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MyData2018 - Making Responsible Technology the New normal

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A talk for the Debating Rights and Responsibilities session, in the Our Data track, for MyData in August 2018 in Helsinki.

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MyData2018 - Making Responsible Technology the New normal

  1. 1. doteveryone.org.uk @doteveryoneuk
  2. 2. Making Responsible Technology the New Normal
  3. 3. Many felt the internet had improved their lives
  4. 4. people are less convinced it has been beneficial for society as a whole.
  5. 5. The future Now is the time for Responsible Technology
  6. 6. Poor security, safety, and resilience of internet products and services https://cronkitenews.azpbs.org/2018/04/16/medical-device-hackers/
  7. 7. Unequal vulnerabilities to fraud, surveillance, and inequalities around pricing and access https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/pranavdixit/big-tech-apps-for-the-next-billion-underperform
  8. 8. The impact of algorithms and AI on our lives https://www.propublica.org/article/machine-bias-risk-assessments-in-criminal-sentencing
  9. 9. Agency around personal information
  10. 10. a time for responsibility in technology
  11. 11. Doteveryone is a think tank established to champion responsible technology for the good of everyone in society.
  12. 12. • We want to see responsible creation and operation of technologies in practice • We take a systems perspective, looking at technology products, services and systems and how they fit with people and society • We care about people
  13. 13. making the tech industry more responsible
  14. 14. Responsible Technology considers the social impact it might create and the unintended consequences it can cause.
  15. 15. Business models, ownership and control The business model, and the ownership and control of the organisation, and the product or service, are responsible and appropriate Employment and working conditions Inclusive employment, fair pay and conditions, including at suppliers Reward for contributions Fair reward to all those contributing information or other effort Societal impact The impact of the tech on public/societal value is positive or neutral Unintended consequences There has been consideration of systems effects, side effects, potential harms and unintended consequences Maintenance, service and support Consideration of maintenance, service and support over the long term Understandability People can easily find out and understand how the product/service works Standards and best practice Relevant tech standards and best practices, and systems design are used and evident Usability If a broad range of users are expected, or if some users may be compelled to use the product or service, it should be accessible and have appropriate support Context and Environment The context of the system, product or service has been considered and addressed appropriately; including sustainability considerations
  16. 16. Business models, ownership and control The business model, and the ownership and control of the organisation, and the product or service, are responsible and appropriate Employment and working conditions Inclusive employment, fair pay and conditions, including at suppliers Reward for contributions Fair reward to all those contributing information or other effort Societal impact The impact of the tech on public/societal value is positive or neutral Unintended consequences There has been consideration of systems effects, side effects, potential harms and unintended consequences Maintenance, service and support Consideration of maintenance, service and support over the long term Understandability People can easily find out and understand how the product/service works Standards and best practice Relevant tech standards and best practices, and systems design are used and evident Usability If a broad range of users are expected, or if some users may be compelled to use the product or service, it should be accessible and have appropriate support Context and Environment The context of the system, product or service has been considered and addressed appropriately; including sustainability considerations
  17. 17. Business models, ownership and control The business model, and the ownership and control of the organisation, and the product or service, are responsible and appropriate Employment and working conditions Inclusive employment, fair pay and conditions, including at suppliers Reward for contributions Fair reward to all those contributing information or other effort Societal impact The impact of the tech on public/societal value is positive or neutral Unintended consequences There has been consideration of systems effects, side effects, potential harms and unintended consequences Maintenance, service and support Consideration of maintenance, service and support over the long term Understandability People can easily find out and understand how the product/service works Standards and best practice Relevant tech standards and best practices, and systems design are used and evident Usability If a broad range of users are expected, or if some users may be compelled to use the product or service, it should be accessible and have appropriate support Context and Environment The context of the system, product or service has been considered and addressed appropriately; including sustainability considerations
  18. 18. What is a trust mark system? 1. a system to assess digital products and services against standards 2. a way for consumers to identify responsibly produced digital products and services
  19. 19. – Onora O’Neill “Those who want others’ trust have to do two things. First, they have to be trustworthy, which requires competence, honesty and reliability. Second, they have to provide intelligible evidence that they are trustworthy, enabling others to judge intelligently where they should place or refuse their trust.”
  20. 20. • a voluntary scheme • a mark or indicator of some sort • backed by an open evidence base • values-based criteria • business and technical aspects Trustworthy tech mark concept
  21. 21. • a voluntary scheme • a mark or indicator of some sort • backed by an open evidence base • values-based criteria • business and technical aspects Trustworthy tech mark concept
  22. 22. Prototyping a Trustworthy Tech System
  23. 23. • consumer purchasing pressure is a limited lever for change at present • many trust mark / label projects have failed or had little impact • developing a full trust mark system is a multi-year investment (standards, audit, consumer brand)
  24. 24. refining the responsible technology model and creating tools for business
  25. 25. understand and respect the different contexts and communities the technology operates within anticipate potential unintended consequences of technology examine value systems holistically; be transparent around contributions of value made and received
  26. 26. understand and respect the different contexts and communities the technology operates within anticipate potential unintended consequences of technology examine value systems holistically; be transparent around contributions of value made and received
  27. 27. understand and respect the different contexts and communities the technology operates within anticipate potential unintended consequences of technology examine value systems holistically; be transparent around contributions of value made and received
  28. 28. understand and respect the different contexts and communities the technology operates within anticipate potential unintended consequences of technology examine value systems holistically; be transparent around contributions of value made and received
  29. 29. understand and respect the different contexts and communities the technology operates within anticipate potential unintended consequences of technology examine value systems holistically; be transparent around contributions of value made and received
  30. 30. creating practical tools to embed in the consumer tech development cycle to encourage responsible development
  31. 31. Summary
  32. 32. there are no free lunches
  33. 33. there are no free lunches but people are starting to be seek out responsible products
  34. 34. whose ethics, anyway?
  35. 35. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Trolley_problem.png CC-BY-SA McGedddon ethics? argh!
  36. 36. move a bit slower and think about things https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/06/15/taplock_broken_screwdriver/
  37. 37. We can engineer trustworthy digital products, services and systems, which are competently made, reliable, and honest about what they do and how they do it.
  38. 38. doteveryone.org.uk @doteveryoneuk
  39. 39. “Responsible technology is no longer a nice thing to do to look good, it’s becoming a fundamental pillar of corporate business models. In a post-Cambridge Analytica world, consumers are demanding better technology and more transparency. Companies that do create those services are the ones that will have a better, brighter future.” Kriti Sharma, VP of AI at Sage
  40. 40. @doteveryoneuk Key resources: bit.ly/ResponsibleTechLinks doteveryone.org.uk

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