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Writing the Speech/News Conference Story - Professor Linda Austin - National Management College - Yangon, Burma

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This presentation helps journalism students organize a speech or news conference story. It was created by Professor Linda Austin to help her introductory reporting and journalism ethics students at the National Management College in Yangon, Burma.

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Writing the Speech/News Conference Story - Professor Linda Austin - National Management College - Yangon, Burma

  1. 1. WRITING THE SPEECH/NEWS CONFERENCE STORY Organize a news story based on a speech or press conference.
  2. 2. WHAT’S THE LEAD? • The lead summarizes the most newsworthy or provocative point the speaker made, usually presented as a paraphrase or partial quote. • The lead is NOT that someone spoke.
  3. 3. SAY-NOTHING LEAD (This is bad) A Mizzima editor delivered a lecture Tuesday at the National Management College.
  4. 4. NOT MUCH BETTER A Mizzima editor delivered a lecture about journalism Tuesday at the National Management College.
  5. 5. YES! A Mizzima editor encouraged journalism students at the National Management College Tuesday to pursue internships now and “never stop learning” once they graduate.
  6. 6. 2d GRAF: SUPPORT IT WITH A QUOTE Theingi Htun, editor-in-charge of the Mizzima Myanmar website, said that the “digital revolution in media will force you as journalists to constantly update your skills.”
  7. 7. 3d GRAF – WHERE AND WHY The third paragraph explains where, when and why the speech was given. What should the 3rd graf for this story say? Theingi Htun spoke in NMC classes at the invitation of Professor Linda Austin to give her students first-hand knowledge of what working as a journalist in Yangon is like.
  8. 8. WHAT’S THE REST OF STORY? Quotes, descriptions, background context and audience reaction to convey the speaker’s message and to characterize how it was received.
  9. 9. A B C B D E F G

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