LinkedIn Basics

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  • Not here to tell you about the mechanics of posting and setting up an account - although we are certainly happy to help you get started We’re here to talk about how you’re going to use these tools to connect with people to enhance what you’re already doing and meet your business goals.
  • Complete your profile – LinkedIn advises that, for profile completeness, members should post a photo, list their education, and at least three entries under professional experience. Write an executive summary – a section of your profile not to be ignored: Not only is this where potential clients can learn about what sets you apart, it’s one of the best places to infuse with pertinent keywords that will help valuable potential contacts to find you. List Groups & Associations – be sure to populate this section where appropriate. List any groups that you are a member of, are on the board of, or simply frequent/associate with. It might because of one of these affiliations that someone decides they want to meet you. Make connections – when inviting people to be a part of your network, make sure they are people you know; that would recognize you immediately. Start with fellow Green Bankers, fellow alumni, and past or current clients/coworkers. Join groups – there are numerous industry groups on LinkedIn that are worthy of your attention, and being a part of these provides an incredibly valuable way to make new contacts, learn about top trends or news in the industry, or share your insights on industry trends with fellow professionals. To find relevant groups, you can conduct a search by industry using the drop-down menu in the top-right of your LinkedIn homepage. Or, LinkedIn will often suggest “ Gr oups You May Like” in the bottom-right-hand corner. Start with 2 or 3, but you are allowed to join as many as 50. Request recommendations – LinkedIn also advises that to complete their profile, members should also collect at least three recommendations from connections in their network. One way to fulfill this requirement could be to ask clients that have had a particularly good experience with Green Bank to comment on it, in the form of a recommendation. Privacy settings – The key to making LinkedIn a go-to business development tool is to ‘b e where people are looking. ’ As an extension of that, it’s important to make sure you’re making yourself easy to find. So check your privacy settings and open them up so that searchers can see your full name, your title and your photo.
  • Make connections – when inviting people to be a part of your network, make sure they are people you know; that would recognize you immediately. Start with fellow Green Bankers, fellow alumni, and past or current clients/coworkers.
  • PERFORM KEYWORD SEARCHES TO FIND GROUPS OF INTEREST TO YOU AND YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE Opportunity to seek out affinity groups and like-minded peers via their discussion groups and contribute to the conversation. See what’s being talked about in industries relevant to your business (UPSTREAM INDUSTRY?) Comment smartly to reflect back on the expertise of you personally and by association, Green Bank Join groups – there are numerous industry groups on LinkedIn that are worthy of your attention, and being a part of these provides an incredibly valuable way to make new contacts, learn about top trends or news in the industry, or share your insights on industry trends with fellow professionals. To find relevant groups, you can conduct a search by industry using the drop-down menu in the top-right of your LinkedIn homepage. Or, LinkedIn will often suggest “ Gr oups You May Like” in the bottom-right-hand corner. Start with 2 or 3, but you are allowed to join as many as 50.
  • Request recommendations – LinkedIn also advises that to complete their profile, members should also collect at least three recommendations from connections in their network. One way to fulfill this requirement could be to ask clients that have had a particularly good experience with Green Bank to comment on it, in the form of a recommendation.
  • Privacy settings – The key to making LinkedIn a go-to business development tool is to ‘b e where people are looking. ’ As an extension of that, it’s important to make sure you’re making yourself easy to find. So check your privacy settings and open them up so that searchers can see your full name, your title and your photo.
  • Participate regularly – Both in the Green Bank discussion group, as well as the other industry groups you’re a part of, you want to make your presence known, if only infrequently. Group members will post questions or discussion topics to start conversations – take part in those discussions! Offer a thoughtful answer to a question, if you have one, or be the one to pose a thought-provoking question. Don’t sell – most members don’t join LinkedIn to be sold to, so even if you’re sitting on the best banking product or rate in town, resist the temptation to make it a cornerstone of your LinkedIn communications (either personal or group posts). Brag (modestly) – However, if you’ve played a role in helping to fund a major project, or helping someone to build their dream home, that’s worth sharing. Mention what an honor it was to work with the company/organization, and how pleased you are with the project’s success. Likewise, if Green Bank has an event coming up that you’re proud of, share the news! Networking – Where appropriate, ask your contacts to introduce you to some of their contacts. Not only will this provide you a warm handshake with someone of interest to you, but it can make your direct contact look good for having made the introduction. Networking goes both ways, of course, and you should expect to be contacted. It is allowed to ignore an invitation, if you do not know the person (or they have not been introduced to you through a known contact). Also, LinkedIn has an event section. You can use this to take your online networking offline . Also, you are welcome to post events (Green Bank or otherwise) that you feel will be useful to your network. Interests – As mentioned above, this is a great place for keywords, as well as for you to share the multi-faceted nature of your personality and strengths. It can be one more reason for a LinkedIn user to want to contact you.
  • BE USEFUL Participate regularly – Both in the Green Bank discussion group, as well as the other industry groups you’re a part of, you want to make your presence known, if only infrequently. Group members will post questions or discussion topics to start conversations – take part in those discussions! Offer a thoughtful answer to a question, if you have one, or be the one to pose a thought-provoking question. Don’t sell – most members don’t join LinkedIn to be sold to, so even if you’re sitting on the best banking product or rate in town, resist the temptation to make it a cornerstone of your LinkedIn communications (either personal or group posts).
  • Brag (modestly) – However, if you’ve played a role in helping to fund a major project, or helping someone to build their dream home, that’s worth sharing. Mention what an honor it was to work with the company/organization, and how pleased you are with the project’s success. Likewise, if Green Bank has an event coming up that you’re proud of, share the news!
  • Networking – Where appropriate, ask your contacts to introduce you to some of their contacts. Not only will this provide you a warm handshake with someone of interest to you, but it can make your direct contact look good for having made the introduction. Networking goes both ways, of course, and you should expect to be contacted. It is allowed to ignore an invitation, if you do not know the person (or they have not been introduced to you through a known contact). Also, LinkedIn has an event section. You can use this to take your online networking offline . Also, you are welcome to post events (Green Bank or otherwise) that you feel will be useful to your network.
  • Interests – As mentioned above, this is a great place for keywords, as well as for you to share the multi-faceted nature of your personality and strengths. It can be one more reason for a LinkedIn user to want to contact you.
  • LinkedIn Basics

    1. 1. LinkedIn & Networking 2.0
    2. 2. What we’re covering today• What is Networking 2.0?• Why LinkedIn?• Optimization• Best Practices• Maintenance
    3. 3. Networking 2.0 is about taking what youalready do, and bringing it online.
    4. 4. Doing what you do best• Network and build relationships• Schedule meetings with clients• Share your expertise• Follow-up and stay connected
    5. 5. Why LinkedIn?
    6. 6. Why LinkedIn?
    7. 7. Why LinkedIn?
    8. 8. Why LinkedIn?• Control the message online - Control what people see when they Google you and your brand by creating a professional profile that ranks high in search• Leverage your expertise - Join discussions and post updates with thoughtful commentary related to your industry• Keep in touch - Follow up with prospective clients, employees, employers in a low-pressure environment
    9. 9. Rules of Engagement1. LinkedIn is a lot like a cocktail party - Connect and converse, don’t start with a sales pitch.
    10. 10. Rules of Engagement2. Everything said online lives forever - Don’t say anything you wouldn’t want your mother (or your employer, or clients) to see.
    11. 11. Rules of Engagement3. Social media engagement is a long-term strategy - Showing you have the resources and commitment to maintain your online presence shows current and potential clients you have the resources and commitment to serve their needs as well.
    12. 12. Getting the most out of your LinkedIn account• Complete your profile• Write an executive summary• List groups and associations• Consider keywords• Make connections• Join discussion groups• Request recommendations• Adjust privacy settings• Tailor your alert preferences
    13. 13. Make connections
    14. 14. Join discussion groups
    15. 15. Request recommendationsPersonalize!
    16. 16. Adjust privacy settings
    17. 17. Tailor your alert preferences
    18. 18. Want more? There’s an app for that.
    19. 19. Keeping momentum going without wasting time• Participate regularly• Don’t sell• Brag (modestly)• Network• Add your interests
    20. 20. Participate regularly, but don’t sellScreenshot Credit: Katie Laird
    21. 21. Brag (modestly)
    22. 22. Network
    23. 23. Add your interests
    24. 24. Thank you!Think of more questions later?Email Lauren:LMcKechnie@MMIHouston.com

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