners, including Bing, Facebook, Google, TripAdvisor, Urbanspoon, Yahoo!, Yelp, and Zagat. In aggregate, partners account for 5 to 10 percent of diners seated each month via OpenTable. OpenTable went public on May 21, 2009 and is traded on NASDAQ under the symbol OPEN. Who are OpenTable’s Customers?
  9. 9. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 9 Both, restaurants and diners are OpenTable customers. OpenTable caters to all types of restaurants, right from the small, family-owned restaurants to fine- dining restaurants as well as large restaurant groups. Some notable restaurants that OpenTable caters to are – Ruth’s Chris Steak House Gordon Ramsay The French Laundry Colicchio & Sons The Gramercy Tavern Morton’s Steakhouse OpenTable also services a varied range of diners – from casual diners to value-driven diners and even VIP diners.
  10. 10. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 10 How does OpenTable work? Restaurants purchase one of our restaurant products (hardware & software) OpenTable sends an employee out to the restaurant’s location to get the system installed and the restaurant trained on how to use. Once installed, the restaurant’s profile is added to the OpenTable Network (website). Diners can book at participating restaurants using www.opentable.com, or through our iOS or Android applications. Restaurants can also deploy a widget to their website that allows diners to book reservations from their website via the OpenTable software. Restaurants are charged a subscription for the cost of the software, and then are billed on a per- cover basis Who relies on OpenTable? Trivia / Fun facts 26% of reservations made online are done between 10pm and 9am, when most restaurants are closed OpenTable. com Diners Hosts WaitersKitchens Owners
  11. 11. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 11 35% of bookers dine out at least once a week in white-tablecloth restaurants 81% of bookers dine out at least once a month Average age: 42 Average household income: $122,000 Peak reservation making time is approx 12pm-1pm… exactly the time a restaurant is least likely wanting to be contacted by guests (lunchtime rush, etc.) Non-OT average no-show rate: 15% || OpenTable’s no-show rate: 5% Restaurant Jargon 2-top -- A party of 2 people. A 4 top is a party of 4 people, etc.. Also known as a duece . Cover -- A person seated in the restaurant. A reservation for a party of 4 = 4 covers No-Show -- A party that does not show up and does not call to cancel Turn Time -- The length of time it takes a party to dine; standard industry turn times are 1 ½ hours for a 2-top, 2 hours for a 4-top, and 2.5 hours for a 6-top or larger. VIP -- Very Important Person Guest - Not a Customer - Restaurant terminology. Core Knowledge – OpenTable Product Overview OpenTable is not just a software, it is a partner to our Restaurants and is a resource for our diners. Satisfied diners as well as satisfied restaurants play a key role in making us a success. Satisfied diners seek more restaurants, and satisfied restaurants seek more diners. Each views OpenTable through the eyes of their own unique set of products designed to enhance the user experience. Diners recognize the OpenTable brand from our website and consumer apps, as well as our branding on partner restaurant and review sites and our gifts product, all of which are designed to greatly enhance their dining experience from discovery through follow up. Restaurants mostly associate the OpenTable brand with our variety of products used to deliver reservations and valuable diners from our network, also designed to enhance the diner experience by delivering tools to hand the diner experience to the host and staff. Below is a quick overview of the products that OpenTable offers its customers. (Details of each product are available later in the chapter).
  12. 12. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 12 Restaurants’ Products Electronic Reservation Book (ERB) Flagship product, used by 22,000+ restaurants Combination of hardware (physical computer server) and software. The hardware is either leased to restaurants, or they purchase it outright. Must be installed at the restaurant by an OpenTable employee NOT A WEB BASED PRODUCT - Functional without internet. ERB Companion Products OpenTable Anywhere, OpenTable Desktop, and Launcher are companions to the ERB that allows users to access their ERB from almost any computer inside or outside of the restaurant. The web-based application that connects the customer directly to the ERB, with all of the same functionality as the computer at the host stand. Manager for iPad allows the customer to manage their ERB with limited functionality from their iPad either within the restaurant, or outside. Remote Manager is a web-based tool that allows a user to access their ERB with limited functionality from any device with access to the internet. OT Desktop FishBowl OpenTable Connect (web-based) Lightweight, web-based product Allows restaurants to accept online reservations and placement in the OpenTable network Limited functionality compared to the ERB OT Concierge Online restaurant reservation tool designed by and for hotel concierges. Special version of www.opentable.com Restaurant Center (www.otrestaurant.com - connect/ERB/GC) Website where restaurants control their profiles on the OpenTable network, as well as set up marketing campaigns (POP, specials, etc.) Restaurants ERB ERB companions OpenTable Connect OT Concierge Restaurant Center Rezbook GuestBridge Guest Center
  13. 13. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 13 Where restaurants can view their cover reports & billing statements Where they can access community and sign up for live training seminars Available for all ERB, OT Connect, and GuestCenter customers Not available for Rezbook customers Rezbook Acquired from UrbanSpoon in August 2013 Web-based reservation system for restaurants. Diner reservations are only accepted through UrbanSpoon GuestBridge Acquired in 2009. Used to be a competitor of the ERB, but did not focus as much on the online diner network. Still offered online reservations, but primarily from the restaurant’s website. 99% of the time uses restaurant owned hardware. Multiple add-on features such as a call center interface, integration with loyalty programs, caller ID, etc. All new Guestbridge customers are on the OpenTable network (searchable on OpenTable.com) Legacy customers have the option to be on the OpenTable network, but are not required. Frequently, the server is a remote computer or server, and the restaurant access is through a client license. Guest Center Brand new product that is still in beta Will eventually replace ERB and all companion products iPad App + web-based management component Diners’ Products OpenTable.com (Discover Restaurants / Book a Reservation) Also known as the OpenTable network Place where diners go to search for and discover restaurants and make restaurant reservations OpenTable Gifts Diners OpenTable. com OpenTable Gifts iOS App Android App Foodspotti ng Restaurant Reviews Payments
  14. 14. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 14 Gift cards available for purchase by diners Accepted only at certain OpenTable restaurants (see: https://gifts.opentable.com/) Gift cards where the Giftee chooses where they want to eat must be activated before use (activated thru website) Gift cards where the Gifter pre-selects the restaurant are already activated iOS App iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch application Allows diners to easily search, book, or cancel reservations through the OpenTable network Android App Allows diners to easily search, book, or cancel reservations through the OpenTable network Foodspotting iOS & Android application that allows users to find and share great dishes through photos (http://www.foodspotting.com/) Foodspotting photos are often integrated into the wider OpenTable network Restaurant Reviews Once a diner has completed their reservation (e.g. by eating at the restaurant), OpenTable will email them and invite them to write a review. Reviews that are not in line with our review guidelines will be removed. (Guidelines: http://www.opentable.com/info/opentable-user-reviews-guidelines.aspx) Payments New product, currently in a limited beta When enabled, this product will allow diners to pay their checks through the OpenTable app without having to wait for a server to process the bill Trivia / Fun facts 96% of unhappy customers don’t complain, however 91% of those will simply leave and never come back – 1st Financial Training services A dissatisfied customer will tell between 9-15 people about their experience. Around 13% of dissatisfied customers tell more than 20 people. – White House Office of Consumer Affairs Happy customers who get their issue resolved tell about 4-6 people about their experience. – White House Office of Consumer Affairs
  15. 15. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 15 55% of customers would pay extra to guarantee a better service – Defaqto research Price is not the main reason for customer churn, it is actually due to the overall poor quality of customer service – Accenture global customer satisfaction report 2008 94% of customers do not want to be transferred to another representative more than once – Mobius Poll 2002 And last but not the least It takes 12 positive experiences to make up for one unresolved negative experience – “Understanding Customers” by Ruby Newell-Legner Core Knowledge – Customer Care Standards Customer experience is the sum of all experiences that a particular customer will have with a company. Customer Care and Customer Service go a long way in retaining customers and word-of-mouth publicity is the fastest and most trusted form of publicity, so, we want to have positive publicity and that can be achieved by giving the customers the best of service they expect. Elements of OpenTable’s Customer Care Philosophy Customer Care Empathy Authenticity Personal Accountability Creativity Sense of Urgency Adaptability Responsibility Maturity Open Mindedness
  16. 16. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 16 Empathy - Empathic people are emotionally generous, someone who enthusiastically shares compassion, attention, and sympathies. Authenticity - Be true to who you are. Speak responsibly in your own voice, and bring a human element to each and every interaction you have with a customer. Be genuine from within and build customer confidence. Personal Accountability - Be responsible for your own successes and failures, and be willing to answer for the outcomes of your choices, actions and behaviors. Creativity - Think outside the box in order to go above and beyond for each customer. Templates are guidelines, and not every solution is the same cookie cutter answer. Work with your manager to find creative solutions to restaurant and diner issues. Sense of Urgency - See customer issues as an opportunity to repair the relationship and act in a swift, yet purposeful manner to solve the issue within a reasonable timeframe. This can get tricky, because urgency does not mean hasty. So, listen patiently to what the customer has to say, convince the customer that you can help him / her and work towards a successful resolution for the problem. Adaptability - Be flexible and understand the need for growth and improvement. Each new change is a new opportunity Responsibility - Recognize that efficient, high-quality, proactive support is the cornerstone of our daily responsibilities Maturity - Be able to respond to the environment in the appropriate manner. Open Mindedness - Respect each other’s differences, and work together to resolve conflicts rather than win them. Overall we want people on the team with a noble character. You must be honest, strong, and confident enough to do what is right for our customers in order to ensure an amazing customer experience journey. Core Knowledge – Dealing with Different Customers There are different types of customers that you may need to deal with -
  17. 17. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 17 Handling Assertive / Demanding customers Listen so that you will understand the problem or request. Match some of the customer’s assertiveness. Use closed questions to help control the conversation. Be friendly, but specific and direct in your statements. Quick, useful tips If your voice is soft, raise it slightly. Be direct and to the point in your statements. Keep the non-business conversation to a minimum. Handling Angry / Irate / Abusive Customers Listen closely so you will understand the problem. Relate by apologizing in a general way or in a broad sense. Propose an action plan and then do it! Stay calm and avoid getting involved in the customer’s emotion. Remain courteous! Remember your strategy: TACT! Handling Complainers Customer Types Asserti ve Irate Compla iners Unsure / Passive Distres sed Impatie ntLanguage barriers Repeat Upset Longwi nded Intimid ating Flirtati ous
  18. 18. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 18 Listen!! Let the caller vent. After the caller is finished complaining, state “I understand how frustrating this must be....” Also let them know how you appreciate their concerns. Advise the caller “WHAT I CAN DO” Be up-front with the caller...if you can offer a reason or explanation, do so. Come up with alternatives, if applicable, to the caller’s request. Handling Unsure / Passive Customers Give the customer time; do not push or rush the customer. Use a confident tone to build trust. You want the customer to have confidence in your ability to solve her/his problems. Use active listening so the customer will know you understand her/his inquiry, problem, need. Handling Distressed Customers Reassure caller Be positive Let them vent! Take your time….be patient! Let them know they can call back if they need to Use positive expressions, “That’s what we are here for” Offer your name and assistance in the future If other vendors were involved in the past, involve them again if appropriate Handling Impatient Customers Acknowledge there is a need for quick action. Use closed probes to quickly gather information to handle the inquiry / problem / need. Be clear and concise in your advising and closing statements. If you must call the customer back, be sure to give them a good reason in your closing statement. Handling Elderly / Foreign language barriers / Challenged customers Listen for key words Talk very slowly (BUT not necessarily loudly unless caller is hearing impaired) Eliminate all outside noise Concentrate on what is being said Ask to repeat as needed Paraphrase Ask is there is anything else Avoid technical language, be simple
  19. 19. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 19 Have caller repeat information back to you Make sure callers are aware of hearing impaired line, if appropriate Probe for understanding as you’re going along, i.e., “Is everything clear?” Offer to transfer call for them if a transfer is warranted or tell them what buttons to push Handling Repeat Callers Confirm that the caller is calling back regarding an outstanding issue. Ask probing questions to ensure we understand what they are asking. If applicable, check for previously documented calls. o if the response is documented, provide the answer o if not, ask the caller is s/he minds holding and check for prior commitments and current status from other teammates. Relay any changes / updates to the caller. If the call cannot be satisfactorily completed within this “repeat call”, summarize the call and give the caller a date and time you will call back with the information, or an update on the situation. If the information is not being provided in a timely manner by someone within the team, give feedback immediately. Contact the caller with resolution and confirm satisfaction with the results. Apologize for the delay and ask if there is anything else we can do for them. Handling Upset Callers Listen, let them cry for a short period. Take ownership…would it better if you call her / him back at a later time? Suggest they call back at a better time. Reassure the caller and be patient Handling Longwinded Callers Listen up front until you know what the problem or issue is. At the first opportunity, after understanding the issue, gain control of the call by using CLOSED QUESTIONS and PARAPHRASING!….Explain what you can do to help. Use space control, providing little space between your statements for the caller to interrupt. You can do this and remain courteous without rushing. Provide minimal response…do not invite unnecessary conversation. Show Empathy throughout the conversation, but remain confident and firm. At the same time, pull up any call / case / note tracking (if applicable) and refer back to prior conversations to show the caller that you aware of the problem. Handling Intimidating Callers Be confident and authoritative Use a sympathetic tone and speak slowly Take ownership
  20. 20. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 20 Convince the customer that it is in her/his best interest to let you help Remain pleasantly persistent Use courtesy words (please, thank you) Put yourself in your customer’s shoes, “If I were you, I would be upset too. But let’s see how I can help you.” Offer creative solutions. Ask your teammates for help. Try to get the caller to agree to the small points in order to get her/him to agree to the larger concept later on. Get to the bottom line - What is the real issue? Try to take a short break before dealing with your next customer. Handling Flirtatious Callers First of all; try not to embarrass the customer, even though he/she is out of line. Don’t become embarrassed, or the customer may be encouraged. Remain calm and get the conversation back on track by asking “on-track” questions. Acknowledge the remark without being “caught-in-a-trap.” Some suggestions are: o Go on in a matter-of-fact, friendly way. o Chuckle, and change the subject, carry on with what you were saying. Core Knowledge – Improving Customer Experience Treat others as you would like to be treated when you buy something. This is the key to success in handling customers. Treat each customer with courtesy and respect. Part of being a professional is treating all customers with courtesy and respect. The customers you will be helping are among our clients’ most valuable resources, and it is important to treat them as such. Treat other employees with courtesy and respect Recognize your cross-functional business partners for a positive experience. Be responsive to voicemail and email. Remember that it takes all of us working together to deliver world class service. Greet each customer with a smile, be friendly and project energy and enthusiasm. Customers are not always happy to be calling us. It is important to make their experience a pleasant one. Answering the phone with a smile on your face and being friendly helps you project energy and enthusiasm. The act of listening will often allow the not-so-happy people to vent their emotions and be ready to listen and learn.
  21. 21. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 21 Be the customers advocate and be supportive of the customer’s needs. As a care agent, your job is to help customers. You essentially work for them and they are your paycheck. It is important to be supportive of the customers’ needs and to look at things from their perspective. Maintain professionalism and composure. Customers can be difficult to deal with, especially when they are upset and have an issue that requires a call to our client. As a professional, you need to maintain composure and remain calm and courteous, even when customers do not. Take ownership and follow issues through the resolution process. Listen to the customer. Make the best decision for the customer & the company by asking yourself: Is it the right solution for the issue? Does it make sense? YOU took the phone call, YOU own the issue. Go above and beyond to resolve each customer’s issue the first time. Delight the customer! It is important that you do everything in your power to resolve their issue yourself, the first time they call. Be honest! Don’t commit to something you know we can’t do! Keep the customer informed. Properly set expectations When you make a commitment, keep it. Respect the customer, and be honest with your customer. Under promise and over deliver Be Positive People that are positive are like magnets… others flock to them. When faced with a tough situation, YOUR reaction is YOUR choice. Don’t be afraid of complaints. Core Knowledge – Presenting Negative Information Yes, the information may not always be positive. But the negative information that you need to deliver needs to be handled positively. At no point should the customer feel alienated or should feel that he is not being given a fair deal. Prepare: Gather all of the information and you need. Know exactly what you’re going to say and how you’re going to say it. Prepare Identify the positive Present the facts Encourage Follow Up
  22. 22. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 22 Identify the positive: Find something significant that we CAN do for the customer. This needs to be related to the issue. Present the facts: Now, you have their attention and they are in a receptive frame of mind. Pause just a second to let that feeling solidify, then lead directly into the next step that must be taken. Avoid using the word “but” ad in “but next time” since that can create the defensive atmosphere that you’re trying to avoid. Be direct and firm, but never angry and never demeaning. Encourage: Give a bright outlook. When you gave the negative information you inevitably cause some mental deflation in the person. Don not leave that in place; it has to be removed quickly , but correctly. Project a positive outcome of future efforts. Follow Up: Let the customer know what you have done for them and what is going to be done in the future. By reminding them again of what you have don’t, they are able to see that you aren’t just “passing the buck”. Quick, useful tips Know your subject Be genuine Don’t be condescending Avoid blame Take ownership The worst possible way to present bad news is to lie about it. Always show empathy for those whom give you bad news Avoid excuses Outline the positive results Focus on the effort rather than the result Core Knowledge – Handling customers when he / she has been wronged Listen!! Let the caller vent. After the caller is finished complaining, state “I understand how frustrating this must be….” Also let them know how you appreciate their concerns. Advise the caller with what you can do to help. Be up-front with the caller…if you can offer a reason or explanation, do so. Come up with alternatives, if applicable, to the caller’s request. If the customere has been a mistake from our side -
  23. 23. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 23 Apologize Acknowledge the mistake Take ownership for the resolution and give the caller your name Explain what you are going to do the make the correction Thank the caller for bringing the mistake to our attention Show empathy Use positive statements, i.e., “I have the details that I need to help you.” ALWAYS GIVE CONSTRUCTIVE FEEDBACK TO YOUR TEAMMATES who did not successfully provide accurate information or help the caller as promised. Nothing positive is ever accomplished when customers and the people trying to serve them cross swords over a problem. When things go wrong, or don’t come out quite the right way, you have to separate the person from the performance – and focus your energy on correcting what went wrong. Core Knowledge – Specific instances of addressing customer concerns When the customer wants to talk to your manager Read all prior case / call tracking notes to see if this call is related to prior issue / problem. Offer your assistance first…take ownership! My name is ______. I’d like to help you and if I am unable to help you, I will discuss this with _______. I will personally see that this matter is resolved. If applicable, conference others who may be able to assist in the call. Offer to have the caller speak with another representative. Let me have you speak with __________. Let me have you speak with a Senior Representative. If all other attempts fail, refer call to manager using program-appropriate guidelines. At no times should the customer feel neglected or should he feel that the manager is avoiding meeting or talking to him. Declining a customer’s request Paraphrase to be sure you understand the request. Reassure the caller you DO understand the request. Express a willingness to help…offer “can do” alternatives. Be firm that the alternatives that you have offered are the only ones to prevent doubt and a possible repeat call. Explain the reasons behind what can be done.
  24. 24. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 24 Apologize if appropriate and be sure to tell the customer what you CAN DO….. REMEMBER….can’t is not a word! Delivering Bad News Don’t place blame. Reemphasize wiliness to help. Let caller know you understand, empathize. Don’t defend processes if they don’t work. Take ownership. Review what you have done and what you can do further to help. Apologize. Accentuate the positives, if possible. Thank them for brining up the issue, you will note any concerns (per program guidelines). Let the customer know that you are trained to help them and that a supervisor won’t provide any different information. Bounce the situation off someone else to see if they can provide any insight as to how they might handle the situation differently. As a last resort, pass off the call to a teammate. Speak confidently and with authority. Ask for clarification if you are unsure of anything. Reference any documentation that they have immediately available to them. Possibly conference call others and get time commitments and resolution. Problems with Systems and Software Be up front with the caller – tell them you are experiencing computer difficulties. Try to avoid using negative words like PROBLEM. Ask more probing questions to determine if the system is really needed to answer the caller’s question. Don’t slam the system to the caller. If unable to answer the call, either offer to call back or ask the caller if they prefer to call us back. Be sure to capture the appropriate call-back information (name, reach number, account/social security number, reason for call). Keep a positive attitude. Apologize. Emphasize what you CAN do.
  25. 25. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 25 Use phrases like: I am not able to view your record. My system is moving slowly. I am not able to look at that file now. Unreasonable Demands from Callers Explain the process and explain why it would be difficult to meet their demands. Don’t be defensive. Offer options if possible. Probe to find out the real “reason” for the demand. Is there another solution you can provide that meets the demand? Ask the caller to support reason for the demand (put some responsibility back on the caller). Be confident giving the factual information related to the demand. If the customer is persistent, check with teammate or Specialist to see if the demand is unrealistic. “Pass off the call to a teammate” to see if someone else can explain in other words. When you don’t know the answer . . . Be confident and assure the caller that you will call back with an answer; i.e., “I want to help you with this situation and need time to research it, but will get back to you (give commitment – date/time), with an answer”. Be cautious about telling the caller you don’t know the answer but will get one; i.e., “I don’t know this answer and I want to be sure to give you the correct answer.” This could hurt your credibility. Let the caller know you are looking into other resources. If it is a quick answer, ask the caller to hold: “I am going to check my (references, senior Service Rep).” Don’t waste too much time trying to find the answer. Don’t leave the caller on hold for more too long (check company standards) Gather as much information as you can. Paraphrase information given by the caller to ensure understanding. Share any learned information with the rest of your team when you get the answer. It is okay to make “small talk” while you are looking up an answer…“dead air” is uncomfortable and annoying to a caller.
  26. 26. OpenTable Tier 1 Support Training Manual Page | 26 Tips for defusing stress Breathe - Deep breathing is one of the oldest stress-busting techniques, and one of the best. Take a deep breath through your nose. Hold it for 5 seconds, then let it out through your mouth. Do this 4 or 5 times. Smile - You make your mood, and your mood can stress or relax you. Smiling is contagious. And a smile can be heard in your voice. Laugh - Maintaining a sense of humor is your best defense against stress. Let it out - Anger and frustration are difficult to hide. Try setting aside a later time to vent about a particularly stressful customer. Unacknowledged tension will eat you up, but delaying your reaction to stress-causing events can be constructive. It puts you in control. Take a one minute vacation - Close your eyes and envision a favorite place. Focus on the details and totally remove yourself from the stressful situation for just a minute. Relax - Try some isometrics. Make a fist, and then relax it. Tighten your stomach muscles, and then relax them. Push your palms against each other, and then relax your arms. Do desk aerobics - Rotate your head forward and from side to side. Roll your shoulders forward and then lift them back up. Raise your legs a few inches off the floor, hold them, then let them down…repeat 5 times. Discussions / Role Play / Assignment Situation - Think about a situation in which you were not happy as a customer. Identify what you said, did and felt in that situation. Then, think about what the service person dealing with you did in the situation. Did they help diffuse your anger and satisfy your concerns or did their actions only escalate the situation? Get into pairs. Now, considering the above situation, one of you will be the customer and the other the customer service representative. Switch the above described type of customers and conduct conversations for two-three minutes. Record and analyze responses.

×