Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Making Social Identity Part of Community Leadership Development

1,938 views

Published on

Shared and effective community leadership can be helped or hindered by our conceptions of and experiences with people from different identity groups. Add to that the reality that our experiences are embedded in larger social identity structures and dynamics within communities that in many cases are reinforcing negative patterns. So how can social identity best be raised and addressed in community leadership development programs? How can ideas about social identity expand our thinking about community and about leadership? We are on a journey to develop a curriculum that can serve as a resource to community leaders (and by leaders we mean everyone contributing to leadership, not just those with a formal leadership role). Specifically we aim to build awareness about social identity dynamics in people and communities to enhance the ability of individuals and groups to work together more effectively in order to achieve "common good" community outcomes.

Published in: Education, Business
  • Be the first to comment

Making Social Identity Part of Community Leadership Development

  1. 1. KELLY H A NNUM C ENTER FOR C REA TIVE LEA DERSH IP TIM LEISMA N RESEA RC H CONSULTANT STEP H ANIE WA LKER IMP A C T G REENSB ORO P ROG RA M, C C L Social Identity and Community Leadership Development (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  2. 2. Our Discussion  How can social identity be raised and addressed in community leadership development programs?  How can ideas about social identity expand our thinking about community and about leadership? (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  3. 3. Social Identity …the parts of a person’s identity that come from belonging to or being associated with particular groups including, but not limited to, age, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, nationality, and socioeconomic status. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  4. 4. Functions of Social Identity We use social identity to: • Categorize people into groups, • Identify with groups ourselves, • Compare groups with each other, usually preferring our own groups to others. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  5. 5. Social Identity Basic Tenets  We have multiple identities  It’s human nature to want to “fit in” as well as to be unique  Some identities are visible, others are less apparent  We continually gain, lose, or change certain aspects of our identity, while others are fixed (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  6. 6. Social Identity Basic Tenets (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership  Identities can be associated with positive or negative stereotypes  Social identities create a multifaceted lens through which we view the world and how we are viewed  Which identities are most salient will depend on context
  7. 7. Why it Matters • Knowing which lenses you are seeing through • Increasing ability to access a broader perspective • Better navigate complex situations and relationships (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  8. 8. The Need (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership The world is increasingly: V = Volatile U = Uncertain C = Complex A = Ambiguous
  9. 9. Leadership Effective leadership results in Direction, Alignment, and Commitment among people with shared goals or challenges. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  10. 10. Leadership Development  Everyone can develop leadership skills.  Complex challenges are better served with diverse leaders working together.  Developing leadership goes beyond developing individual leaders. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  11. 11. Where interventions can occur Societal Community/ Regional Organizational/ Institutional Group Individual (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  12. 12. Project Overview and Goals Develop and test a module based on social identity concepts that fosters self-awareness, other-awareness, and context-awareness to generate leadership processes that result in shared direction, alignment, and commitment in communities. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  13. 13. Our Starting Point  Our own expertise and experiences  Literature review  Interviews (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  14. 14. Design Considerations  Level of Challenge  Single versus multiple identity  Start from commonalties or difference  How directly to address privilege/power  Trust in the group  Individual work versus system work  Fixing what’s “wrong” versus building what’s “right” (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  15. 15. Self-awareness  Identifying multiple identities and intersectionality  Identifying areas of integration as well as incongruence  Understanding leader identity  Identifying ways we respond to external labeling (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  16. 16. Other-awareness Articulating aspects of identity: Given versus Chosen Visible versus Invisible Public versus Private Pride versus shame Accepted/integrated versus disputed/incongruent Naming and challenging implicit leadership assumptions Understanding respect and the connection to identity salience (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  17. 17. Context-awareness  Identifying the underlying faultlines in communities and in work  Understanding identity threat as well as positive and negative stereotyping.  Awareness of triggers of social identity tension and conflict  Mapping social identity networks (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  18. 18. Self-Awareness Multiple Identities Map Chosen Given Core (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  19. 19. Mapping Identities in Community  How do social identities show up in organizational and community groups? Which identities are “at the table?”  How do our identities impact how we see the work?  How do the identities of those doing community work reflect the identities of those intended to benefit from or may be harmed by that work? (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  20. 20. Context: Greensboro, NC (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  21. 21. IMPACT Greensboro IMPACT Greensboro is a place-based leadership program which invests in community participants for the purpose of building social capital. The goal of IMPACT Greensboro is to create a vibrant network of community “Change Agents” who are equipped to identify and tackle community issues. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  22. 22. Underlying Process of IMPACT Greensboro  Participant selection  Leadership development training  Facilitation  Network of Change Agents (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
  23. 23. Questions  How can social identity be raised and addressed in community leadership development programs?  How can ideas about social identity expand our thinking about community and about leadership? (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership

×