Thoreau

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Thoreau

  1. 1. Walden
  2. 2. Objective <ul><li>We will be examining how Walden represents an attempt to discover the underlying unity between humanity, nature, and God. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Notes <ul><li>Thoreau reflects the view that nature is animated by a single, unifying spirit. </li></ul>
  4. 4. “Sounds” <ul><li>“ Sounds” deals with the various sounds of nature that excite and uplift Thoreau; they often come upon him by surprise, as was the case with Emerson. </li></ul><ul><li>He believes the truths of life do not manifest themselves in books but rather during seeming idleness when one is experiencing nature and contemplating its details. </li></ul>
  5. 5. “Brute Neighbors” <ul><li>In the battle between the ants, he uses a mock heroic tone to emphasize that their war is just as meaningful--and meaningless--as the wars in which men engage. </li></ul>
  6. 6. “The Pond in Winter” <ul><li>Thoreau’s comparison of ice closing over the pond to marmots closing over the eyelids illustrates the operation of the Over-Soul. </li></ul><ul><li>A principle found in one part of nature is true of all of nature, and the need for rest, for “contemplation,” is a universal truth. </li></ul>
  7. 7. “Spring” <ul><li>The transformation of the cold gray ice into a liquid pond “calm and full of hope” is for Thoreau symbolic of the continued possibility of renewal in human life. </li></ul><ul><li>The songs of the robin and geese are important because they symbolize not only the return of spring but also the perpetual vitality and health of nature. </li></ul>
  8. 8. “Conclusion” <ul><li>Thoreau leaves the woods because he felt he had “several more lives to live.” </li></ul>

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