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How To Act As A Business In
A World In Which User
Feedback And Reviews Are
Critical To Your Reputation
And Business
Lisa	
...
SOCIAL COMMERCE BY THE
NUMBERS
2	
  
64%	
  	
  
Consumers	
  who	
  search	
  
for	
  reviews	
  before	
  
making	
  purchase	
  
	
  
	
  
5-­‐9%	
  	
  
Re...
•  Unfair	
  Business	
  Prac.ces	
  
Court	
  rejected	
  claim	
  that	
  Yelp	
  pracBces	
  were	
  extorBon	
  since	...
ADDRESSING BAD
REVIEWS
5	
  
COPYRIGHT AS A SHIELD
•  Medical	
  Jus.ce	
  
Created	
  paBent	
  contracts	
  assigning	
  IP	
  in	
  consumer	
  revi...
CONSUMER GAG AGREEMENTS
Kleargear.com’s	
  Self-­‐inflicted	
  Wound	
  
Improper	
  a.empt	
  to	
  enforce	
  non-­‐
disp...
RESPONDING TO
REVIEWS
•  Rule	
  #1:	
  Be	
  Aware	
  of	
  Your	
  Reviews	
  
•  Own	
  Your	
  NegaBve	
  Reviews	
  
...
POLICING SITE REVIEWS
•  Community	
  verificaBon,	
  flagging,	
  
reporBng	
  
•  User	
  authenBcaBon	
  	
  
(Angie’s	
 ...
APPENDIX 1: REFERENCE
•  5	
  FascinaBng	
  Yelp	
  Facts,	
  Local	
  Vox	
  (Jan.	
  22,	
  2014).	
  
•  Crowd-­‐source...
APPENDIX 2: LISA BORODKIN
11	
  
Principal	
  and	
  Founder	
  of	
  Lisa	
  Borodkin,	
  A.orney	
  at	
  Law	
  
Entert...
APPENDIX 3: BENNET KELLEY

Founder	
  of	
  the	
  INTERNET	
  LAW	
  CENTER	
  in	
  Santa	
  Monica	
  
Host	
  of	
  CY...
Slides  on  Reward  Programs  
Stanford  6-­‐8-­‐15
Edward	
  B.	
  Chansky	
  
Shareholder	
  	
  
Greenberg	
  Traurig,	...
Three  Types  of  Programs
•  TradiBonal	
  “Rewards”	
  
•  Gij	
  Cards	
  
•  Groupon-­‐Style	
  Discounts	
  
•  TradiBonal	
  Rewards	
  
•  Credit	
  Card	
  and	
  Airlines	
  as	
  the	
  model	
  
•  Reserve	
  the	
  Right	
  ...
•  Gij	
  Cards	
  
•  Front	
  end	
  restricBons	
  on	
  expiraBon	
  dates	
  and	
  dormancy	
  fees.	
  
•  Back	
  ...
•  Hybrid	
  Groupon-­‐Style	
  Program	
  
•  Pay	
  $10	
  for	
  the	
  right	
  to	
  obtain	
  a	
  $20	
  extra-­‐la...
Best Practices for
Recommendation Engines
Laurence	
  Wilson,	
  Yelp	
  Inc.	
  
More Obvious
Less Obvious
Legal Question
v.
Editorial Discretion
Transparency
How to Protect Valuable Data
June 8, 2015
Reed Freeman
WilmerHale
FTC In a Nutshell
•  Nation’s Consumer Protection Agency
•  Authority over most of economy (except, in general,...
WilmerHale
FTC Data Security Standard
The FTC takes the position (being tested now in litigation) that Section 5
of the FT...
WilmerHale
1. Written Information Security Program
•  Have a comprehensive security program that is reasonably designed to...
WilmerHale
2. Identify Reasonably Foreseeable Risks
•  Identify material internal and external risks to the security, conf...
WilmerHale
3. Add Controls for Identified Risks Where Necessary;
then Test and Monitor:
•  Design and implement reasonable...
WilmerHale
4. Manage Service Providers Carefully:
•  Develop and use of reasonable steps to select and retain
service prov...
WilmerHale
5. Update Security Program As Necessary:
•  Evaluate and adjust your information security program in
light of t...
 
FTC’s
“Amended	
  Guides	
  Concerning	
  the	
  Use	
  of	
  Endorsements	
  
and	
  Testimonials	
  in	
  Advertising”...
Francine Ward is a business and intellectual property attorney, with a focus on copyrights, trademarks,
publishing, entert...
¨  The FTC Guides Concerning Use of Endorsements and
Testimonials in Advertising - originally written in the
1970s; amend...
1.  Endorsements can be made explicitly or implicitly by words,
demonstrations, signatures, likenesses, or any other ident...
1.  Endorser MUST be real person
2.  Clearly & conspicuously disclosed
3.  Accurately reflects endorser’s belief/experienc...
¨  Customer Identification. Advertisers use consumer testimonials to gain
customer trust because customers identify with ...
¨  Advertiser must have reasonable basis and proof that
¤  endorser uses product
¤  endorser’s claim reflects their cla...
1.  Read and understand the Guidelines
2.  Endorsements can be made by words or deeds
3.  Don’t ask your employees to adve...
Francine	
  D.	
  Ward,	
  Esq.	
  
	
  
Business & Intellectual Property Attorney
Trademarks | Copyrights | Book Contract...
How To Act As A Business In A World In Which User Feedback And Reviews Are Critical To Your Reputation And Business
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How To Act As A Business In A World In Which User Feedback And Reviews Are Critical To Your Reputation And Business

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12th Annual Stanford E-commerce Best Practices Conference presentation (Lisa Borodkin, Attorney at Law and Bennett Kelly, Internet Law Center)

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How To Act As A Business In A World In Which User Feedback And Reviews Are Critical To Your Reputation And Business

  1. 1. How To Act As A Business In A World In Which User Feedback And Reviews Are Critical To Your Reputation And Business Lisa  Borodkin,  A.orney  at  Law   Bennet  Kelley,  Internet  Law  Center  
  2. 2. SOCIAL COMMERCE BY THE NUMBERS 2  
  3. 3. 64%     Consumers  who  search   for  reviews  before   making  purchase       5-­‐9%     Revenue  Increase  for   addiBonal  Yelp  Star       89%     Consumers  who  find   online  reviews  to  be   trustworthy       13,  34,  53%   Likelihood  of  prime  Bme   sell  out  for  3,  3.5  and     4-­‐star  restaurants     3  
  4. 4. •  Unfair  Business  Prac.ces   Court  rejected  claim  that  Yelp  pracBces  were  extorBon  since   that  requires  that  liBgant  have  “a  pre-­‐exisBng  right  to  be  free   from  the  threatened  harm,  or  that  the  defendant  had  no  right   to  seek  payment  for  the  service  offered.”    Yelp’s  acBons  were   not  a  “wrongful  use  of  economic  fear”.  Boris  Y.  Levi.,  et  al.  v.  Yelp  Inc.,  No.   11-­‐17676,  2014  U.S.  App.  LEXIS  17079  (9th  Cir.    Sept.  2,  2014)   •  Sec.on  230  Immunity  Challenge   Fact  that  Yelp  created  star  raBng  based  on  reviews,  did  not   “transform  an  interacBve  computer  service  into  a  developer  of   the  underlying  misinformaBon”  for  purposes  of  SecBon  230  of   the  CDA.    Kimzey  v.  Yelp  Inc.,  2014  WL  1805551  (W.D.  Wash.  May  7,  2014).   •  False  Adver.sing   Cal.  Court  of  Appeal  judge  reversed  a  SLAPP  dismissal  of  a   False  AdverBsing  acBon  based  on  Yelp’s  claims  that  each   review  “passed  through  a  ‘filter’  that  gave  consumers  the  most   trusted  reviews.”    Demetriades  v  Yelp!,  2014  WL  3661491  (Cal.  App.  Ct.  July  24,  2014).   •  FTC  Inves.ga.on   Closed  without  comment.   FIVE-STAR LITIGATION* 4  
  5. 5. ADDRESSING BAD REVIEWS 5  
  6. 6. COPYRIGHT AS A SHIELD •  Medical  Jus.ce   Created  paBent  contracts  assigning  IP  in  consumer  reviews  to  doctor.     Abandoned  in  2011.     •  New  York  v.  Network  Associates,  758  N.Y.S.2d  466  (N.Y.  Sup.  Ct.  2003)  –  violated   consumer  protecBon  laws.   •  US  Dep’t  of  Health  and  Human  Services  prohibited  doctor  from  condiBoning   privacy  compliance  with  consent  to  review  prohibiBon.   •  Small  Jus.ce   Acquired  copyright  in  defamatory  post  on  RipOffReport.com     •  Small  JusQce  LLC  v.  Xcentric  Ventures,  LLC,  No.  13-­‐CV-­‐11701,  2015  WL  1431071   (D.  Mass.  Mar.  27,  2015),  appeal  pending.     •  Click  wrap  agreement  sufficient  to  transfer  exclusive  copyright.     “By  posBng  this  report/rebu.al,  I  a.est  this  report  is  valid.  I  am  giving  Rip-­‐Off   Report  irrevocable  rights  to  post  it  on  the  website.  I  acknowledge  that  once  I   post  my  report,  it  will  not  be  removed,  even  at  my  request.”   6  
  7. 7. CONSUMER GAG AGREEMENTS Kleargear.com’s  Self-­‐inflicted  Wound   Improper  a.empt  to  enforce  non-­‐ disparagement  clause  (established  ajer   transacBon  at  issue)  becomes  cause   célèbre,  resulBng  in  judgment  of  $354K   for  consumer.     Palmer  v.  Kleargear.com,  No.  13-­‐cv-­‐00175  (D.  Utah   May  5,  2014).     Kleargear  Fallout   •  California  Passes  AnE-­‐Kleargear  Law  (Civil  Code   SecEon  1670.8(a)(1)):  A  contract  for  the  sale  or   lease  of  consumer  goods  or  services  may  not   include  a  provision  waiving  the  consumer’s  right  to   make  any  statement  regarding  the  seller  or  lessor   or  its  employees  or  agents,  or  concerning  the  goods   or  services.   •  Kleargear  has  not  scared  off  others,  penalty  clauses   sBll  in  use   •  Arizona,  New  York  Courts  Indicate  Gag  Agreements   May  Be  Enforceable   •  FreeLife  Int'l,  Inc.  v.  Am.  Educ.  Music  PublicaQons  Inc.,  No.   CV07-­‐2210-­‐PHXDGC,  2009  WL  3241795  (D.  Ariz.  Oct.  1,  2009)(gag   agreement  not  procedurally  or  substanBvely  unconscionably   under  AZ  law).   •  Gallard  v  Johnston,  No.  1:2014cv04411  1290775  (SDNY  March  19,   2015)  (refusing  to  dismiss  claim  under  gag  agreement).     7  
  8. 8. RESPONDING TO REVIEWS •  Rule  #1:  Be  Aware  of  Your  Reviews   •  Own  Your  NegaBve  Reviews   •  Wisdom  of  the  Masses   •  Increase  Overall  Reviews   •  IniBate  contact  prior  to  posBng  reviews   (Anonymous  VenBng)   •  Direct  Users  to  Review  Sites  You  Approve     •  Unfair  Review  ConsideraBons   •  Does  it  violate  site  terms?   •  Is  it  defamatory?       •  Is  it  material  (Streisand  Effect)?   •  Can  more  content/SEO  bury  it?   8  
  9. 9. POLICING SITE REVIEWS •  Community  verificaBon,  flagging,   reporBng   •  User  authenBcaBon     (Angie’s  List)   •  User  stack  up-­‐voBng  for  quality   •  RaBng  consumers     (Uber,  EBay)   •  Tolerance  for  online  culture   (Amazon  fake  reviews)   9  
  10. 10. APPENDIX 1: REFERENCE •  5  FascinaBng  Yelp  Facts,  Local  Vox  (Jan.  22,  2014).   •  Crowd-­‐sourced  online  reviews  help  fill  restaurant   seats,  study  finds,  UC  Berkley  News  Center  (Sep.  4,   2012).   •  Harvard  Study:  Yelp  Drives  Demand  for   Independent  Restaurants,  Yelp  Official  Blog  (Oct.  5,   2011).   •  David  S.  Ardia,   Free  Speech  Savior  or  Shield  for  Scoundrels:  An   Empirical  Study  of  Intermediary  Immunity  under   SecBon  230  of  the  CommunicaBons  Decency  Act,   43  Loy.  L.A.  L.  Rev.  373  (2010).   •  Michael  Anderson  and    Jeremy  Magruder,     Learning  from  the  Crowd:  Regression  DisconBnuity   EsBmates  of  the  Effects  of  an  Online  Review   Database,  The  Economic  Journal  (Oct.  5,  2011).   •  Cyrus  Farivar,   Emba.led  retailer  KlearGear  fights  back  against   online  review  defeat,  Ars  Technica  (May  20,  2014).   •  Eric  Goldman,   Consumer  Reviews  of  Doctors  and  Copyright  Law,   University  of  Houston  Law  Center,  InsBtute  for   Intellectual  Property  &  InformaBon  Law  (“IPIL”)   Advisory  Board  Dinner,  Houston  (Jan.  2011).   •  Caroline  Myer,   The  Perils  of  PosBng  Scathing  Reviews  on  Yelp  and   Angie's  List,  Forbes  (Jan  7.  2013).   •  Lucille  M.  Ponte,  “ ProtecBng  Brand  Image  or  Gaming  the  System?   Consumer  “Gag”  Contracts  in  an  Age  of   Crowdsourced  RaBngs  and  Reviews,”  William  &   Mary  Business  Law  Review  (2015).   10  
  11. 11. APPENDIX 2: LISA BORODKIN 11   Principal  and  Founder  of  Lisa  Borodkin,  A.orney  at  Law   Entertainment  and  IP  PracBce  in  Los  Angeles   RepresentaBve  cases:  Metallica  v.  Napster;  Williams  v.  Bridgeport   Music;  SEO  and  defamaBon  liBgaBon     Recurring  guest,  THIS  WEEK  IN  LAW  on  TWiT.TV   Op-­‐Ed  columnist,  San  Francisco  Chronicle,  The  Guardian     §  Harvard  University,  A.B.  1990   §  Columbia  University  School  of  Law,  J.D.  1995   §  Law  Clerk,  Hon.  Diane  P.  Wood,  7th  Circuit  Court  of  Appeals  (1996-­‐97)   §  Law  Clerk,  I.  Leo  Glasser,  U.S.  District  Court,  E.D.N.Y.  (1995-­‐96)     Website:  lisaborodkin.com   Twi.er:  @lisaborodkin  
  12. 12. APPENDIX 3: BENNET KELLEY Founder  of  the  INTERNET  LAW  CENTER  in  Santa  Monica   Host  of  CYBER  LAW  AND  BUSINESS  REPORT   Broadcast  through  Webmaster  Radio  and  Podcast  Channels   Nominated  for  LA  Press  Club  Award  for  Best  Public  Affairs  Talk  Radio  Show  in  2014   Honors:   §  Named  One  of  Most  InfluenBal  Lawyers  in  Digital  Media  and     E-­‐Commerce  by  Los  Angeles  Business  Journal  (2014)   §  Past  Co-­‐Chair  of  the  California  Bar  Cyberspace  Commi.ee   §  Selected  By  US  Dep’t  of  Commerce  to  Present  on     U.S.  E-­‐Commerce  Law  as  part  of  2012  U.S.-­‐China  Legal  Exchange     Website:  InternetlLawCenter.net     Blog:  ILCCyberReport.wordpress.com   Tw:  @InternetLawCent   12  
  13. 13. Slides  on  Reward  Programs   Stanford  6-­‐8-­‐15 Edward  B.  Chansky   Shareholder     Greenberg  Traurig,  LLP    
  14. 14. Three  Types  of  Programs •  TradiBonal  “Rewards”   •  Gij  Cards   •  Groupon-­‐Style  Discounts  
  15. 15. •  TradiBonal  Rewards   •  Credit  Card  and  Airlines  as  the  model   •  Reserve  the  Right  to  Terminate/Modify     •  How  to  give  noBce  and  reserve  right  to  change  a  contract  while  maintaining  a   binding  contract.    GIVE  NOTICE!      
  16. 16. •  Gij  Cards   •  Front  end  restricBons  on  expiraBon  dates  and  dormancy  fees.   •  Back  end  escheat  compliance   •  With  address  of  record  for  holder     •  Without  address  of  record  for  holder   •  See  Texas  v.  New  Jersey,  379  U.S.  674  (1965)   •  Single  Purpose  EnBty  to  administer  program  from  a  non-­‐escheat  state?    Make  sure  it  is   not  a  sham.   •  50-­‐state  chart  of  gij  card  &  escheat  laws:     h.p://www.ncsl.org/research/financial-­‐services-­‐and-­‐commerce/gij-­‐cards-­‐ and-­‐cerBficates-­‐statutes-­‐and-­‐legis.aspx    
  17. 17. •  Hybrid  Groupon-­‐Style  Program   •  Pay  $10  for  the  right  to  obtain  a  $20  extra-­‐large  pizza  with  double  cheese.     •  Offer  expires  if  not  used  in  30  days.     •  What’s  lej  ajer  the  30  days?     •  Nothing?      Full  value?      $10  gij  card?     •  Who  has  the  escheat  duty?       •  Groupon?    Pizzeria?    For  how  much?      $20?  (promoBonal  value)      $10?  (“gij  card”  value)   $5?  (amount  merchant  received)  
  18. 18. Best Practices for Recommendation Engines Laurence  Wilson,  Yelp  Inc.  
  19. 19. More Obvious
  20. 20. Less Obvious
  21. 21. Legal Question v. Editorial Discretion
  22. 22. Transparency
  23. 23. How to Protect Valuable Data June 8, 2015 Reed Freeman
  24. 24. WilmerHale FTC In a Nutshell •  Nation’s Consumer Protection Agency •  Authority over most of economy (except, in general, banks, common carriers, and nonprofits). •  Uses Section 5 of the FTC Act (Statute is in equity) •  Deception: A representation or omission regarding a material fact likely to mislead a reasonable consumer under the circumstances. •  Unfairness: An act or practice that causes substantial consumer injury that is not reasonably avoidable by consumers and not outweighed by benefits to consumers or competition. •  Remedies: Injunctive, restitution, disgorgement, recision. No civil penalties for Section 5 violations (yet). 25
  25. 25. WilmerHale FTC Data Security Standard The FTC takes the position (being tested now in litigation) that Section 5 of the FTC Act requires “Reasonable Security” under the circumstances: that companies have reasonable controls against reasonably foreseeable risks to the security, confidentiality, and integrity of personal information, taking into account the size of the company and the sensitivity of the information it holds. •  Tort standard •  NOT strict liability •  What does this mean in practice? 26
  26. 26. WilmerHale 1. Written Information Security Program •  Have a comprehensive security program that is reasonably designed to: (1) address security risks related to the development and management of new and existing products and services for consumers, and (2) protect the security, integrity, and confidentiality of covered information, whether collected by respondent or input into, stored on, captured with, or accessed through a computer using respondent’s products or services. •  Such program, the content and implementation of which must be fully documented in writing, must contain administrative, technical, and physical safeguards appropriate to respondent’s size and complexity, the nature and scope of respondent’s activities, and the sensitivity of the covered information, including: •  Responsible Employee or Employees for Program: •  Designate an employee or employees to coordinate and be accountable for the security program; 27
  27. 27. WilmerHale 2. Identify Reasonably Foreseeable Risks •  Identify material internal and external risks to the security, confidentiality, and integrity of covered information that could result in the unauthorized disclosure, misuse, loss, alteration, destruction, or other possession or is input into, stored on, captured with, or accessed through a computer using respondent’s products or services, and assess of the sufficiency of any safeguards in place to control these risks. •  Assess Existing Safeguards to Address Identified Risks: •  At a minimum, the risk assessment should include consideration of risks in each area of relevant operation, including, but not limited to, 1.  employee training and management, including in secure engineering and defensive programming; 2.  product design, development and research; 3.  secure software design, development, and testing; 4.  review, assessment, and response to third-party security vulnerability reports, and 5.  prevention, detection, and response to attacks, intrusions, or systems failures; 28
  28. 28. WilmerHale 3. Add Controls for Identified Risks Where Necessary; then Test and Monitor: •  Design and implement reasonable safeguards to control the risks identified through risk assessment, and regular testing or monitoring of the effectiveness of the safeguards’ key controls, systems, and procedures, including through reasonable and appropriate software security testing techniques. 29
  29. 29. WilmerHale 4. Manage Service Providers Carefully: •  Develop and use of reasonable steps to select and retain service providers capable of maintaining security practices consistent with this standard, and require service providers by contract to implement and maintain appropriate safeguards. 30
  30. 30. WilmerHale 5. Update Security Program As Necessary: •  Evaluate and adjust your information security program in light of the results of your testing and monitoring, any material changes to your operations or business arrangements, or any other circumstances that you knows or have reason to know may have a material impact on the effectiveness of your information security program. 31
  31. 31.   FTC’s “Amended  Guides  Concerning  the  Use  of  Endorsements   and  Testimonials  in  Advertising”     ******** Monday, June 8, 2015 1:45pmPST Copyright  2015  Francine  D.  Ward.              All  Rights   Reserved.  32
  32. 32. Francine Ward is a business and intellectual property attorney, with a focus on copyrights, trademarks, publishing, entertainment, and social media legal issues. A 1989 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Francine is admitted to practice in New York, California, and the District of Columbia. Additionally, she is admitted to the Bar of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal for the 2nd and 9th Circuits; as well as the U.S. District Courts for the Central District of California and the Southern District of New York. Ward is a member of the ABA-IPL Section’s CLE Board, Chair of the ABA-IPL Terms of Use Subcommittee of the Copyright & Social Media Committee, and Vice Char of the Copyright Interest Group of the IP Section of the California State Bar. Francine is also a Commissioner on the ABA’s Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs. Find her (http://francineward.com/category/legal-blog/), LinkedIn Profile (http://www.linkedin.com/in/trademarklawyer), Facebook Law Fan Page (https://www.facebook.com/Francineward), and her Twitter Law Page (https://twitter.com/Francineward). Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved. 33 About  Francine  D.  Ward,  Esq.  
  33. 33. ¨  The FTC Guides Concerning Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising - originally written in the 1970s; amended 1980; amended October 2009. (16 C.F.R. § 255). ¨  Endorsement -- a claim that consumers are likely to believe as reflecting the opinion, belief, experience of someone other than the advertiser ¨  FTC definition embraces celebrity, expert, and consumer testimonials Endorsements  &  Testimonials Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved.
  34. 34. 1.  Endorsements can be made explicitly or implicitly by words, demonstrations, signatures, likenesses, or any other identifying characteristic of the endorser 2.  Regardless of the manner of the endorsement, advertiser must have substantiation for the: n validity of the endorsement n validity of the underlying claim being endorsed. Substantiation   Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved.
  35. 35. 1.  Endorser MUST be real person 2.  Clearly & conspicuously disclosed 3.  Accurately reflects endorser’s belief/experience at all times 4.  Endorser must have reasonable basis for claims 5.  Claim that endorser uses product must be true at all times 6.  Advertisers need not disclose that a celebrity or expert was paid UNLESS the existence of the relationship is not reasonably expected by the audience and such discovery might materially affect the weight or credibility of claim  Key  Endorsement  Requirements   Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved.
  36. 36. ¨  Customer Identification. Advertisers use consumer testimonials to gain customer trust because customers identify with endorsers. ¨  No Expertise Required. Testimonials are largely anecdotal and subjective evidence as to the quality of a product/service. ¨  Additional Requirements Needed. Generalizing anecdotal experiences may be deceptive if the selected customers’ experience is atypical.    Testimonials   Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved.
  37. 37. ¨  Advertiser must have reasonable basis and proof that ¤  endorser uses product ¤  endorser’s claim reflects their claimed experience ¤  endorser’s claim is typical of what other consumers can reasonably expect ¨  “Results Not Typical” NOT acceptable language ¨  As with other forms of endorsement, any atypical relationship between the advertiser and endorser must be disclosed ¨  Advertisers may use actors so long as it is clearly and conspicuously disclosed in the advertisements that the actors are not actual consumers Testimonials:  Additional  Requirements Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved.
  38. 38. 1.  Read and understand the Guidelines 2.  Endorsements can be made by words or deeds 3.  Don’t ask your employees to advertise for you 4.  Don’t hide disclosures 5.  Compensation is not just money 6.  Endorsements must reflect the truthful experience of the endorser 7.  Don’t make claims that require proof you don’t have 8.  Clearly disclose any material connection between the endorser and advertiser Take  Aways   Copyright 2015 Francine D. Ward All Rights Reserved.
  39. 39. Francine  D.  Ward,  Esq.     Business & Intellectual Property Attorney Trademarks | Copyrights | Book Contracts | Social Media Law  Helping small business entrepreneurs protect what’s theirs—their valuable products, content, brand, and business structure www.fwardattorney.com www.twitter.com/francineward www.facebook.com/francineward   info@fwarda.orney.com       40 THANK  YOU!   Copyright  2015  Francine  D.  Ward.              All  Rights   Reserved.  

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