SCS is about
effectively organizing
citizens & institutions to
shape civic practices for
local & global well-being
11DRAFT...
2
Form a community of practice on
systematic civic stewardship (SCS)¹
• to increase civic stewardship capabilities
in comm...
Cities & Communities: Cities are principal agents for change at local and global
levels, and communities are strategic con...
44
Cities are intricately
interwoven webs of
communities, and our
global civilization is
bound together by a
vital network...
5
In recent years, we have increased considerably our understanding, skills, and
intentional efforts for cultivating commu...
Since the 1970’s, despite our best efforts via policy, technology and free-market
forces, societal problems persist and un...
• Complexity of problems requires
combined social and technical solutions
provided jointly by diverse players with
complem...
8
We can achieve order-of-magnitude advances by better organizing¹
From hierarchy
to community
• Isolated solutions, often...
9
SCS shifts from an primary reliance on
bureaucratic governance, with civil society
in a complementary role…
…to a leader...
Meta-Community
•Civic Shift participants build capacity
and civic infrastructure (skills, methods,
measures, etc.) to enga...
Communities of place and practice provide a civic stewardship infrastructure that fosters
both participation and expertise...
Neighborhood residents take ownership for local outcomes¹
NeighborhoodsofBoston
x = national average
Neighborhood opportun...
Frame Challenge
•What is the problemor opportunity?
•What purpose are we striving to achieve?
•How is it seen differentlyb...
14
Teams help cultivate the neighborhood as a constellation of communities that share a
common purpose for improving colle...
15
Healthcare community of practice²
members from 4 neighborhoods share
experiences and ideas to improve cancer
screening ...
16
Informal interactions support
and are spurred by structured
activities
Workshops and Coaching
on topical issues, best
p...
17
Institutional focus
•Multi-sector, institutional
coalitions target issues and
combine efforts for a shared goal
•Withou...
¹Parag Khanna, Director Global Governance Initiative,Foreign Policy,2010
•More than half the
world now lives in
cities; 70...
Scale
Influence
People
Infrastructure
Ideas
Place
Virtual
Blended
Physical
Communities
Institutions Critical Mass
Proximit...
Neighborhood Stewardship Teams Civic Communities of Practice Inter-City Networks
•How many civic communities of practice
a...
•Critical mass (30%+) of Boston-area
neighborhoods and small towns have
active stewardship teams making visible
progress o...
22
Slides 23-27 outline preliminary draft of a Civic Shift action-learning plan
23
Participative, recursive processes for designing, launching, and scaling action-learning labs
Hold
Design Charettes³
La...
24
The charette process begins by
engaging a community-based
team or coalition, which takes
the lead in a public, particip...
• Stewardship teams from 3+ neighborhoods
with a shared, measurable goal (e.g.,health)
collaborate as a community of pract...
An SCS meta-communitybuilds skills, relationships,systems & resources for the Civic Shift initiative
CIVIC ACTIVISTS
engag...
27
Engage community leaders
and other civic participants,
including specialists, researchers,
institution leaders, designe...
28
Slides 29-38 provide additional detail on components of the SCS model
Monetization to
ensure sustained funding
for critical coordination and
development functions
Measures of civic
outcomes—he...
30
Description: San Diego’s
Diamond district includes
10 neighborhoods and
88,000 people, primarily
low income. The Villag...
31
Civic Communities of Practice
• Assess landscape of practices and results across localities on a
targeted issue
• Disco...
²Illustrativeestimates cited here are for cities with populations of approximately 100,000. (There are about 300 cities ov...
INSTITUTIONAL INVESTMENTS
•Public utility saves $1 million in penalties by contracting with local “green neighborhoods” th...
34
Community identity and social trust foster the success of local organizations—including
businesses, schools, civic grou...
SCS promotes the practice of universal principles for shared purposes
Learning about the issues and
innovative solutions…e...
IF we can create civic system conditions that:
1. Define Civic Value (i.e., outcomes related to health, education, safety,...
New capacity for
collaborative learning
and action
Technology²
Millennial Mindset
Social-Psychology
Participative
democrac...
“By making
communities of our
cities we take a giant
stride toward world
community, and in the
end lasting peace will
come...
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Expanded Presentation | Civic Shift: Action-Learning Lab for Systematic Civic Stewardship (SCS)

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This is expanded content related to the 2013 Webinar: Systematic Civic Stewardship: An Organizing Model for Leading Change in the Social Sector | Monday, June 3, 2013

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Expanded Presentation | Civic Shift: Action-Learning Lab for Systematic Civic Stewardship (SCS)

  1. 1. SCS is about effectively organizing citizens & institutions to shape civic practices for local & global well-being 11DRAFT 05/31/2013© 2012 William M. Snyder / wsnyder@socialcapital.com / worlddesign.org world design, world design, world design Civic Shift/Boston will launch action-learning labs that apply the SCS approach to get results, build civic capacity & scale the work
  2. 2. 2 Form a community of practice on systematic civic stewardship (SCS)¹ • to increase civic stewardship capabilities in communities city-wide for breakthrough results on an array of civic outcomes (health, education, economy, etc.) • while building a discipline and civic commitment for a broader social movement. Civic initiatives are crucial to societal well-being • but most lack essential stewardship capabilities, and research shows disappointing levels of sustained socio-economic gains. There is a persistent gap between institutional & community efforts • Multi-stakeholder coalitions & leading institutions often take a hierarchical approach to community change. • Community groups generally work in isolation from each other and lack sufficient institutional partnerships. Civic Shift: Organize civil society more systematically • Shapinghousehold and community norms can significantly improve outcomes in education, health, safety, jobs, etc. • Organizing more systematically at community and city-wide levels enables residents and other stakeholders to shift norms and improve policies & programs. ¹The SCS communityisalsoknownas a “meta-community”todistinguishit fromtopic-specificcommunitiesofpractice (on health, education, etc.). These terms and others are provisional and will likely evolve as the work progresses. Contents • Overview….…….3-21 • Action Plan…...22-27 • Components of the SCS model……..29-38 Link to low-ink version Link to in brief version • Neighborhood stewardship teams address targeted issues and achieve measurable outcomes; led by residents & other local stakeholders. • City-wide communities of practice foster learning, innovation, and collective action; among participants and institutions across localities. • Meta-community supports development of SCS capabilities, including participative methods, civic measures, social media, and sustainable funding; for all participants, city-wide & beyond. Purpose Case for change Organizing approach
  3. 3. Cities & Communities: Cities are principal agents for change at local and global levels, and communities are strategic contexts for building civic capacity and achieving breakthrough results. Participation: We need a more participatory democracy in which citizens take direct action to improve local civic outcomes, versus relying predominantly on policies and programs via government and other institutions.¹ Organizing Opportunity: We have a ripe opportunity now to build civic capacity, given recent innovations in participatory methods, civic data, social media, monetization instruments, and structures that foster collective action and distributed learning. Action-Learning: We can best build our capacity for systematic civic stewardship by learning from experience; starting with design charettes and action-learning labs in pilot communities, and expanding from there. Transformation: Transformative social change requires transformation among participants: learning that transcends conventional views, collaborating with diverse others, and aligning to the greater good, even when this entails personal change. 3 ¹The term ”citizens“refers here to all residents and stakeholder organizationswho influence and are affectedby shared civic conditions , including those related to health, education, housing, economy, safety, infrastructure,culture, recreation, the environment, human rights, others.
  4. 4. 44 Cities are intricately interwoven webs of communities, and our global civilization is bound together by a vital network of cities. By practicing more systematic civic stewardship in communities at every level, we can foster transformative shifts for well-being worldwide. “Cities rather than states are becoming the islands of governance on which the future world order will be built.”¹ “You can't understand modern life without understanding cities. They are the force behind everything interesting. They are where everything new is coming from.”² ¹Parag Khanna, Director Global Governance Initiative,Foreign Policy,2010 ²John Lehrer, Imagine:How CreativityWorks, 2012
  5. 5. 5 In recent years, we have increased considerably our understanding, skills, and intentional efforts for cultivating communities in all areas of our lives "Whatever happens to the individual happens to the whole group, and whatever happens to the whole group happens to the individual. The individual can only say: 'I am, because we are and since we are, therefore I am.‘¹ ¹John S. Mbiti (AfricanReligionsand Philosophy,1990), regarding the principle of Ubuntu The power of systematic civic stewardship derives ultimatelyfrom community: • Communities are the most influential forces for well-being in personal, professional, and public contexts. • We can systematically cultivatevital communities, and constellations of communities. • Communities of place (e.g., neighborhoods and cities) can be framed as communities of purpose that foster both personal and civic well-being.² ²The term “community of purpose” has been used in many contexts (including organizational); here it refers to communities whose members organize systematically for collective well-being.
  6. 6. Since the 1970’s, despite our best efforts via policy, technology and free-market forces, societal problems persist and unprecedented ones are emerging Culture An exception that proves the rule? Communities of artists and art lovers have always been strong Health U.S. health costs now ~15% of GDP and rising Transportation Commuting time up 10% from 1980-2010 Energy Cost of carbon-based energy about $2 trillion/year in 2100 in U.S. alone for effects related to global warming Public Safety Crime rate unchanged since 1970 (incarceration rate is 400% higher); new threats of terrorism and “bio-errors” Infrastructure U.S. infrastructure degraded from “C” grade in 1988 to “D” grade in 2009 Education ~20% drop-out rate in U.S. since 1970’s Housing 20% in U.S. lack safe, affordable housing Economy Poverty in U.S. stuck at 12+% since the 1970’s (now 15%); despite trillions spent on means-tested programs Environment Loss of biodiversity through mass extinctions (40% of 40,000 species under Red List watch) Recreation U.S. kids spend average of 7.5 hours watching screens (TV, computers, phones) Civic Engagement Reduced levels of “social capital” and public trust; widespread ideology-driven acrimony Social Equity Persistent racial and ethnic disparities in health, income, and education outcomes 6
  7. 7. • Complexity of problems requires combined social and technical solutions provided jointly by diverse players with complementary capabilities • Subjectivity of cultural norms and practices requires interpersonal and group engagement to shape attitudes and behaviors that drive results • Glocality requires collaboration by civic groups across localities to address interdependencies, and to influence broader systems, policies, and institutional actions Communities with “collective efficacy” can respond to forces² • Collaborative action-learning among residents & organizations • Local commitment to shape socio-behavioral norms (e.g., household energy practices) as well as broader policies and programs for greater collective well-being³ • Inter-local learning & collaboration by civic groups with shared interests ²R.J. Sampson documents the power of “collective efficacy”—acombination of social trust and a shared sense of capacity to address local problems—in Great American City: Chicagoand the EnduringNeighborhood Effect,2012. See also A. Fung on advantages of community-based“deliberative democracy” (2006) ⁴WhatDoes ObamaReally Believe In?, New York Times, August 15, 2012, p. 9 Communities are fundamental contexts for solving persistent problems¹ Societal forces demand commensurate responses ¹Community contexts include ones defined by place, practice, interest,kinship-friendshipties, workplace, ethnicity, race, and other affiliations.Factors that make place-basedcommunities particularlyinfluential include: shared civic identity; proximity; measurability of outcomes; visibility of interventions & effects; and nexus for other types of communities. ³Seep.12forexamplesofcommunity-level opportunitiesto improve civic outcomes 7
  8. 8. 8 We can achieve order-of-magnitude advances by better organizing¹ From hierarchy to community • Isolated solutions, often at odds • Defined and applied top-down, predominantly at state and federal levels • Minimal citizen engagement • Multi-level collaboration and engagement within and across neighborhoods and cities • Collective action-learning by residents and organizations that shift practices as well as policies ¹Metcalf’s Law states that the value of a networkfor participantsincreases exponentially with the number of connectionsamong them. ²A phrase first used by feminists organizing in the early 1970’s (Source),and later by social movement theoristssuch as Marshall Ganz. James Lawson,mentor to Martin Luther King Jr., argues that successfulsocial movements use a “systematic”approach. Bureaucratic Governance Systematic Civic Stewardship The civic sector today labors under a “tyranny of structurelessness”²
  9. 9. 9 SCS shifts from an primary reliance on bureaucratic governance, with civil society in a complementary role… …to a leadership role for outcome-focused, diverse civic groups, working within and across neighborhoods and cities -- Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840, Democracy in America -- Robert Putnam, 1996, Bowling Alone “Americans of all ages, all stations in life, and all types of disposition are forever forming associations. . . [This is] the most democratic country in the world.” “High on America’s agenda should be the question of how to reverse [recent] adverse trends in social connectedness, thus restoring civic engagement and civic trust.”
  10. 10. Meta-Community •Civic Shift participants build capacity and civic infrastructure (skills, methods, measures, etc.) to engage a growing number of neighborhoods & stakeholders for greater societal well-being, in Boston and beyond Health Stewardship Team Neighborhood Stewardship Team •Residents and other stakeholders come together to find ways to shift community & workplace practices (e.g., self-care norms, campaigns, health-care plans, etc.) to increase screening and early treatment rates City-wide Community of Practice •Members of multiple stewardship teams and other key players (including communities, institutions, and stakeholder coalitions) share ideas, innovate, and collaborate on city-wide projects and policy efforts 10 Illustrative² ¹Forexample,screeningratesforhighlypreventablecervicalandcoloncancersare~65%&20%(respectively)inlow-incomeneighborhoods,versus 85%and40%in thegeneralpopulation.Overall,screeningratesarefarbelowoptimal:U.S.2020goalsforcervicalandcolectoralare93%and70%. SCS Solution: Civic stewardship participants lead shifts in practices, programs, and policies; beginning in several neighborhoods and expanding from there Civic Problem: Cancer screening and earlytreatmentrates are far below targets,incurring significant human and financial costs, especially in low-income neighborhoods¹ Results: • Screening and early-treatment rates in participating neighborhoods targeted to improve by 10% in 2 years • Considerable reduction in human and financial costs • New civic capacity for addressing other health issues ²This case illustration draws on an NCI-ledeffort in 4 cities across 3 states
  11. 11. Communities of place and practice provide a civic stewardship infrastructure that fosters both participation and expertise; within and across localities 11 Civic communities of practice are groups of citizens from multiple neighborhoods, plus institutional players, who build capability in a targeted civic domain (e.g., health): •Promote learning and innovation about civic practices •Organize for collective action and advocacy •Operate within and across cities This interwoven, multi-level structure supports an enlightened, inclusive, and truly participatory democracy Neighborhoods (and cities) are strategic civic entities: •Local ownership and initiative •Able to shape civic practices for results •Measurable accountability Capability Accountability Communities of Practice Neighborhoods
  12. 12. Neighborhood residents take ownership for local outcomes¹ NeighborhoodsofBoston x = national average Neighborhood opportunities forimprovingresults² •Energy:Shift household & business practices; use energy-saving appliances &building materials, andsustainable energy devices •Public Safety: Build social cohesion (e.g., by increasing the number of residents who know their neighbors) •Infrastructure: Changes in local design & practices to enhance functions: water, roads, sewage, transport & Internet •Environment: Conservation, recycling, planting trees, and establishing community parks •Economy: Promote community networks & localbusinesses to help residents find jobs, build skills & create & fund start-ups •Education: Encourage and enhance parental involvement to help kids learn at home and school •Housing: Inform resident decisions about size, design, and density, buy/rent and financing options •Transportation: Increase use of carpooling, public transit, bikes, and walking •Recreation: Groups for dance and sports that encourage participation & enjoyment; turn vacant lots into playing fields •Culture: Organize events to spotlight local talent and encourage participation in culture-making for well-being •Health: Increase cancer screening rates for early detection and treatment; walking groups; community gardens Neighborhood outcomes (illustrative) •75% H.S. grad. rate •1.5x Cancer rate •20% Unemployed •2x Mortgage defaults •.8x MW/household •2x Public transit use •2x Crime; 3x Incarceration •40% Voter registration ²A blog post (4/25/2012) at E-Democracy.org lists ways technology can enhance neighborhood-levelinitiatives. Greater access to “big data” on civic outcomes at the neighborhood level creates new opportunities for local goal-setting and innovation. 12 ¹Neighborhood-basedSCS“coreteams”(anytypeoflocalcoordinatingentity)providelocalstrategic&coordinating functionstohelpresidents&stakeholdersreviewoutcomes,setpriorities,organizeprojects&stewardshipteams,etc.
  13. 13. Frame Challenge •What is the problemor opportunity? •What purpose are we striving to achieve? •How is it seen differentlyby diverse players? Design Solution •What are ways to solve the problem? •What are best practices; proven tools and methods? •Who to engage? Adaptive Action •What adjustments are needed? •How are conditionschanging? •What are critical skills, methods, resources? Evaluate & Diffuse Did we achieve our goal? •Lessons learned? •Implications for sustainingand disseminating? Interdependent, dynamic processes Residents work with health-careexperts and determine that screening & early treatment for breast, cervical & colon cancers is a ripe area for improving neighborhood health outcomes. Residents increase screening rates and treatment by 20%; will heal thousands and save millions in next decades; still, room to improve…. They gather data on results, analyze key factors (e.g., self-care norms); design outreach initiative; argue for more clinic access. Engage doctors’ offices, schools, and businesses (such as beauty salons, pharmacies, and fitness centers) to promote awareness; city agency and health clinics change policies that increase access to screening and treatment services. ¹The methods mentioned here are merely representativeof a burgeoning array. A slide presentation on best practices for community-organizing mentions hundreds of them. For example, there are over 150 on dialogue and deliberationalone (see NCDD list). 13 Teams lead rigorously participative problem-solving & innovation efforts; they shift culture through direct engagement, not only via new programs, policies & built environments Illustrative³ ³Healthcare reference case in Medical Care, 2008: pp. S74-S83. •21st Century Town Meetings •Study Circles •Public workshops •City-design charettes (case) •Heart and Soul Comm. Planning •Community PlanIt •Future Search •Open Space •Big Data (e.g., San Francisco) ¹ •New Urban Mechanics •E-Democracy.org •Neighbors for Neighbors •Nextdoor •ChangebyUs •City 2.0 •MIT Civic Media lab 2 ²More tools are listed on p. 37.
  14. 14. 14 Teams help cultivate the neighborhood as a constellation of communities that share a common purpose for improving collective wellbeing Place identity is strengthened by various types of community affiliations (friendship, hobby, kids, faith, vocation, ethnicity, etc.). Social capital increases via community affiliations, but this does not necessarily improve civic outcomes (health, safety, etc.). Stewardship teams leverage local social capital to increase a community’s collective efficacy for achieving neighborhood goals.¹ ¹Social capital refers to the density of social ties and related levels of trust, reciprocity,and shared values. Collective efficacyis defined as “social cohesion combined with shared expectationsfor social control” (Sampson, 2012: 27) and thus more explicitly refers to a community’s ability to achieve tangible civic outcomes. There is clearly overlap in the two concepts,and some definitions of social capital emphasize its role in “facilitatingco-ordinatedactions” for improving results (Putnamet al., 1993). Neighborhood as a Community of Purpose Stewardship teams can help various types of communities contribute to neighborhood wellbeing • Local gardeners and “foodies” organize a community vegetable garden. • Social media mavens develop a marketing application to help neighborhood businesses respond to local needs. • Parents organize a “play and learn” group for young kids. • Faith-based groups join efforts to promote sustainable energy practices. Community Wellbeing Key Various community types (friends,faith, vocation, etc.) Teams or coalitions focused on improving a civic outcome (health, education,safety, etc.) Health Energy Education Safety Housing Economy
  15. 15. 15 Healthcare community of practice² members from 4 neighborhoods share experiences and ideas to improve cancer screening rates. They compare current outcomes and interventions in their respective neighborhood populations. Members present both problems and solutions, draw on external expertise, and help each other apply a number of new approaches that show quick results in targeted areas. The healthcare community engages institutions as well as residents, across public, private, and non-profit sectors. Community members work on a collective effort that engages major hospitals, large employers, health management organizations, the Cancer Society, health clinics, as well as city and state agencies to shift policies and practices related to treatment and access for residents city-wide. In 3 years, more than 20 neighborhoods are involved and the community is progressing well towards its goal to increase screening rates city-wide by 20% in 5 years, thus substantially reducing human and economic costs of cancer. The community has begun working with similar initiatives in 2 other cities; this inter-city community includes national health organizations, non-profits & foundations, as well as the National Cancer Institute. ²This illustrative mini-case draws on a government-sponsored effort, with teams based in 4 different cities, describedin MedicalCare, 2008: pp. S74-S83. ¹These results (and activities & participants) are illustrative,not actual (see footnote #2). U.S. 2020 goal for and colectoral is 70%; average in 2010 was 40% . ILLUSTRATIVE
  16. 16. 16 Informal interactions support and are spurred by structured activities Workshops and Coaching on topical issues, best practices, and implementation Collective action for policy development & advocacy; public awareness Teleconferences bi-weekly on hot topics, case clinics, project updates Face-to-face gatherings Teleconferences Webinars Collective action Projects Experiments Visits Immersions Workshops Simulations Coaching Informal interactions Online resource space case studies, references, Q&A, blog, directory, etc. Projects for inter-local tools such as social media apps & city-wide design efforts Face-to-face gatherings to review Visits to see innovative methods in action, share skills, build relationships Online resource space for tools, Note: For more on community-of-practiceactivities and how they are applied, see Communitiesof Practice,Snyder & Briggs, 2003, pp. 13-16 An ecology of activities—formal and informal, face-to-face and virtual, at various frequencies— builds capabilities and relationships projects, demonstrate methods, report results, devise strategies & build relationships
  17. 17. 17 Institutional focus •Multi-sector, institutional coalitions target issues and combine efforts for a shared goal •Without a crisis, the impetus for collaboration is often too weak to gain & sustain active participation •Deep change requires grassroots groups that can shift cultural norms via community influence •Most conventional institutional efforts fail to achieve objectives¹ ²While many new neighborhood efforts—acrosssocio-economicprofiles--are gaining momentum (cf. Market Creek), research indicatesthat initiatives have historically fallen far short of aspirations.A review of two decades’ work concluded that “there is still no empirical evidence demonstrating that increases in community capacity lead to improved outcomes at the individual, family, or community level” (Kubischet al., Voicesfrom the Field III, The Aspen InstituteRoundtableon Community Change, 2010: vii). ¹Recent initiatives that emphasize shared goals and rigorous measures have shown promising results (cf. “Collective Impact”),but daunting challenges— conflictingstrategies,competition for funding, and scarce staff for coordinating partnership activities—areendemic. Lasker et al. conclude that “community coalitions “ (including local multi-stakeholderalliances) are “generallyfound by careful studies to have limited or no effects”(Why It Is So Difficultto Form EffectiveCommunityCoalitions,City & Community, 2005: 269). Neighborhood focus •“Comprehensive community initiatives” focus in specific neighborhoods, particularly distressed ones •It is difficult to maintain sufficient resources for leadership, training, funding, and influence required to build local capacity for sustained success •Even successful initiatives often fail to scale due to idiosyncrasy and isolation •20 years of work shows little long-term impact on socio-economic results² Integrative structures for action- learning: Civic Stewardship Communities of Practice •Inter-level: Core participants include both neighborhood stakeholders and institutions across all sectors (public, profit, & non-profit) •Inter-local: Neighborhood teams focused on targeted civic outcomes (health, education, etc.) connect across localities for learning, innovation, and collective action & influence We know collaboration is essential for achieving breakthrough results, but doing it via institutions or neighborhoods alone is problematic. Grassroots grow up in a stewardship system that helps them excel at home and spread the seeds of success Grasstops get rooted via communities of practice that yield local ideas, skills, commitments, and influence
  18. 18. ¹Parag Khanna, Director Global Governance Initiative,Foreign Policy,2010 •More than half the world now lives in cities; 70% by 2050 •Top 100 U.S. cities account for 75% of its GDP; top 100 cities in the world generate nearly 40% of global GDP •70% of global carbon emissions are produced by cities with over 50,000 people •Cultural product of the world is created primarily by artists, thought-leaders, and entrepreneurs who thrive in cities …get cities right, and you get the world right. “The age of nations is over: The new urban age has begun.” 18 “Cities are the world's experimentallaboratories and thus a metaphor for an uncertain age. They are both thecancerand the foundation of our networked world, both virus and antibody. From climate change to poverty and inequality, cities are the problem— and the solution.”¹
  19. 19. Scale Influence People Infrastructure Ideas Place Virtual Blended Physical Communities Institutions Critical Mass Proximity All sectors Faith Culture Practice & Interest Local nexus Inter-city mesh promotes global dissemination of ideas and innovations and builds collective capacity for change worldwide¹ National and international entities play support roles as cities take the lead to ensure policies, methods, and resources are applied effectively at the local level Cities foster intensive interactions among people and institutions with diverse perspectives, associations, and capabilities. This “creative abrasion” generates new ideas, relationships, and enterprises; and positions urban citizens to connect with peers locally& globally. Global node City with stewardship communities Nation National or transnational government or NGO City Mesh Legend Friends & Family Functions 19 Resources ¹Benjamin Barber, in “If Mayors Ruled the World” (2013), argues that inter-city networks—suchas the C40 on climate change and Cities for Mobility on transportation—arebetter positioned than internationalinstitutionsto disseminatepractical methods and policies that can solve problems both locally and globally; both because cities are better at putting ideas into action, and because collectively they have a predominant influence on global outcomes.
  20. 20. Neighborhood Stewardship Teams Civic Communities of Practice Inter-City Networks •How many civic communities of practice at the city-wide level, on what topics? •What types of institutions and constituencies are involved? •How quickly disseminating successes? •In which neighborhoods do we have active teams? On what topics? •What levels of skills and diversity? •What types of solutions? How effective? What results? •How many cities are involved, on what topics? •How involving major institutions? •What level of inter-city learning and dissemination? SCS system-development questions 20 •Identify, launch & support SCS efforts •Organize peer-to-peer learning activities •Coach leaders, teams & communities •Engage institutions •Support measurement and monetization •Facilitate collaboration across topics (e.g., health and education) •Provide integrated social technologies •Coordinate research and development •Promote vision for a local-global social movement Meta-community functions Cities Worldwide Neighborhood Stewardship teams focused on a civic issue, such as health, education, or energy Key Core teams coordinate neighborhood efforts Neighborhood Stewardship Teams Civic Communities of Practice Meta-Community City/Metro Area
  21. 21. •Critical mass (30%+) of Boston-area neighborhoods and small towns have active stewardship teams making visible progress on 4+ civic issues •Metro-wide communities of practice on the full array of civic issues engage 80%+ of neighborhood stewardship teams as well as key institutions (all sectors) •10%+ improvements in targeted results for 80% of neighborhoods that have been active for 5+ years •Collaborating with 40+ peer cities in U.S. and beyond¹ 21 2020: Reaching the tipping point for transformative civic stewardship in neighborhoods city-wide… ¹Given that 100 cities in the U.S. account for 75% of its GDP, achieving 30% neighborhood penetrationin 40 cities could have transformative effectsat a national level—via local community efforts and by broader programs and policies enhanced by widespread,rigorous civic engagement.
  22. 22. 22 Slides 23-27 outline preliminary draft of a Civic Shift action-learning plan
  23. 23. 23 Participative, recursive processes for designing, launching, and scaling action-learning labs Hold Design Charettes³ Launch Action-Learning Labs⁴ Expand scope, scale & stakeholders • Active participants with civic capabilities and passion to improveresults;planstohold informal/structuredcharettes² • New insights & relationships • Determine initiatives for action-learning labs • Form meta-community core group to provide leadership • Breakthrough civic results • Greater will and skill for civic stewardship applications • Increased rigor and legitimacy of SCS discipline CivicShift“meta-community” supports and sponsors overall initiative: • Skilled stewardship teams and communities of practice, working within and across neighborhoods • Institutions across sectors that collaborate and contribute • Civic stewardship infrastructure (measures, methods,media,funding,etc.) • New issues and priorities • More neighborhoods & cities • Engage large-scale institutions • Local and extra-local civic stewardship players (specialists, researchers, etc.) • Consolidate distributed insights and proposals to shape major policies and programs • Build thriving meta- communities at neighborhood, city-wide, and inter-city levels • Convene 3+ neighborhood- based core teams and city- wide Civic Shift participants • Compare& coordinateproposals for local SCS initiatives: topics, goals, strategies, skill-building, alliances,facilities,funding,etc. • Form local stewardship teams on targeted topics (health,etc.) • Identify topics & coordinators for civic communitiesof practice • Identify key institutions and coalitions to involve and how • Scale, replicate, and connect systematic civic stewardship efforts for greater impact and capacity worldwide Action-Learning Outcomes Scan and Engage City-wide Identify neighborhood- based groups & city-wide Civic Shift participants¹ who want to build and apply civicstewardshipcapabilities • Broad scan of metro-area neighborhood-based organizations& initiatives • Engage and assess neighborhood groups and stakeholders • Identify & prepare groupsfor charettes² ¹CivicShiftparticipants(akameta-community)include communitymembers,institutions(allsectors),consultants/civicspecialists(measures,media,etc.),researchers,funders&policy-makers ²Selection criteria include: results-driven,collaborative,innovative, and oriented to aligning goals across levels (local to global). ³Charettesinclude informal, small-group exploratory conversations as well as structured, large-group events. ⁴Action-LearningLabs include “micro-labs”that meet minimum critical specifications(see p. 25) as well as large-scaleefforts.
  24. 24. 24 The charette process begins by engaging a community-based team or coalition, which takes the lead in a public, participative analysis of a targeted outcome. Charette participants benefit directly via skills, relationships, and professional opportunities, while they build civic capacity and create solutions that improve community wellbeing.¹ Meta-community provides coaching, system-development, institutional access, and scaling Neighborhood #1 forms design team to collect and analyze data (re: local outcomes, priorities, opportunities, assets, etc.) as prep for charettes Target priority outcome (e.g., reduce human and financial costs of chronic diseases) • Collect and analyze population-level results, influencing factors, segment characteristics, etc. • Talk with outcome-related (e.g., health) experts and relevant organizations to learn about improvement strategies (e.g., screening, prevention, early treatment, etc.) • Connect with process experts about ways to engage residents and stakeholders in participative problem-solving and collective action Neighborhood #2 forms design team… Neighborhood #3 Forms design team… Healthcare stewardship team continues action-learning efforts for improved results Neighborhood #3 stewardship team Engage participants via charettes, conversations, surveys, public dialogues, pilot projects, etc.: How can we best discover and apply solutions in our community for breakthrough results? ¹See Civic Shift proposal Action-Learning Lab Design Charette Activities CommunitiesofPractice Neighborhoods Meta-community Neighborhood #2 stewardship team Community of practice promotes learning, innovation, and collaboration across localities Participation methods Monetization LeadershipSocial media MeasuresHealth Strategies
  25. 25. • Stewardship teams from 3+ neighborhoods with a shared, measurable goal (e.g.,health) collaborate as a community of practice • Baseline skills are stewardship methods, measurement, and social media; building capacity for monetization and scaling • Participants are results-driven, innovative, collaborative, and multi-level (local+) • Labs are SCS microcosms; replicable & scalable • Action-learning labs are mini social movements • Innovators and early adopters design and implement robust solutions • Early majority (about 30%) achieves tipping point for culture shift • Innovators connect across localities (neighborhoods, towns & cities) to build a social movement for change Target people ready for changeMinimum critical elements Action-learning lab evolution • Outreach & gatherings for residents, organizations& other stakeholders • Orientation to SCS approach • Design charettes help participants define a targeted issue & get organized • Participants begin to establish critical elements: setting goals, defining measures, training for participative problem solving, etc. • Begin with ready group of residents (say, 200 households) to participate in a phase one effort • Participative problem-solving and civic- engagementmethodsraiseawarenessand motivate changes thatimprovescreeningrates • Measure results and share success stories • Target next wave of households& increase involvement of key institutions… Innovation adoption curve • “Lean innovation” strategy produces custom solutions that get measurable results quickly • Microcosm approach intensifies ownership and spurs action • Seed investments can be catalytic • Action-learning transforms people as they transform their communities Accelerate action-learning • Frame challenge as a measurable goal —e.g., cancer-screening rates—and target key attitudes, behaviors, and policies • Conduct surveys, pilots, citizen councils, 100-day projects, etc. to test ideas and improve them quickly and participatively • Recruit external as wellas local participants for more ideas and for the resources and influence required to enact them 25 CommunitiesofPractice Neighborhoods Meta-community
  26. 26. An SCS meta-communitybuilds skills, relationships,systems & resources for the Civic Shift initiative CIVIC ACTIVISTS engage participants at neighborhood and city-wide levels to take on priority issues (such as specific outcomes related to health or education) CONSULTANTS help team members & others learn skills and methods for goal-setting, problem-solving, innovation, engagement, project management, leadership, measures, etc. FUNDERS & INVESTORS provide start-up funding (primarily for team and community leaders); and help develop sustainable self-funding strategies INSTITUTIONAL PLAYERS (all sectors) offer skilled stewardship team members, infrastructure capabilities, legitimacy, and access to influential supporters RESEARCHERS help assess civic outcomes and capabilities; identify key success factors, quantify opportunities, and promote continuous action- learning TECHNOLOGISTS develop and support collaborative technologies & social media for learning, communication, promotions, surveys, and connecting people POLICY-MAKERS promote legislation and funding for institutional public engagement and increased civic capacity; support issue-specific projects EXPERTS & PLANNERS share expertise on civic issues (health, education, etc.) and urban planning and design; help engage broad participation on targeted topics JOURNALISTS, ARTISTS & DESIGNERS foster engagement and awareness; tell stories, spread ideas across localities, and inspire civic commitment 26
  27. 27. 27 Engage community leaders and other civic participants, including specialists, researchers, institution leaders, designers, policy-makers, and funders Hold Civic Shift design charettes to organize and prepare action-learning labs¹ Launch action-learning labs in 2013 and scale from there ¹See Civic Shift proposal
  28. 28. 28 Slides 29-38 provide additional detail on components of the SCS model
  29. 29. Monetization to ensure sustained funding for critical coordination and development functions Measures of civic outcomes—health, housing, education, etc.—for guiding & validating stewardship efforts Methods promote participative learning, innovation, and collaboration among diverse players 29 The multi-dimensional structure integrates and animates a civic stewardship system Multi-Dimensional Structure Media enhance methods for distributed participation, coordination, and increasing visibility and influence Leadership development for organizing, strategy-making, weaving, innovating, etc. Environment design to scaffold action-learning, connecting, and motivation • Neighborhood Stewardship Teams • Civic Communities of Practice • SCS Meta-Community Principles are action- learning, inclusive connecting, and aligning to shared goals Purpose: Organize citizens & institutions to shape civic practices for local & global well-being SCS Model components & related capabilities Note: There are a number of systemic models for guiding civic initiatives,including ones focused on comprehensive community change (e.g., Center for the Study of Social Policy framework) and multi-stakeholder collaboration(cf. functions associatedwith FSG’s “backbone organization”).The most distinctive element of the SCS model is its multi-dimensional structure,which integratesboth learning and action, and works across levels (within and across communities and cities).
  30. 30. 30 Description: San Diego’s Diamond district includes 10 neighborhoods and 88,000 people, primarily low income. The Village at Market Street aims to improve social, economic and environmental outcomes for residents and stakeholders. Other neighborhood/town cases: Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative; Lawrence Community Works; Harlem Children’s Zone; Promise Neighborhoods; DamariscottaHeart and Soul; (cf. Aspen Institute ”Voices from the Field,” 2010) Site and discipline development issues •M-D Structure: How to structure stewardship teams to align and achieve goals at both local and city-wide levels? How to promote city-wide communities of practice for sharing successes and fostering collaboration across distributed, independent groups & organizations? •Methods & Media: What are the best methods for promoting informed, participative problem-solving at the local level? How to leverage social media technologies to expand access & capability? •Measurement: How to measure population-based results for neighborhood and multi-neighborhood initiatives? •Monetization: How to monetize civic improvements to pay for staffing, training, facilities & projects for locally-led civic stewardship? •Meta-Community: How to accelerate and scale development and applications both within and across cities, in the U.S. and beyond? ¹The Villageat Market Creek 2010 Social and Economic Impact Report (35, 14) (jacobscenter.org/Stay Informed/ResourceLibrary ) “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a network of dedicated people and organizations to raise a village….Since 1998, Working Teams have served as the primary platform for residents to lead change in revitalizing their neighborhood.”¹ Multi-Dimensional Structure: “Working Teams” focus on civic issues such as built environment, economy, education, health, safety & culture •Business development team helped create 35 new businesses and 600+ jobs •Health team coordinated the elimination of 60 units of substandard, mold-infested housing •Safety team implemented program that helped 73% of local ex- offenders get jobs (vs. 9% state-wide), with 8% recidivism (vs. 75%) “Learning Partnerships” connect teams across neighborhoods for peer- to-peer learning and engaging organizations •Cultural Learning Partnership includes several arts and culture working teams and other cultural groups and institutions city-wide Methods for engaging residents in participative problem-solving and design include: town hall forums, “living room meetings,” joint working team gatherings, community surveys and focus groups Measurement at the Diamond district level focuses on indicators related to strategic goals, for example: •Civic participation (900 residents on working teams), Economy (new businesses), and Safety (40% reduction in gang interventions) Monetization for sustained self-funding: Staff and activities are funded largely through revenues from building leases and impact- oriented grants and loans from government agencies and foundations •Hundreds of residents benefit from job creation; hundreds more have preferred stock in the Market Street development company Meta-Community: City-wide, the Connecting Communities Learning Exchange convenes local community organizers for collective learning •More broadly, in 2010 nearly 4000 visitors from 31 states and 17 countries participated in conferences, workshops, and site visits RESULTS Photo:MarketCreek2010ImpactReport
  31. 31. 31 Civic Communities of Practice • Assess landscape of practices and results across localities on a targeted issue • Discover and diffuse ideas, skills, and innovations across localities • Engage institutions and promote multi-stakeholder collaboration • Operate within and across cities • Participants: Members of stewardship teams and city-wide institutions focused on a targeted civic issue; with coordinator City/Metro Meta-Community • Strategic guidance & support for stewardship teams and communities of practice • Coaching and training on tools, methods, and values • Support for measurement, monetization & social media • Operates at neighborhood, city, and inter-city levels • Expanding scope, scale, and stakeholder involvement • Participants: Members passionate about promoting general civic stewardship processes and structures (versus specific civic issues); core group provides overall leadership for the labs and expansion efforts Civic Shift/Boston Core structures Neighborhood Stewardship Teams* • Assess conditions related to a targeted issue for the local population (average 5000) • Engage stakeholders • Coalesce vision & desired outcomes • Lead public problem-solving and civic-engagement efforts for improved results • Measure and report outcomes • Participants: Local residents and other stakeholders passionate about a targeted civic issue; with skilled coach *Local stewardshipteams are launched and coordinated by local SCS “core teams” (or equivalent organizationalentities).They are based in bounded geographic areas with local identities (institutional& cultural),typically with 3,000-10,000 people. Terms for teams and other structures are provisional and will evolve as the lab progresses. Neighborhood (pop. 3,000-10,000) Stewardship Teams focused on a civic issue, such as health, education,or energy Key Core Teams coordinate neighborhood efforts Neighborhood Stewardship Teams Civic Communities of Practice Meta-Community City/Metro Area Civic Communities of Practice promote learning, innovation, and collective action among residents and stakeholders across localities Neighborhood Stewardship Teams address targeted issues and achieve measurable results; core teams coordinate local efforts City/Metro Meta-Community provides an open-source forum for participants to build & share civic stewardship capabilities
  32. 32. ²Illustrativeestimates cited here are for cities with populations of approximately 100,000. (There are about 300 cities over 100,000 in the U.S.) 32 Motivation: Decades of research and application show the power of three basic conditions¹: •Clear, measurable goals •Valid information on results •Skills & tools for making progress Innovation: Learning and innovation thrive on iterative action-learning cycles, in which ongoing adjustments are guided by information on outcomes Monetization: Recognizing and rewarding the value of civic stewardship depends on valid measures of costs & benefits Measurement helps monetize results by validating the value of civic-stewardship benefits for residents, institutions, and society² ¹Other key factors include group norms and rewards, but rewards depend on valid measures of results, and group norms are mutually shaped by motivation conditions
  33. 33. INSTITUTIONAL INVESTMENTS •Public utility saves $1 million in penalties by contracting with local “green neighborhoods” that commit to 20% reductions in average energy consumption* •“Accountable care organization” saves $2 million by contracting with local “healthy community” neighborhoods that commit to 20% reductions in diabetes rates and 50% increase in cancer screening rates* •Foundations and venture philanthropists provide “program-related investments” or low-interest loans for projects that align with their missions SOCIAL IMPACT BONDS •National and state government agencies contract with “social impact bond-issuing organizations” for social service outcomes; investments can go to neighborhood initiatives improving results on array of civic functions (for example, reduce ex-offender recidivism by 20 people and save $1 million/year; cf. report on U.S., U.K. and city & state applications). MONETIZING CONSUMER COLLABORATION •Residents organize coops or other mechanisms to contract for beneficial arrangements with vendors of products and services, including sale of market information; local cooperation can create value by fostering a “sharing economy” NEIGHBORHOOD SELF-INVESTMENTS •Neighborhood councils collect and allocate resident dues—average about $50/resident/year—for funding stewardship-team coaching and projects •Crowd-sourced financing for stewardship team coaches and specific projects (for example, Kickstarter, Kiva, Neighbor.ly and StartSomeGood); public offerings of “community shares” to promote community ventures VOLUNTARY AND IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS •Individuals participate for personal & professional growth opportunities, social connectivity & making a difference in the world •Businesses commit people and resources for employees’ professional development, market reputation, and to achieve civic-engagement and strategic goals (particularly when these include social and environmental as well as market objectives) •Faith-based organizations provide “time, talent, and treasure” to local civic initiatives as part of “social justice” mission *Estimatesfor illustration 33Note: See also 130 Ways to fundyour social venture at Social Earth; and a Clinton Global Initiative working group on “community investing”
  34. 34. 34 Community identity and social trust foster the success of local organizations—including businesses, schools, civic groups, and others—which in turn, further strengthen a community’s sense of collective efficacy and shared purpose.² • Share valuable goods, skills, and knowledge via barter and other cooperative methods. • Create new income opportunities by using local purchasing power, business incubation centers, microloans, community shares, and other ways (e.g., arts fairs) to promote local businesses and freelance employment. • Leverage investments in institutional policies and programs by improving quality and efficacy—in areas such as education,public safety,and infrastructure—viaparticipation in planning, budgeting, continuous improvement, and provision (including preferences for local vendors).³ • Capture a percentageof savingsin governmentexpendituresdue to communityaction (such as preventative carethatreduces healthcarecosts; or local coalitions thatreduce crime and recidivism).Communities can monetize gains in civic outcomes via contracts with relevant institutions (e.g., accountable care organizations and government social impact bonds). Government costs at neighborhood level (current) Informal economy opportunity (additional) Local economy opportunity (additional) Key Leverage $90m Capture $10m Create $10m Share $5m CommunityEconomyOpportunities¹ ²For evidence of the link between community and economy, seeresearchonsocialcapital,e.g.,Putnam (1994)&Fukuyama(1996)atregional&nationallevels;at locallevel,seeTheIdeaofa LocalEconomy(Berry,2001) LocalDollars,LocalSense(Shuman,2006),orblogposton civicengagement&economicsuccess(Levine,2011);see alsoresearchontheeffectof“collectiveefficacy”onhealth andsafetyoutcomes(Sampson,2012). ¹Numbers for “community economy” methods are gross estimates— meant to illustrate order-of-magnitudeof opportunities,which vary widely by locality. Average annual U.S.governmentexpenditures(alllevels) thataremost influenced bylocal conditions are about $10k/resident nationwide.Roughcalculations:Healthcare $1.2t, Education.8t, Welfare .7t, Public Safety .3t and related interest .15t for U.S. population of ~315m (Source); thus, for a “standard”neighborhood of 10,000 people, total expenditures are about $100m/year. ³Eachmonetizationapproachcanfoster successinothers;forexample,increasing theefficacyof governmentservicesmay leadtoinsightsforbusinessstart-ups; cooperativesmaygrowintobusinesses; andanadded$15minlocalincome(via Create&Share)equatesto100’sofliving- wagejobs,withbenefitsacrosstheboard.
  35. 35. SCS promotes the practice of universal principles for shared purposes Learning about the issues and innovative solutions…even when these challenge long-held basic assumptions Aligning to shared goals for the greater good…even as the vision evolves based on new experiences and insights Building civic capacity to improve results in terms of strength, scale, scope, and sustainability Achieving results in targeted areas (health, education, etc.) Becoming more conscious, loving members of interwoven, transformational communities, for current and future generations¹ Connecting with diverse others to build trust and reciprocity…even with those who have conflicting interests and ideologies Purposes Principles ¹cf. Martin Luther King’s assertion that “Love is mankind’s most potent weapon for personal and social transformation” 35 Purposes complement principles, both fundamental…and transformational
  36. 36. IF we can create civic system conditions that: 1. Define Civic Value (i.e., outcomes related to health, education, safety, etc.) in measurable economic terms 2. Organize capable, accountable civic groups within and across Neighborhoods City-wide, including residents and institutional stakeholders 3. Skillfully apply participatory Methods, social media, and other tools for learning and collaboration to shape socio-behavioral norms as well as more informed policies and programs 4. Measure improvements in civic outcomes attributable to stewardship groups (e.g., neighborhood teams and multi-stakeholder coalitions) 5. Monetize the value of improved civic outcomes to expand available resources for stewardship groups… THEN communities and cities can generate increasing civic well-being in self-sustaining ways, while building capacity for continuing advances, and creating transformational options for the future. 36 Civic Value & Capacity Monetization Measures Civic Methods & Media City-wide Communities of practice Stewardship teams Residents & Institutions Coalitions Neighborhoods City-wide Cultural norms Policies & Programs Products/Services Funds Influence Capabilities Resources
  37. 37. New capacity for collaborative learning and action Technology² Millennial Mindset Social-Psychology Participative democracy / Government gridlock Increased focus on collaboration, innovation, and results Collaboration tools / Social media Technical fixes: innovative programs, products & services Civic entrepreneurs / New social movements Policyapplications/ Behavioraleconomics Structural options: teams, communities, organizations, and networks New methods for promoting participative learning & innovation High profile neighborhood- and city-based design/develop initiatives Worldwide urbanization & growing global influence of cities Proliferationof real/virtual communitiesof place,practice, interest,etc. Cities & Communities •SeeClickFix •E-Democracy.org •Neighborland •Neighbors for Neighbors •Goodneighbors •Nextdoor •Blockboard •ChangebyUs •City 2.0 •New Urban Mechanics •Code for America •MIT Civic Media lab •Climate Lab Emerging mindset and socio- technical methods respond to growing demands of the new urban age •Washington DC data •San Francisco data •Chicago crime data •Charlotte civic results •Cincinnati educ. data “Big data” on range of civic outcomes available at local level 37 •Open Living Labs •Societal ”fixes” blog •Harvard Innovation lab ²Like social-psychology applicationslisted here (and p. 13), these civic technology applications represent a small sample in a burgeoning field We can draw on a deep and diverse repertoire of methods whose efficacy has been proven by successful organizations. Now it is time to apply these for breakthrough results in the civic sector.¹ ¹There is much to learn; after all, in the U.S. alone, tens of billions are spent annually for research, consulting, and education to support business development. Meanwhile, there are over 1 million non-profits in the U.S., most of which struggle to set and achieve measurable goals; or to collaborate on shared missions. “Cities rather than states are becoming the islands of governance on which the future world order will be built.” -- Parag Khanna, Director Global Governance Initiative, Foreign Policy, 2010 •Future Search •Appreciative Inquiry •Public workshops •Human-Centered Design •21st C. Town Meetings •Collective Impact network •Communities of practice •Behavioral green policy •Behavioral science politics Promoting civic shifts for societal well-being Monetizingcivicvalue •SocialImpactBonds (Examples) •Communityfunding •Sharing economy
  38. 38. “By making communities of our cities we take a giant stride toward world community, and in the end lasting peace will come when…world community has been achieved.” -- Lawrence Hayworth, The Good City Facebookinteractionsacrosscitiesworldwide(Source)PhotosfromHighLine(NYC)website 38 Practicing civic stewardship transforms us as we transform the world…

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