2010
No Name
Sena
19/10/2010
Technology Dictionary
2
@ : In the e-mail, is the symbol that separates the user name the name
of your email provider.
Acrobat Reader: Adobe pro...
3
Backdoor: (or trapdoor, hatch or trap door) Section hidden a
computer program that is operated only if there are particu...
4
Cable: Conduit connecting network devices
together. The cable type used depends on
the network size and topology of it.
...
5
Database: A collection of data organized in a manner that is easy to
access, manage and update.
Desktop: Is the backgrou...
6
Ethernet: A common method of networking computers in a Local
Area Network (LAN). Ethernet can handle from 10,000,000-
10...
7
Fast Ethernet: A new Ethernet standard that provides speeds of 100
Megabits per second (as opposed to 10 megabits per se...
8
Gateway: A device used to connect different types of operating
environments .Typically used to connect LANs to minicompu...
9
Handheld: PC small enough to be held in the hand or
placed in a pocket. In some you can enter
handwritten data. Bring ot...
10
Icon: Symbols or illustrations on the desktop or computer screen that
indicate program files, documents, or other funct...
11
JPG or JPEG An efficient method for storing graphic files for
transmission across phone lines. UnlikeGIF files, JPG fil...
12
Kernel: the core or essential part of an operating system. It provides
the basic services of the rest system.
Keyword: ...
13
LAN: Local Area Network. A computer network limited to the
immediate area, usually the same building.
LAN Manager: Netw...
14
Macro viruses: is a widespread virus that mainly affects Word
documents. It's more annoying
than destructive. Yesterday...
15
Nanosecond: a billionth of a second. It is a common measure of
access time to RAM.
Network: A group of connected comput...
16
Online: State in which a computer is when connected directly to the
network through a device such as a modem.
Operating...
17
Package (packet): Part of a message being transmitted over a
network. Before being sent over the Internet, information ...
18
QBE: Query By Example .A search method for databases in which the
user fills out the form by following the examples giv...
19
RAM memory: Random Access Memory .Readable
and writeable memory that acts as a storage area
while the computer is on, a...
20
Scandisk: Windows program to check a disk, detects and corrects
errors.
SDRAM memory: very fast, high capacity, for ser...
21
businesses it integrates new technology into their existing structure. The
technology being integrated includes: supply...
22
TCP/IP: Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The
programming protocols invented by individuals in the U.S. ...
23
UNIX: A multi-user operating system that was used
to create most of the programs and protocols that
built the Internet....
24
VGA: Virtual Graphics Array. This standard video graphics
adapter was created by IBM and has been since
improved in Sup...
25
WAIS: Wide Area Information Server. A software system intended to
search large database servers on the Web, and then ra...
26
Xcode: is a suite of tools for developing software on Mac OS X,
developed by Apple. Xcode 3.2, the latest
major version...
27
Zip: compression format file.
Zip drive: removable media for data storage. Originally each zip disk
could hold up to 10...
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Diccionario de ingles español2 (reparado)

  1. 1. 2010 No Name Sena 19/10/2010 Technology Dictionary
  2. 2. 2 @ : In the e-mail, is the symbol that separates the user name the name of your email provider. Acrobat Reader: Adobe program to capture and view documents in their original appearance. Works with Acrobat PDF files. ActiveX: Technology created by Microsoft that provides a programming environment to allow interaction and customization of Web sites. ADSL: Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line. Technology for transmitting of digital information at high bandwidths .Unlike the dial up service, ADSL provides a permanent connection and high speed. This technology uses most of the channel to send information to the user, and only a small part to receive information from the user. Agent: Short program "smart" created to perform certain tasks, providing the user operative. Well known examples of agent are Assistants (wizards) that exist in most modern software. AGP: graphics accelerator port. Lets run fast three-dimensional graphics files. Algorithm: A set of well-defined rules for solving a problem. A software program is the transcript programming language, an algorithm. Antivirus: programs that searches for and virus and eliminate computer viruses that may have infected a hard disk or floppy disk. Application A software program that lets you complete a task, such as writing a paper, creating a poster, designing an image, or viewing a Web page. Archie: A tool that lets you locate files on internet, it was created in Montreal. An Archie server (there are several scattered throughout the Internet) maintains a database that records the location of several thousand files. ASCII : American Standard Code for Information Interchange. This international standard contains 128 codes that correspond to all upper and lower-case Latin characters, numbers, and punctuation marks. Each code is represented by a seven-digit binary number: 0000000 through 111111. ATM: (Asynchronous Transfer Mode): is a switching technology and high-speed multiplexing, used to transmit different types of traffic simultaneously, including voice, video and data. Attachment: This name is given to a data file (for example a spreadsheet or a letter word processor) sent with an email. Authoring (author): Activity to create content for Web Pages in HTML format. The Web site administrator or Webmaster is generally responsible for content authoring. Avatar: fictitious identity, a physical representation (face and body) of a person connected in the virtual world of the Internet. Many people build their digital personality then used in certain servers (for example chat rooms) to play or chat. AVI: Microsoft format for audio and video files.
  3. 3. 3 Backdoor: (or trapdoor, hatch or trap door) Section hidden a computer program that is operated only if there are particular conditions or circumstances in the program. Back-end processor: the processor that is used for certain highly specialized function, such as managing a database. Backup: is a security copy .Used to prevent possible loss of information. Bandwidth: The amount of information that one can send through a connection, measures in bits-per-second (Bps). A standard page of English text contains about 16,000 bits. Banner: ads that occupies part of a Web page, usually located at the top center. By clicking on it, the navigator can reach the advertiser's site. BCC: Blind Courtesy Copy or Blind Carbon Copy. A way to send an e- mail message to more than one recipient, without the parties knowing that an identical message was sent to others .Using the BCC is a good way to avoid the long list of recipients that your correspondents usually have to wade through in the header of a mass-mailing. See CC. BIOS: Basic Input / Output System: Basic system input / output data. Set of procedures to control the flow of data between operational the system and devices such as hard disk, video card, keyboard, mouse and printer. Bit: Binary DigIT .A single digit number in base-2 (either a one or a zero). This is the smallest unit of computerized data. Browser: The software application that allows you to view Internet pages. Browser-safe colors: Although there are millions of colors, in the computer world, there are only 216 colors that are browser-safe, or are able to be read by any Web browser. These colors will remain true no matter what platform or browser you use, and their hexadecimal codes (numerical names for colors) are made up by using any combination of 00 33 66 99 CC or FF. Buffer: Buffer memory area used to store data temporarily during a work session. Bug: Bug insect .Programming error that causes problems in the operations of a computer. Bus: common bond, common conductor, via interconnection .Method of interconnection of devices using a single shared line. In Bus topology each node is connected to a common wire Does not require a hub in a network with bus topology. Byte: A set of 8 bits that means something to the computer, like a letter, number, or punctuation mark. For example, the byte 01001000 signifies the character H .The three-letter word that requires 3 bytes.
  4. 4. 4 Cable: Conduit connecting network devices together. The cable type used depends on the network size and topology of it. Cache memory: small amount of fast memory that increases performance computer store data temporarily. CAD: Computer Aided Design Software for creating precision drawings, two and three dimensional .It is used primarily by architects and engineers. Character: Number, letter or symbol on the computer, consisting of a byte. CD-ROM: Compact Disc read-only. It has a storage capacity of up to 650 megabytes, much greater than the diskette. Celeron: Intel's microprocessor family, economy version of the Pentium with little internal cache. Chat: chat .Internet service that allows two or more users to chat online using the keyboard. Chip: Circuit very small, consisting of thousands to millions of transistors printed on a silicon wafer. Cluster: group, cluster, and clustering. In computer technology, a cluster is the unit of storage on the hard disk. A file is composed of several clusters, which can be stored in various places on disk. Command: a user instruction given to the computer operating system to perform a certain task. Cookie: small text file that a website places on the hard drive of a computer visits. At the same time, collects information about the user .It Accelerates site of navigation. Their use is controversial because it threatens the privacy of users. CC: Courtesy Copy, derived from the non-digital Carbon Copy .A way to send an e-mail message to a person other than the main recipient or recipients. The CC'ed party can see that they are not the main recipient of the letter. client /server: A term denoting the technology relationship between two types of computers, the client (normally your Mac or PC) and the server (a computer that stores and delivers information or files to you). When surfing the Internet, you are the client, and the pages you are reading come from the server. Control key (CTRL): A key used to access commands through the keyboard rather than the menus. CTRL commands are commonly shortcuts. Control panel: A window you can open to adjust various aspects of your computer, such as the volume, fonts, desktop background, mouse speed, and clock. CPU : Central Processing Unit. The CPU is the hardware that most people consider the "brain" of the computer. It takes instructions from software, makes calculations, and helps run the show! Ethernet cable
  5. 5. 5 Database: A collection of data organized in a manner that is easy to access, manage and update. Desktop: Is the background behind all your windows, menus, and dialog boxes: your virtual desk. You can change the look of your desktop by applying different properties to it through your control panel. Domain name: The unique address name for an Internet site. The part on the left is the most specific, and the part on the right is the most general. Each domain name is associated with one and only one Internet Protocol Number, which is translated by a Domain Name System (DNS). Download: To save a file onto your computer from another source, like the Internet. People often download files, such as free-ware, share- ware, for installations, and sounds, movie clips, text files, or news streams onto their computer for viewing or listening. DNS: (Domain Name System). This is a service that stores, translates, and retrieves the numerical address equivalents of familiar host names that you use everyday (such as the "www.4teachers.org" in http://www.4teachers.org). Each host name corresponds to a numerical address required by standard Internet protocol that the DNS retrieves in order to allow you to remember addresses with names, not numbers. DNS entries are housed on numerous servers worldwide. Debugging: error correction or bugs. Diode: Electronic component that allows the passage of electric current in one direction. DSL (Digital Subscriber Line): Technology that lets you send a lot of information at high speed telephone lines. DVD (Digital Versatile Disc): A disc that has large storage capacity and also serves to store movies. Dynamic HTML: variant of HTML (Hyper TextMark-up Language) to create web pages more animated.
  6. 6. 6 Ethernet: A common method of networking computers in a Local Area Network (LAN). Ethernet can handle from 10,000,000- 100,000,000 bits-per-second (or 10-100 megabits-per-second) and can be used with almost any kind of computer. E-mail: is a method of digital Exchanging messages across the Internet or Other computer networks. Originally, Directly Transmitted WAS email from one user to another computer. This required to Be Both computers online at the Same time, the instant messenger. Are Today's email systems based on a store-and-forward model. Email servers accept, forward, deliver and store messages. Users No Longer Need to Be Online Simultaneously connect and Need only Briefly, Typically to an email server, for as long as it Takes to send or Receive messages. Emulation: The process of reconciliation between computers using software. Encrypt: protect file content expressing a coded language. Simple coded languages consist, for example, in replacing letters with numbers. Extranet: part of an intranet access available to customers and other users outside the company.
  7. 7. 7 Fast Ethernet: A new Ethernet standard that provides speeds of 100 Megabits per second (as opposed to 10 megabits per second Ethernet network). FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface): This is a network of 100 Megabits per second in star or ring topology is widely used in backbones, now displaced by new technologies such as ATM. Firewall: Special software used to prevent unauthorized user access to the network. All network traffic must first pass through the firewall computer. FAQ: Frequently-asked questions (and answers) on the theme of a website. Finder: The Finder is the default open application on a Macintosh, and it's represented by a little, purple, happy face icon in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Most people think of it as the desktop, however, or as the utility that lets you navigate quickly among open programs. When you click on the Finder, you can designate which of your open applications will be the active one. Flash Memory: A type of memory that can be erased and reprogrammed in units of memory called "Blocks". Its name comes from the microchip to erase portions of memory in a single action, or "flash." It is used in cell phones, digital cameras and other devices. Floppy disk: is a data storage medium that is composed of a disk of thin, flexible ("floppy") magnetic storage medium encased in a square or rectangular plastic shell. FTP: File Transfer Protocol. A set of rules that allows two computers to "talk" to one another while transferring files from one to another. This is the protocol used when you transfer a file from one computer to another across the Internet. Many Internet sites have publicly accessible repositories of information that can be obtained using FTP, by logging in using the account name "anonymous." These sites are called "anonymous ftp servers."
  8. 8. 8 Gateway: A device used to connect different types of operating environments .Typically used to connect LANs to minicomputers or mainframes. Giga: prefix indicating a multiple of 1,000 million, or 109. When using the binary system, as in computing, means a multiple of 230, or 1,073,741,824. Gigabit: Approximately 1,000 million bits (exactly 1,073,741,824 bits) Gigabyte (GB): a unit of memory. 1 gigabyte = 1024 megabytes = 1,073,741,824 bytes. GIF: Graphics Interchange Format. An efficient method of storing graphics developed for CompuServe in the early 1980s. GIF files take up a small amount of disk space and can be transmitted quickly over phone lines. GIFs can be viewed on any computer platform and are best for illustrations, cartoons, logos, or similar non-photographic graphics.
  9. 9. 9 Handheld: PC small enough to be held in the hand or placed in a pocket. In some you can enter handwritten data. Bring other small keyboards built. Hardware: all the physical components of the computer and its peripherals. Hard disk: It is a non-volatile storage device for digital data. It features one or more rotating rigid platters on a motor- driven spindle within a metal case. Data is encoded magnetically by read/write heads that float on a cushion of air above the platters. Hard drive: A device for storing information in a fixed location within your computer. The equivalent of a filing cabinet in an office, the hard drive is used for storing programs and documents that are not being used. Hexadecimal code: Also called Hex codes. In HTML, colors are identified by a six-character string of numbers and letters (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,A,B,C,D,E,F) derived from base-16 mathematics. The codes are used to convert RGB (red, red, and red) values into something HTML can understand. Pure red would be #FF0000. Homepage: The page on the Internet which most often gives users access to the rest of the Web site. A site is a collection of pages. Host: The name given to any computer directly connected to the Internet. Host computers are usually associated with running computer networks, online services, or bulletin board systems. A host computer on the Internet could be anything from a mainframe to a personal computer. See also DNS. Hosting: Service offered by some providers that offer their clients (individuals or companies) on your server space to host a website. HTML: Hypertext Markup Language. This is the coding language used to create sites on the World Wide Web. HTTP: Hypertext Transfer Protocol. Is a protocol that allows transfer of information in text files, graphics, video, audio and other multimedia resources. Hub: Concentrator. Device is typically used in star topology as the focal point of a network where hence where all the links of various network devices. Hypertext: Generally any text in a file that contains words, phrases, or graphics that, when clicked, cause another document to be retrieved and displayed. Hypertext most often appears blue and underlined in Web pages. Hyperlink: or link, is a reference to a document that the reader can directly follow, or that is followed automatically
  10. 10. 10 Icon: Symbols or illustrations on the desktop or computer screen that indicate program files, documents, or other functions. IP Number: Internet Protocol number .A unique number consisting of four parts separated by dots, for example 129.237.247.243. This is the number assigned to a host machine which is retrieved by a DNS when a request for an Internet site is made. These numbers usually correspond to unique domain names, which are easier for people to remember. Inbox: Inbox for email. Intranet: Intranets are corporate networks that use Internet protocols and tools. Its appearance is similar to Internet pages. If this network is in turn connected to the Internet, it is usually protected by firewalls. Inkjet printer: printer works by spraying ink on paper. Interface: transition element or connection that facilitates the exchange of data. The keyboard, for example, is an interface between the user and the computer. IP: Internet Protocol. IRDA (Infrared Data Association): Organization founded to create international standards for hardware and software used in communication links, infrared. The infrared technology plays an important role in wireless communications. ISDN: Integrated Services Digital Network: Integrated Services Digital Network: telephone transmission system to digital. With an ISDN line and ISDN unadaptador can surf the Web at speeds of 128 kbps, provided that the ISP also has ISDN. ISO: International Organization for Standardization. Founded in 1946, is an international federation to unify standards in a hundred countries. One is the standard OSI reference model universal communication protocols. ISP: Internet Service Provider.
  11. 11. 11 JPG or JPEG An efficient method for storing graphic files for transmission across phone lines. UnlikeGIF files, JPG files lose a little data when the image is converted, and their files are often much larger than GIFs. However, JPGs are your best choice for photographic images.
  12. 12. 12 Kernel: the core or essential part of an operating system. It provides the basic services of the rest system. Keyword: keyword for any search. Kilobit: 1,024 bits. Keyboard shortcuts, a combination of keystrokes that provides easier access to a command or operation file. Keyboard: is typewriter keyboard, which uses an arrangement of buttons or keys, to act as mechanical levers or electronic switches. After punch cards and paper tape, interaction via teletype-style keyboards became the main input device for computers. Kilobyte (KB): A thousand bytes. Due to the binary nature of computers, it's 210 bytes, technically 1024 bytes.
  13. 13. 13 LAN: Local Area Network. A computer network limited to the immediate area, usually the same building. LAN Manager: Network Operating System. Laser printer: fast printer, high resolution using laser technology. When the beam touches the paper, forms a electrostatic image that attracts the ink dry. Latency: time it takes for a packet of information to travel from source to destination.The latency and bandwidth, together, define the capacity and speed of a network. LCD: Liquid Crystal Display. LCD screen, usually used in notebooks and other small computers. Linux: free operating system for personal computers derived from UNIX. It was created by programmer Linus Torvalds, who gave Linux its name. Linux is under special copyright that allows anyone to improve it, but no one to profit from it. Listserv: A very common program used to run a mailing list. Because it is so common, mailing lists are often called listservs, even if they are run with different software. LPT: Line Printer Terminal .Connection between a PC and a printer or other device. Is a parallel port is faster than a serial port.
  14. 14. 14 Macro viruses: is a widespread virus that mainly affects Word documents. It's more annoying than destructive. Yesterday, for example, that the program commands or enters unfamiliar words or phrases that the user has not written. Mainframe: main structure .Computer type large multiuser, used in companies. Majordomo: small program that automatically distributes e-mail messages to users subscribed to a mailing list. Megabit: Approximately 1 million bits. (1,048,576 bits). Megabyte (MB): a unit of memory. 1 megabyte = 1024 kilobytes = 1,048,576 bytes. Megahertz (MHz): One million hertz or Hz. Microprocessor: is the most important chip in a computer. Its speed is measured in MHz. Millisecond: One thousandth of a second. Mirror site: Website copied to another server in order to facilitate access to its contents from the nearest or most convenient for the user. MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prestigious American institution based in Boston. Many consider it the best universidadtécnica the world. MMX: Pentium microprocessor designed to provide multimedia applications faster. Modem: modulator / demodulator. Peripheral device that connects your computer to the phone line. Mailing list: A system that allows people to send e-mail to one address, which is then copied and sent to all of the other subscribers to the mail list. In this way, people who may be using different kinds of e-mail access can participate in discussions together. Menu bar: A horizontal strip at the top of a window that shows the menus available in a program. Motherboard: A computer's main circuit board, containing the CPU, microprocessor support chips, RAM, and expansion (bus) slots. Also it is known as the logic board. MPEG: The Moving Pictures Expert Group develops standards for digital video and audio compression. It is sponsored by the ISO.
  15. 15. 15 Nanosecond: a billionth of a second. It is a common measure of access time to RAM. Network: A group of connected computers that allows people to share information and equipment. Many schools have a Local Area Network and are also connected to a Wide Area Network, such as the World Wide Web. Computer network is a data communications system that interconnects computer systems situated in different places. It can be composed of different combinations of different types of networks. Network Interface Card: Adapter Cards computers located within that specify the type of network to use (Ethernet, FDDI, ATM) and through them are the connecting link between the computer and the network. That is, network cables are connected to the computer. Network Operating System: An operating system that includes programs to communicate with other computers over a network and share resources. Newsgroup: Usenet newsgroups are Internet discussion groups whose topics are about as diverse as you can imagine. If you have an original idea for a newsgroup, and gather some people who want to subscribe, you can probably begin a newsgroup. Node: A network device, usually a computer or printer.
  16. 16. 16 Online: State in which a computer is when connected directly to the network through a device such as a modem. Operating system (OS): This is the programming that makes your computer run its most basic functions. Some examples are UNIX, Linux, Windows 95, 98, or NT, and Mac OS 7 and 8.5. Optical Fiber: technology to transmit information as pulses of light through a glass fiber duct. Optical fiber carries much more information than conventional copper wire. Most long-haul telephone companies use optical fiber. OSI: (Open Systems Interconnect) universal standard for communication protocols. Optical Fiber.
  17. 17. 17 Package (packet): Part of a message being transmitted over a network. Before being sent over the Internet, information is divided into packets. Parallel Port : connection through which data is sent through various channels. A computer usually has a parallel port called LPT1. PCMCIA: Personal Computer Memory Card International Association. Memory expansion cards that increase storage capacity. Peripheral: any device that connects to the computer. For example: keyboard, monitor, mouse, printer, scanner, etc. Personal computer (PC): A microcomputer with its own processor and hard drive. Although technically this refers to all such computers, including Macs, the term PC is nearly synonymous with only the IBM-compatible microcomputers. PING Packet Internet Gopher. A TCP/IP application that sends a message to another computer, waits for a reply, and displays the time the transmission took. This serves to identify what computers are available on the Internet and how long wait-times are. Pixel: A combination of "picture" and "element” .Minimum graphic element with which images are composed on a computer screen. Plain text: This is text without extraneous codes that designate font size, font style, et cetera. See ASCII. Plate: card inserted into a slot on the motherboard to expand the capacity of a computer. Player: A program that lets you listen to audio files. Plug-in: A small piece of software that adds features to already existing, usually large, programs. Plug & play: it means "plug and play." Immediate recognition of a device by the computer, without user input. PoP: Point of Presence .Internet access point. POP3: This is a standard protocol for receiving e-mail. Printer: peripheral that reproduces text and images on paper. The main types are: dot matrix, inkjet and laser. Artificial Intelligence: simulation of human intelligence processes by means of computer systems. Programming language: writing system for the precise description of algorithms or programs computer. Protocol: A set of formal rules describing how data are transmitted, especially through the network. The low-level protocols define electrical and physical standards to be observed, while higher-level protocols defining it. Pulldown menu: A list of options that "pulls down" when you select a menu at the top of a window. For example, the File menu in most programs it is a pulldown menu that reveals commands such as open, new, and save.
  18. 18. 18 QBE: Query By Example .A search method for databases in which the user fills out the form by following the examples given.
  19. 19. 19 RAM memory: Random Access Memory .Readable and writeable memory that acts as a storage area while the computer is on, and is erased every time the computer is turned off. This memory stores data and helps execute programs while in use. Repeater: A device that enhances the network signals. Repeaters are used when the total length of network cables is longer than the maximum allowed by the type of cable .Not all cases can be used. Rebut: reload the operating system a computer is halted. " Resolution: maximum number of pixels to be viewed on a screen. Two examples: 800 x 600 and 640 x 480. / In a printer, the resolution is the quality of the reproduced image and is measured in dpi. ROM memory: Read Only Memory .Readable memory that cannot be corrupted by accidental erasure. ROM retains its data when the computer is turned off. Router: System consisting of hardware and software for Internet data transmission. The sender and receiver must use the same protocol.
  20. 20. 20 Scandisk: Windows program to check a disk, detects and corrects errors. SDRAM memory: very fast, high capacity, for servers and workstations. Search engine: Any of a number of giant databases on the Internet which store data on Web sites and their corresponding URLs. Some popular search engines are Google, Yahoo!, and MSN. Semiconductor: so called insulating substances, such as germanium and silicon, which become conductive by the addition of certain impurities. Semiconductors have great importance in electronics. Serial: A method for transmitting data sequentially, ie, bit by bit. Serial port: connection through which data is sent through a single duct. For example, the mouse connects to a serial port. The computers have two serial ports: COM1 and COM2. Server: A computer or software package that provides a specific service to client software running on other computers. The term can refer to a particular piece of software, such as a WWW server, or to the machine on which the software is running, hence the popular phrase: "The server's down." Shareware: Software distributed on a trial. After some time of use (usually 30 days) the user has the option to buy. Shortcut: a file that contains only the location of another file in the computer. Slot: slot on the motherboard that allows you to expand the capacity of a computer by inserting plates. SMS: Short Message Service .Messaging service for mobile phones .Sends a message to a cell phone up to 160 characters. This service was initially authorized in Europe. There are several websites from which you can send a "sms". SMTP: Simple Mail Transfer Protocol. Is a standard protocol for sending e-mail. SNA: System Network Architecture: network architecture for mainframes, developed by IBM. Sniffer: A program that monitors and analyzes network traffic to detect problems or bottlenecks. Its aim is to maintain the efficiency of data traffic. It can also be used illegitimately to capture data on a network. Socket: (medium) power connector, socket, plug. A socket is the endpoint of a connection. It is a method of communication between a client program and a program on a network server. Software: general term used for various types of computer programs used. Solutions integrator: A type of consulting business that helps other
  21. 21. 21 businesses it integrates new technology into their existing structure. The technology being integrated includes: supply-chain management systems, sales-force automation systems, e-commerce, Internet development telecommunications, computer telephony, etc. Sound card: it is which provides sound to a computer. One of the best known is Sound Blaster. Spam: Unsolicited email. It is considered unethical, because the recipient pays for being connected to the Internet. SQL: Structured Query Language. Programming language that s used to retrieve and update the information in a database. It was developed in the 70's by IBM. It has become an ISO and ANSI. SSL: Secure Sockets Layer. Protocol designed by Netscape to provide the company encrypted communications on the Internet. Star Ring Topology: nodes radiate from a hub. The hub is different depending on the technology used Ethernet, FDDI, etc. The biggest advantage of this topology is that if a node fails, the network continues to function. Switch: A network device capable of performing a series of management tasks, including data forwarding. Sysop: Systems operator. It is a person responsible for the operations of a computer system or network. Part of such operations is security checks and routine maintenance.
  22. 22. 22 TCP/IP: Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The programming protocols invented by individuals in the U.S. Department of Defense to carry messages around the Internet. Technology: The application of scientific discoveries to the development and improvement of goods and services that ideally improve the life of humans and their environment. Such goods and services include materials, machinery, and processes that improve production or solve problems. In schools, technology ranges from pencils, books, and furniture to lighting, transportation, computers, and more. Most common references in schools imply computing or computer-related programs. Token ring: A ring network is a type of LAN with nodes wired ring. Each node passes, always a control message (token) to the next, so that any node has a token can send a message. Topology: The "form" of the network. Three predominant types of technologies: Bus, Star and Ring. Trojan: (Trojan horse, Trojan horse): A program that contains malicious code within data seemingly harmless. It can ruin the hard part.
  23. 23. 23 UNIX: A multi-user operating system that was used to create most of the programs and protocols that built the Internet. URL: Uniform Resource Locators. This is the address of any given site on the Internet. USB: (Universal Serial Bus) interface is a plug & play between a computer and certain devices such as keyboards, telephones, scanners and printers.
  24. 24. 24 VGA: Virtual Graphics Array. This standard video graphics adapter was created by IBM and has been since improved in Super VGA, which generally supports "true color" or 16.8 million colors. Virtual: With regard to memory, virtual refers to temporarily storing information on the hard drive. Virtual memory is controlled automatically by the operating system. Virus: A small program that "infects" a computer, may cause undesirable effects and even irreparable damage. Virus Class: is a virus that affects spreadsheets Microsoft Office. He also called W97M.Class.G. This virus is not hiding. Every time you act adopts a different look. Virus hoaxes: virus hoaxes usually arrive by e-mail.
  25. 25. 25 WAIS: Wide Area Information Server. A software system intended to search large database servers on the Web, and then rank the findings or hits. WAN: Wide Area Network. This network connects several computer so they can share files and sometimes equipment, as well as exchange e-mail. A wide area network connects computers across a large geographic area, such as a city, state, or country. The World Wide Web is a WAN. Wav: extension of a sound file called "wave" created by Microsoft. It has become a standard audio format for PC. It can also be used on Macintosh and other operating systems. Webmail: service offered by some web site to create a free account, e-mail. By e-mail webmail is reviewed with the browser. You can access it from any computer located anywhere. WinZip: Windows program for compressing files. Word processor: The software used to produce documents, such as letters, posters, reports, and syllabi. Common word processors used in schools are MS Works, MS Word, or ClarisWorks. Workstation: Personal computer connected to a LAN. It can be used independently of the mainframe, as it has its own applications and your own hard disk. World Wide Web: the Internet multimedia, which involves the insertion of hypertext and graphics. That is, the resources created in HTML and its derivatives. Is the global information system developed in 1990 by Robert Cailliau and Tim Berners-Lee at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) which was the basis for the explosive popularization of the Internet since 1993. Website: one of the pages that make up a WWW site. A web site covers a set of related pages. A home page is called "home page". Worm: A program that copies itself to fill the entire memory. A virus that normally come through the mail, as attachment. WYSIWYG: What You See Is What You Get. Monitor output that closely resembles the printed output. Most software now offers WYSIWYG options, like "print preview."
  26. 26. 26 Xcode: is a suite of tools for developing software on Mac OS X, developed by Apple. Xcode 3.2, the latest major version, is bundled free with Mac OS X v10.6, but is not installed by default. Instead it must be installed from the Mac OS X DVD, or downloaded from the Apple website. The version that is currently available is 3.2.4 that comes with iOS SDK 4.1. Because version 3.2 is not supported on older Mac OS versions, more dated versions of Xcode are available free from the Apple Developer Connection website. XModem: A file transfer protocol for modems in which data is sent from the Internet to the PC without acknowledgment from the PC.
  27. 27. 27 Zip: compression format file. Zip drive: removable media for data storage. Originally each zip disk could hold up to 100 MB (megabytes) or the equivalent of 70 floppy disks, the new version of the device can store up to 750 MB. Zipped files Zipped files are files that are compressed and must be "unzipped" to be read. Zipped files download faster because they are smaller than an uncompressed equivalent.

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