Artist at Social Power Establisher
Art & Performance Communication - PBRL 3022 - Lecture Three
September 23, 2014
3:30 p.m...
Class Agenda - Lecture 3
A brief slideshow of the images in syllabus
Introduce: *Artistic symbolism is an effective power ...
Let’s look at the following
images and see what we
can share...
Image 1
Who is this?
Who is this?
What is their role?
What could you say about the era
they lived in?
What tells you when ...
Image 2 - Who am I?
Look at my clothes - what do they tell you? What story am I telling?
What is my role? What am I carryi...
Image 3
Who am I?
What is my place in history?
What am I trying to say with my
body language?
What’s the purpose of this p...
What does this mean?
Image 4
Why am I making this face?
What do the colours used in
this portrait say? Why were
they chose...
Image 5 - Who’s the focus?
Look at my gesture and position - what story am I telling? What is my
role? What am I doing?
What is the theme here?
Artist as power establisher - How?
Body Language (stance, look, position of face)
Material possess...
Elizabeth I

•First Tudor Queen
•Unmarried
•Had to establish a powerful image to
retain her throne
•Used what techniques?
...
Roderigo Borgias - Pope
Alexander VI

•Head of “The Original Crime Family”
•Priest with three acknowledged,
illegitimate c...
American Presidents

•They both are American leaders
•Both steered Americans to revolution
(independence and emancipation)...
Power Portraits
What are Power Portraits?
What Semiotics and Symbolism are employed?
Setting: reinforces role, region, per...
What is this?
What do you see?
What are the symbols?
What are the signs?

Image 11
Image 3

Henry the VIII

Image 12
Image 13

Charles the First

Image 14
The proliferation of various subjects
matters but also the status of the artist
designing and executing your portraits.
Ju...
Da Vinci - The Master
A man of many talents:
architect, inventor, author,
theorist and artist
In high demand - prolific
Hi...
Image 16

Image 17
If you had a portrait
commissioned of you What would it look like?
Artists can increase and heighten your image
BUT
they can also detract from your established image
they can also detract f...
Image 18

Image 19
Image 20

Image 4

Image 21
Questions?
Let’s talk about your guest blog post
assignment..!
References:

Finn, J. M. (2012). Visual communication and culture: Images in action. Don Mills, On: Oxford University Pres...
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PBRL 3022 Art & Performance Communication - Lecture 3 Art as societal power establisher

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Artistic symbolism is an effective power tool. The more art you possessed and the higher the status of the artist who created it was a direct symbol of wealth which equated to power throughout the medieval to modern times. Many monarchies, religions, politicians and political parties as well as average citizens have amassed power due to their commission of, acquisition and creation of many artistic pieces. We will discuss the important roles of portraiture as well as the emphasis on the requirement of a “professionally recognized” artist as well as the symbolism used within these portraits to expose the wealth and admirable qualities of its subjects/patrons. We will also discuss the ability of the artist to “rewrite” history through its interpretation of a subject. We will also discuss your blog posts which are due prior to lecture four.

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PBRL 3022 Art & Performance Communication - Lecture 3 Art as societal power establisher

  1. 1. Artist at Social Power Establisher Art & Performance Communication - PBRL 3022 - Lecture Three September 23, 2014 3:30 p.m.- 5:30 p.m. Seton 503, Mount Saint Vincent, Halifax, NS
  2. 2. Class Agenda - Lecture 3 A brief slideshow of the images in syllabus Introduce: *Artistic symbolism is an effective power tool* and *Artists as designers of visual power* Detailed re-examination of a few of the most notable images of the height of portraiture What would yours look like? Discuss the elements of your portrait Discuss the rise of the “power portrait” as well as idea of patronage and the art collection as symbols of status, wealth and power within society Artist as powerful public communicator during the era of power portraits Discuss the history and prominence of Da Vinci We will also discuss the ability of the artist to “rewrite” history Class discussion regarding the blog post assignment
  3. 3. Let’s look at the following images and see what we can share...
  4. 4. Image 1 Who is this? Who is this? What is their role? What could you say about the era they lived in? What tells you when this was painted? What’s the purpose of this portrait?
  5. 5. Image 2 - Who am I? Look at my clothes - what do they tell you? What story am I telling? What is my role? What am I carrying?
  6. 6. Image 3 Who am I? What is my place in history? What am I trying to say with my body language? What’s the purpose of this portrait?
  7. 7. What does this mean? Image 4 Why am I making this face? What do the colours used in this portrait say? Why were they chosen?
  8. 8. Image 5 - Who’s the focus? Look at my gesture and position - what story am I telling? What is my role? What am I doing?
  9. 9. What is the theme here? Artist as power establisher - How? Body Language (stance, look, position of face) Material possessions (crown jewels, expensive clothes Background (lavish furnishings, mythical beauty) Size of the painting (physically imposing, complex content Historical references in the paintings (historical moment in time) Semiotics and Symbolism (What colours are used? What things are added to the portrait which seem odd?)
  10. 10. Elizabeth I •First Tudor Queen •Unmarried •Had to establish a powerful image to retain her throne •Used what techniques? Image 6 Image 7
  11. 11. Roderigo Borgias - Pope Alexander VI •Head of “The Original Crime Family” •Priest with three acknowledged, illegitimate children with a prostitute and many concubines •Killed for the papacy; waged “Holy War” v.s. France Image 1 Image 8
  12. 12. American Presidents •They both are American leaders •Both steered Americans to revolution (independence and emancipation) •What elements are used to exemplify their glory? •What is different in each portrait? Image 9 Image 10
  13. 13. Power Portraits What are Power Portraits? What Semiotics and Symbolism are employed? Setting: reinforces role, region, persona and title Colour: indicates societal wealth, societal role and patron wealth Pose: Profile, 3/4 profile, full body, half body, nature of the stance, body location, size within portrait setting, angle they face others Size: Physical size of the scene/portrait, additional family (hier apparent) Clothing, objects & jewelry: embellishments, material type, colour, style, design, crowns, jewels, swords, staffs, desk, writing materials, books, globes or maps, models, flowers etc. Animals: dogs, horses, cats, birds (specifically the type), bears, lions, snakes, owls, etc.
  14. 14. What is this? What do you see? What are the symbols? What are the signs? Image 11
  15. 15. Image 3 Henry the VIII Image 12
  16. 16. Image 13 Charles the First Image 14
  17. 17. The proliferation of various subjects matters but also the status of the artist designing and executing your portraits. Just like with present day designers - you are wearing is important, who designed your painting mattered.
  18. 18. Da Vinci - The Master A man of many talents: architect, inventor, author, theorist and artist In high demand - prolific High status by all demographics: religious, political, monarchial and received many patronages Image 15
  19. 19. Image 16 Image 17
  20. 20. If you had a portrait commissioned of you What would it look like?
  21. 21. Artists can increase and heighten your image BUT they can also detract from your established image they can also detract from your established image they can also detract from your established image
  22. 22. Image 18 Image 19
  23. 23. Image 20 Image 4 Image 21
  24. 24. Questions?
  25. 25. Let’s talk about your guest blog post assignment..!
  26. 26. References: Finn, J. M. (2012). Visual communication and culture: Images in action. Don Mills, On: Oxford University Press. 16-20.Henry VII: Patron ... or Plunderer? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9ezB_J5Xq8 last accessed: November 17, 2013. •West, S. (2004). Portraiture. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pages 21-41, 43-69, 71-103.King, J. N. (1989). Tudor royal iconography: Literature and art in an age of religious crisis. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press. pages 13-22, 54,64, 118.String, T. C. (2008). Art and communication in the reign of Henry VIII. Aldershot, England: Ashgate.Kings of Spain From the Catholic Monarchs to Juan Carlos I: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAYwu5XQQh0 last accessed: November 17, 2013.The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBlGkTTol9E last accessed: November 17, 2013.History Channel: Henry the VIII: http://www.history.com/topics/henry-viii/videos#henry-viii last accessed: November 17, 2013.History Channel: The Protestant Reformation: http://www.history.com/topics/henry-viii/videos#protestand-reformation-english-reformation last accessed: November 17, 2013.The House of Habsburg: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Habsburg and http://www.traditioninaction.org/OrganicSociety/A_019_HumanTypes.html last accessed: November 17, 2013.Ivan the Terrible - biography: http://www.biography.com/people/ivanthe-terrible-9350679 and video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moltBmPc7Uc last accessed: November 17, 2013.She Wolves - England’s Early Queens: http ://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37Tpbkt2FgU last accessed: November 17, 2013. • Image references: 1. dell’Altissimo, Cristofano. (unknown date). Pope Alexander Vi. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pope_Alexander_Vi.jpg 2. Eworth, Hans. (1569).Elizabeth I and the Three Goddesses. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eworth_Elizabeth_I_and_the_Three_Goddesses_1569.jpg 3. Hans Holbein the Younger. (1536-37). Portrait of Henry VIII. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_Henry_VIII 4. Vasnetsov, Viktor. (1897). Tsar Ivan the Terrible. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vasnetsov_Ioann_4.jpg 5. Carpenter, F.B. (1864). Emancipation proclamation. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Emancipation_proclamation.jpg 6. Artist unknown. (c. 1600). Elizabeth I in Coronation Robes. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elizabeth_I_in_coronation_robes.jpg 7. Gower, George. (1588). Elizabeth I (Armanda Portrait). Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elizabeth_I_%28Armada_Portrait%29.jpg 8. Titian. (1506-1511). Jacopo Pesaro being presented by Pope Alexander VI to Saint Peter. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacopo_Pesaro_being_presented_by_Pope_Alexander_VI_to_Saint_Peter 9. Stuart, Gilbert. (1796). George Washington (Landsdowne Portrait). Retrieved from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gilbert_Stuart,_George_Washington_ %28Lansdowne_portrait,_1796%29.jpg 10. Healy, G.P.A. (1869). Abraham Lincoln. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Abraham_Lincoln_by_George_Peter_Alexander_Healy.jpg 11. Eyck, Jan van. (1434). The Arnolfini Portrait. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Van_Eyck_-_Arnolfini_Portrait.jpg 12.Unknown. (1545). Family of Henry VIII. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Family_of_Henry_VIII_c_1545_detail.jpg 13. Dyke, Anthony van. (1636). Portrait of King Charles I in his robes of state. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:King_Charles_I_after_original_by_van_Dyck.jpg 14. Dyke, Anthony va. (1633). Charles I (1600-49) with M. de St Antoine. Retrieved from: http ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Anthony_van_Dyck_-_Charles_I_%281600-49%29_with_M._de_St_Antoine_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg 15. Melzi, Francesco. (post 1510). Portrait of Leonardo. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Francesco_Melzi_-_Portrait_of_Leonardo_-_WGA14795.jpg 16. da Vinci, Leonardo. (1503-1506). Mona Lisa. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mona_Lisa,_by_Leonardo_da_Vinci,_from_C2RMF_retouched.jpg 17. Melone, Altobello. (1500-1524). Cesare Borgia. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cesareborgia.jpg 18. Unknown. (1520s). Portrait of Richard the III of England. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Richard_III_earliest_surviving_portrait.jpg 19. Unknown. (late 1500s). King Richard III. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:King_Richard_III.jpg 20. Unknown. (1500’s). Ivan the Terrible. Retrieved from: http://www.ssqq.com/travel/images/russia2012x064.jpg 21. Repin, Iiya. (1885). Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16th, 1581. Retrieved from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:REPIN_Ivan_Terrible%26Ivan.jpg

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