Connecting History, Agriculture  and the Future in the Classroom   California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom
<ul><li>California’s Native Tribes </li></ul>California had a thriving population long before the Spanish explorers and th...
<ul><li>The Legend of the Three Sisters </li></ul>A long time ago, there were three sisters who lived together in a field....
One day a stranger came to the field of the Three Sisters - a Mohawk boy. He talked to the birds and other animals - this ...
These crops played an important role in the agriculture and nutrition of most of the Native people of the Americas.  In a ...
<ul><li>Corn Activity: Growing Popcorn </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: </li></ul><ul><li>Plastic bag </li></ul><ul><li>Air-po...
<ul><li>Bean Activity: Bean Sorting </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed beans </li></ul><ul><li>Plastic b...
<ul><li>Squash Activity: Seed Roasting </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: </li></ul><ul><li>Pumpkin </li></ul><ul><li>Sunflower ...
<ul><li>Extension Activities </li></ul>What native California tribes likely grew “three sisters” gardens? Address the impo...
<ul><li>Gardens: An Important Teaching Tool </li></ul>Victory Gardens Victory Gardens produced up to 40 percent of all the...
<ul><li>Why use a garden as a teaching tool? </li></ul><ul><li>Significant gains in overall GPA in math and science. </li>...
<ul><li>California School Garden Network’s </li></ul><ul><li>Gardens For Learning </li></ul>” “ We have seen children who ...
<ul><li>Linking State Standards to Your School Garden </li></ul>This supplement is a helpful tool to guide educators throu...
 
 
<ul><li>Other Themes </li></ul>
<ul><li>Agricultural Fact and Activity Sheets </li></ul>Carrots were originally cultivated in Central Asia. What color wer...
<ul><li>Teacher Resource Guide </li></ul><ul><li>The  Teacher Resource Guide (TRG)  is a must-have tool for educators. </l...
<ul><li>What’s Growin’ On Student Newspaper </li></ul>This 16-page newspaper highlights the many agricultural products of ...
<ul><li>Lesson Plans and Comprehensive Units </li></ul>Lesson plans and units have been written, field-tested and reviewed...
California Foundation for  Agriculture in the Classroom Web site: www.LearnAboutAg.org Email: info@Learnaboutag.org
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Connecting History, Agriculture and the Future in the Classroom

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Make the connection between history agriculture and the future! The California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom provides teacher-tested, standards-based, educational materials for K-12 educators statewide to enhance all curriculum disciplines.

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Connecting History, Agriculture and the Future in the Classroom

  1. 1. Connecting History, Agriculture and the Future in the Classroom California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom
  2. 2. <ul><li>California’s Native Tribes </li></ul>California had a thriving population long before the Spanish explorers and the gold miners came to the State. Native peoples from different parts of California have used a wide range of agricultural techniques. Perhaps the best known technique is the interplanting of corn, beans, and squash together – a trio often referred to as the &quot;three sisters.&quot; Photo Credit: San Manuel Band of Mission Indians
  3. 3. <ul><li>The Legend of the Three Sisters </li></ul>A long time ago, there were three sisters who lived together in a field. These sisters were quite different from one another in their size and way of dressing. The little sister was so young that she could only crawl at first, and she was dressed in green. The second sister wore a bright yellow dress, and she had a way of running off by herself when the sun shone and the soft wind blew in her face. The third was the eldest sister, standing always very straight and tall above the other sisters and trying to protect them. She wore a pale green shawl, and she had long, yellow hair that tossed about her head in the breeze. There was one way the sisters were all alike, though. They loved each other dearly, and they always stayed together. This made them very strong.
  4. 4. One day a stranger came to the field of the Three Sisters - a Mohawk boy. He talked to the birds and other animals - this caught the attention of the three sisters. Late that summer, the youngest and smallest sister disappeared. Her sisters were sad. Again the Mohawk boy came to the field to gather reeds at the water's edge. The two sisters who were left watched his moccasin trail, and that night the second sister - the one in the yellow dress - disappeared as well. Now the Elder Sister was the only one left. She continued to stand tall in her field. When the Mohawk boy saw that she missed her sisters, he brought them all back together and they became stronger together, again. The Legend of the Three Sisters
  5. 5. These crops played an important role in the agriculture and nutrition of most of the Native people of the Americas. In a three sisters planting, the three partners benefit one another: Corn provides support for beans. Beans, like other legumes , have bacteria living on their roots that help them absorb nitrogen from the air and convert it to a form that plants can use. (Corn, which requires a lot of nitrogen to grow, benefits most.) The large, prickly squash leaves shade the soil, preventing weed growth, and deter animal pests. The three sisters also complement each other nutritionally. The Legend of the Three Sisters
  6. 6. <ul><li>Corn Activity: Growing Popcorn </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: </li></ul><ul><li>Plastic bag </li></ul><ul><li>Air-pop popcorn kernels </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton balls </li></ul><ul><li>Packing Tape </li></ul><ul><li>Each students receives four kernels of corn, one plastic bag and 4 cotton balls. </li></ul><ul><li>Plant one kernel in each of the cotton balls. </li></ul><ul><li>Tape the bags to the wall, around the classroom, in varying degrees of light. </li></ul><ul><li>Observations: </li></ul><ul><li>How does the plant grow? </li></ul><ul><li>How many days to germinate? </li></ul><ul><li>What grows first: roots or stems? </li></ul><ul><li>Which way to they grow? </li></ul><ul><li>Does growth related to light source? </li></ul>1. 2. 3.
  7. 7. <ul><li>Bean Activity: Bean Sorting </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed beans </li></ul><ul><li>Plastic bags </li></ul><ul><li>Construction paper </li></ul><ul><li>Students work in pairs or trios to sort beans based on any visual characteristic. Students take turns guessing what characteristics are being sorted. </li></ul><ul><li>Create Venn diagrams using beans. Can be based on visual or knowledge of bean. </li></ul><ul><li>A bean is a seed! Use the “Seed Sort” to identify each bean. </li></ul>1. 2. 3.
  8. 8. <ul><li>Squash Activity: Seed Roasting </li></ul><ul><li>Materials: </li></ul><ul><li>Pumpkin </li></ul><ul><li>Sunflower Oil </li></ul><ul><li>Salt </li></ul><ul><li>Oven </li></ul><ul><li>Remove seeds from the pulp of a pumpkin. Pat dry with a clean towel. </li></ul><ul><li>Add 1 tablespoon oil and ½ teaspoon salt per cup of seeds. Toss to coat evenly. </li></ul><ul><li>Spread seeds on baking sheet. Bake until golden, about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cool before eating. </li></ul>1. 2. 3.
  9. 9. <ul><li>Extension Activities </li></ul>What native California tribes likely grew “three sisters” gardens? Address the importance of story-telling in history. Students tell their family’s story or research another legend that was told verbally. Create a California map that visually represents California’s major tribes. Plant your own “three sisters” garden and enjoy the fruit of your labor. Celebrate California Native American Day, the fourth Friday of every September.
  10. 10. <ul><li>Gardens: An Important Teaching Tool </li></ul>Victory Gardens Victory Gardens produced up to 40 percent of all the fresh produce being consumed nationally during WWII. Cultural Studies Discover what people eat and produce in other countries Ancient Crops The main vegetables grown in ancient Egypt were onions, leeks, beans, lentils, garlic, radish, cabbage, cucumbers and lettuce. (Seed Savers Exchange, www.nativeseeds.org) Geography What is grown where? Why? Innovations in Agriculture What inventions have allowed farmers to be more efficient in plant, harvesting and irrigating?
  11. 11. <ul><li>Why use a garden as a teaching tool? </li></ul><ul><li>Significant gains in overall GPA in math and science. </li></ul><ul><li>Improved classroom management and reduced discipline problems. </li></ul><ul><li>Significant increase in children’s consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. </li></ul><ul><li>Improved agricultural and ecological literacy. </li></ul><ul><li>Greater concern and willingness </li></ul><ul><li>to care for living things. </li></ul><ul><li>Improved attitudes towards school </li></ul><ul><li>and improved interpersonal </li></ul><ul><li>relationships. </li></ul>Sundale Elementary School Tulare, California
  12. 12. <ul><li>California School Garden Network’s </li></ul><ul><li>Gardens For Learning </li></ul>” “ We have seen children who balk at eating vegetables eat them with great relish when they grow and nurture them themselves. Nonnie Korten, Founder, The Nutrition Network This comprehensive guidebook provides: Detailed step-by-step instructions for creating a school garden. Inspiring testimonials from teachers who grow and teach through garden-based education. Fundraising ideas for school garden projects. Training opportunities for teachers and volunteers.
  13. 13. <ul><li>Linking State Standards to Your School Garden </li></ul>This supplement is a helpful tool to guide educators through the limitless possibilities of school gardens. Created by educators, for educators, this resource aligns the activities identified on pages 20-28 of Gardens for Learning to the K-6 teaching standards mandated by the California State Board of Education. To receive a free copy of both books, visit www.csgn.org
  14. 16. <ul><li>Other Themes </li></ul>
  15. 17. <ul><li>Agricultural Fact and Activity Sheets </li></ul>Carrots were originally cultivated in Central Asia. What color were they originally? Did you know during WWII, British aviators were fed a specially developed carrot high in beta-carotene? Why? Q: Q: Agricultural Fact and Activity Sheets: Facts about production, history, economic value, nutritional value, and geographical location. Lesson Ideas Fantastic Facts Graphics Step-by-Step Lesson Plan
  16. 18. <ul><li>Teacher Resource Guide </li></ul><ul><li>The Teacher Resource Guide (TRG) is a must-have tool for educators. </li></ul><ul><li>CFAITC instructional materials </li></ul><ul><li>Free and low-cost resources from other educational organizations, commodity groups and companies </li></ul><ul><li>Fact and information about agriculture </li></ul><ul><li>Books related to food, forest, fiber and forest products </li></ul><ul><li>Field trip opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Educational Web sites </li></ul><ul><li>Grant opportunities </li></ul>
  17. 19. <ul><li>What’s Growin’ On Student Newspaper </li></ul>This 16-page newspaper highlights the many agricultural products of California. Aligned to the Content Standards for California Public Schools. Recent History-Social Science topics: Cultivation of grapes Egg Folklore FREE classroom sets available for educators.
  18. 20. <ul><li>Lesson Plans and Comprehensive Units </li></ul>Lesson plans and units have been written, field-tested and reviewed by educators. They meet Content Standards for California Public Schools in: History-Social Science Science Mathematics English-Language Arts Health Education Visual and Performing Arts
  19. 21. California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom Web site: www.LearnAboutAg.org Email: info@Learnaboutag.org

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