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Leardon Solutions "Prototyping Your Ideas"

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This presentation describes the reasons why you should prototype your ideas and covers the necessary steps to turn your product idea or concept into a prototype.

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Leardon Solutions "Prototyping Your Ideas"

  1. 1. TM<br />Prototyping Your Ideas<br />An overview of the first steps for commercializing your product idea <br />Joseph Donoghue<br />President <br />Leardon Solutions<br />United States | Ireland | Taiwan<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  2. 2. What is a Prototype?<br />TM<br />pro·to·type(American Heritage Dictionary)<br />NOUN: <br />1. An original type, form, or instance serving as a basis or standard for later stages. <br />2. An original, full-scale, and usually working model of a new product or new version of an existing product. <br />3. An early, typical example.<br />Original – The first or from the beginning of product development<br />Full-scale – Correctly sized with all the parts<br />Working – Demonstrates the function of your product<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  3. 3. Commercialization Starts<br />With Prototyping<br />TM<br />PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS<br />Enhances patient comfort by preventing the tourniquet from twisting on arm<br />Safe<br />FDA Class I Device<br />Low cost and producible in the millions<br />No bending or breaking during normal use<br />Works with latex and latex-free tourniquets<br />Allows for ambidextrous use<br />One time use<br />Use with one hand to retighten tourniquet to reestablish pressure<br />Design Prototype<br />Proof-of-Concept Prototype<br />Production Prototype<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  4. 4. Prototype Overview<br />TM<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  5. 5. Why Create a Prototype<br />TM<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  6. 6. What Design Capabilities<br />Are Required<br />TM<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  7. 7. What Fabrication <br />Capabilities Are Required<br />TM<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  8. 8. Beer Tap Lock<br />Booklet Folding Mechanism<br />Proof-of-Concept <br />Prototypes<br />TM<br />Essential Tremors Eating Assistance<br />Winterizing Device<br />Ink-jet printer paper feed<br />Tape Dispensers<br />Bicycle Shifting Plate<br />Clinical Diagnostic Case<br />Medical Tourniquet<br />Cyclemower<br />Intubation tube translation<br />Biological Analysis Chip Holder<br />High-speed envelope printer<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  9. 9. Design Prototypes<br />TM<br />TM<br />Essential Tremor Eating Assistance<br />Clinical Diagnostic Case<br />Active Wear Exercise Belt<br />Clinical Diagnostic Access Door<br />Medical Diagnostic<br />Automotive Finance Device<br />Medical Intubation Device<br />Bicycle Seat Clamps<br />Machined Body Panel<br />Cyclemower<br />Pet Food Bowl<br />Eye/Ear Protection<br />Equine Muscle Warmer<br />LED Illuminated Sign<br />
  10. 10. Custom Bicycle Head-Tube Badges<br />Production Prototypes<br />Snowboard Binding<br />Pet Food Bowl<br />Microbrewery Beer Tap<br />Medical Tourniquet<br />Acrylic Golf Putter<br />Grease Fitting<br />Custom Mechanical Components<br />Low-Level Laser Therapy Device<br />Inkjet Printer<br />
  11. 11. How to Find a <br />CompetentSupplier<br />TM<br />Contrary to popular belief, there is a manufacturing base in the United States<br />Professors in the local Engineering and Business Schools are well connected to industry professionals<br />Patent Attorneys have connections with prototype and manufacturing companies<br />A local Small Business Development Center (SBDC) will be extremely helpful to get started<br />Get referrals from friends/family - Try not to blindly open the phone book or search on the internet for suppliers <br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  12. 12. How to Find a <br />CompetentSupplier<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Outsourcing and Offshoring
  13. 13. Outsourcing: subcontracting a process to a third-party company
  14. 14. Offshoring: relocation of a business process from one country to another
  15. 15. Things to consider when offshoring
  16. 16. Don’t underestimate the difficulty in offshoring a prototype
  17. 17. Inventors typically don’t have the leverage or economics of scale to approach off-shore manufacturers and get world-class pricing
  18. 18. A thorough understanding of the culture and how to effectively communicate with them are keys for successful offshoring
  19. 19. Relationships are key to the successful of the offshoring project
  20. 20. Don’t blindly search alibaba.com and globalsources.com for vendors</li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  21. 21. How to Avoid a <br />Supplier Disaster<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Maintain an extremely close relationship with your supplier
  22. 22. A supplier relationship is about teamwork: expect co-accountability for the success of your product and don’t “point fingers”
  23. 23. Some suppliers will tell you that they can do anything – perform your due diligence
  24. 24. Resolve all product issues prior to starting the prototype or production
  25. 25. Be sure to have the product cost quotations in place prior to starting</li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  26. 26. How to Make a Prototype<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Stereolithography (SLA)
  27. 27. A laser is used to cure liquid material and generate a part
  28. 28. Parts are great for verifying form and fit but not usually function
  29. 29. Takes about 3 days from release
  30. 30. Cost ranges from $300 to $1000 for medium parts</li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  31. 31. How to Make a Prototype<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Machining
  32. 32. It is possible to machine most plastics and metals
  33. 33. Turnaround times are around 1-3 weeks
  34. 34. Produces parts that can be used to test form, fit, and function
  35. 35. Part cost ranges from $150 for small parts and $6000 for large parts </li></ul>Final Prototype Assembly<br />Machined Parts Before Gluing<br />www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  36. 36. How to Make a Prototype<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Silicone Molding
  37. 37. Take a machined plastic part and create a silicone mold for producing 15 parts
  38. 38. Costs more than a tooled part but lead-time is much faster
  39. 39. A set of 15 small parts will cost around $1500-$2500</li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  40. 40. How to Make a Prototype<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Other Rapid Prototyping Methods:
  41. 41. FDM: Fused Deposition Modeling
  42. 42. Thin bead of molten ABS is extruded through a computer controlled nozzle and deposited layer by layer.
  43. 43. Small to medium parts with good strength characteristics
  44. 44. Have a ribbed appearance due to layering
  45. 45. SLS: Selected laser sintering
  46. 46. uses a computer controlled laser to sinter (melt) a thermoplastic powder, layer by layer, to create a three dimensional part
  47. 47. Similar to SLA
  48. 48. Wide range of materials including nylon, metals, and elastomers
  49. 49. LOM: Laminated object manufacturing
  50. 50. Layers of glue-backed paper form the model
  51. 51. Low cost and readily available material
  52. 52. Good for large parts
  53. 53. Needs to be sealed to avoid moisture absorption </li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  54. 54. How to Make a Prototype<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Quick-turn Printed Circuit boards (PCB)
  55. 55. Normal PCBs take around 3-4 weeks to produce.
  56. 56. This process take 3 days and costs around 10 times more than an normally produced PCB.
  57. 57. Electronic Components
  58. 58. Use Digi-Key on-line catalog for small quantities of electrical component</li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />
  59. 59. How to Make a Prototype<br />TM<br /><ul><li>Quick-turn Printed Circuit boards (PCB)
  60. 60. Normal PCBs take around 3-4 weeks to produce.
  61. 61. Quick turn process take 3 days and costs around 10 times more than an normally produced PCB.
  62. 62. Electronic Components
  63. 63. Use Digi-Key on-line catalog for small quantities of electrical component</li></ul>www.leardon.com<br />© 2011 Leardon Solutions<br />

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