Programming Languages

2,990 views

Published on

Specifications and requirements for the various programming languages and software packages to be used in the NSW BOS SDD course.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,990
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
762
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
122
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Programming Languages

  1. 1. Software Design and Development Programming Languages in SDD
  2. 2. Contents Course Specifications 1.Language Specifications 5. CPU simulation 2. Language requirements 6. Evolution - LOGIC 3. Event-driven languages 7. Developer’s view of Hardware 4. Prototyping & RAD NSW BOS Course Specifications
  3. 3. Language Specifications Contents The syllabus does not prescribe a single coding language for implementation of programs but advocates a range of high level languages. Students are required to be proficient in using at least one of the currently approved languages but will not be asked to interpret or produce code as part of the external assessment. The languages chosen for inclusion in the approved list are ones which are generally available and support structured programming concepts.
  4. 4. General language requirements Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • use the following data types: • numeric (integer and real) • character • string data • use record and array data types including multi-dimensional arrays and arrays of records; • use simple variables of type: • CHARACTER • REAL • INTEGER • STRING • use meaningful identifiers; • use parentheses in creating expressions
  5. 5. General language requirements continued Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • use the arithmetic operators of • ADDITION • SUBTRACTION • MULTIPLICATION • DIVISION • use string handling operations to extract characters from a string • use the logical operators of • AND • OR • NOT
  6. 6. General language requirements continued Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: •use relational operators which provide the equivalents of the following functions: EQUAL TO NOT EQUAL TO GREATER THAN GREATER THAN OR EQUAL TO LESS THAN LESS LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO • use and create procedures which may require parameters: • subprograms • subroutines • input data from the keyboard and/or a data file • write output to the screen and/or a data file
  7. 7. General language requirements continued Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • use selection statements equivalent to: (i) IF-ELSE-ENDIF IF <condition TRUE > THEN <statement sequence 1> ELSE <statement sequence 2> ENDIF ii) CASE-ENDCASE CASE <control expression> OF <case value list> ENDCASE
  8. 8. General language requirements continued Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • use repetition statements equivalent to: (iii) REPEAT-UNTIL REPEAT <statement sequence> UNTIL <condition TRUE> (iv) WHILE-ENDWHILE WHILE <condition TRUE> DO <statement sequence> ENDWHILE (v) FOR-ENDFOR FOR <control variable> taking <initial value> TO <final value> BY steps of 1 DO <statement sequence> ENDFOR
  9. 9. General language requirements continued Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • include COMMENTS (REMARKS) in the code to document the program; • include the use of a debugging facility such as: • single instruction stepping • trace • breakpoints • allow the reading and writing of sequential and random files • experience the use of both a compiler and an interpreter. Appropriate Languages: • Pascal • a structured version of BASIC.
  10. 10. Event-driven Languages Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • create scripts which respond to • button presses • mouse actions and make use of standard control structures • should not be limited to simple linking of screens. •Appropriate Languages: • Visual Basic • Hypercard • Delphi (limited functions only) • REALBasic.
  11. 11. Prototyping and Rapid Applications Development Contents The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • create several linked pages, cards or screens; • create graphic and text elements on the: • pages • cards • screens • accept input from the keyboard; • store and access data; • perform mathematical operations on the data; • perform the following operations on the data • sorting • searching • reporting • use a scripting language which permits the handling of system events such as • mouse button presses • keystrokes Appropriate languages: • Visual Basic • Hypercard • Delphi (limited functions only) • Access • Filemaker-Pro • REALBasic
  12. 12. Software used to simulate CPU Contents processing of instructions The programming language chosen should allow the students to: • simulate the processing of machine code instructions. Appropriate languages: •TIM • ‘Under the Hood’ including a CPU simulation.
  13. 13. Evolution of Programming Languages Contents Logic paradigm Students should design and create a simple expert system using an expert system shell, as an example of the logic paradigm. The programming language chosen must allow the students to: • enter simple IF-THEN rules • manipulate rules: • add • remove • edit • query the expert system • display the rules that the system used to reach a conclusion. Appropriate software: • Eshell • ESIE • Clixpert • Prolog
  14. 14. The Software Developer’s Contents view of the hardware The software package(s) chosen must allow the students to: • Drag and drop logic gate symbols to create a circuit • Edit existing designs • Print circuit designs • Simulate the working of designed circuits to show outputs for selected input values. Appropriate software: • LogicSim • LogicCircuits • Crocodile Clips

×