Vermont presentation oct 2013 (ln)

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  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Reality of U.S. Healthcare costs – spending more, poorer outcomes and limited access.Higher self-reported wellbeing associated with fewer hospitalizations, ER visits and medications (Population Health Management 2012).30 years of Gallop Polls in 150 countries – sample of 98% of the population. Only 7% are thriving in all of their identified areas (which are univesral across nationalities, faiths and cultures): Love for what we do (Purpose), Relationship, Security of finances, Vibrancy of Physical Health, Pride in what we have contributed to community.
  • Wellbeing is not just another word for physical health—it is about finding balance in body, mind, and spirit. In this state, we feel content, connected, energized, resilient, and safe.Wellbeing is possible even in the midst of chronic or life-threatening illness, with maturing bodies and minds that struggle with dementia. It’s about addressing the whole person where they are and increasing capacity within that person’s limits. Our model of wellbeing was created by Dr. Mary Jo Kreitzer, Director of the Center for Spirituality and Healing, at the University of Minnesota.  In her extensive work and research around integrative health and healing, Dr. Kreitzer identified six dimensions that contribute to wellbeing.These take into account our interconnectedness and interdependence with our friends, families, and communities, as well as the personal and global environment we live in. They also address the importance of security and purpose in our lives. The model can be conceptualized and expressed at many levels—including the individual, family, organization/system, and community.
  • Health is affected by the food we eat, how often we exercise, how we manage our stress, and how much we sleep, as well as social, environmental, and genetic influences. Lifestyle choices are responsible for nearly 90% of health outcomes.Physical Activity: Don’t just sit there—move your body to prevent and reduce the risk of many diseases, improve physical and emotional health, and live a longer life. Note: Matthew Sanford – physical health does not equal wellbeing.Diet:Your food choices have a bigger effect than you think. Nutritious meals and mindful eating can foster your own wellbeing and have a positive impact on your environment and the people around you. Sleep: Don’t underestimate the importance of sleep, which has far-reaching effects on your mood, ability to concentrate, connections to others, and even your weight. Thoughts & Emotions: Learn to recognize how your thoughts and emotions make a difference —in your physical and mental health, relationships, and overall wellbeing—and how to cultivate a more positive outlook.Stress Mastery: Feeling overwhelmed? Learning to recognize your stressors can help you control how you respond to them, leading to a more relaxed, healthier life.
  • Health is affected by the food we eat, how often we exercise, how we manage our stress, and how much we sleep, as well as social, environmental, and genetic influences. Lifestyle choices are responsible for nearly 90% of health outcomes.Physical Activity: Don’t just sit there—move your body to prevent and reduce the risk of many diseases, improve physical and emotional health, and live a longer life. Note: Matthew Sanford – physical health does not equal wellbeing.Diet:Your food choices have a bigger effect than you think. Nutritious meals and mindful eating can foster your own wellbeing and have a positive impact on your environment and the people around you. Sleep: Don’t underestimate the importance of sleep, which has far-reaching effects on your mood, ability to concentrate, connections to others, and even your weight. Thoughts & Emotions: Learn to recognize how your thoughts and emotions make a difference —in your physical and mental health, relationships, and overall wellbeing—and how to cultivate a more positive outlook.Stress Mastery: Feeling overwhelmed? Learning to recognize your stressors can help you control how you respond to them, leading to a more relaxed, healthier life.
  • Purpose guides life decisions, influences behavior, shapes goals, offers a sense of direction, and creates meaning. Purpose is directly related to both health and happiness, and it has a major impact on our wellbeing. Purpose can be different from a job or career and in an older population needs to be redefined. Retirement with no purpose leads to death.Life Purpose: Why do you get up in the morning? Knowing your own answers to this question can help you live a more engaged, fulfilled life.Spirituality: Experiencing a connection to something larger than yourself can offer a sense of meaning in life and provide comfort to help you cope with life’s challenges.
  • Purpose guides life decisions, influences behavior, shapes goals, offers a sense of direction, and creates meaning. Purpose is directly related to both health and happiness, and it has a major impact on our wellbeing. Purpose can be different from a job or career and in an older population needs to be redefined. Retirement with no purpose leads to death.Life Purpose: Why do you get up in the morning? Knowing your own answers to this question can help you live a more engaged, fulfilled life.Spirituality: Experiencing a connection to something larger than yourself can offer a sense of meaning in life and provide comfort to help you cope with life’s challenges.
  • Purpose guides life decisions, influences behavior, shapes goals, offers a sense of direction, and creates meaning. Purpose is directly related to both health and happiness, and it has a major impact on our wellbeing. Purpose can be different from a job or career and in an older population needs to be redefined. Retirement with no purpose leads to death.Life Purpose: Why do you get up in the morning? Knowing your own answers to this question can help you live a more engaged, fulfilled life.Spirituality: Experiencing a connection to something larger than yourself can offer a sense of meaning in life and provide comfort to help you cope with life’s challenges.
  • Purpose guides life decisions, influences behavior, shapes goals, offers a sense of direction, and creates meaning. Purpose is directly related to both health and happiness, and it has a major impact on our wellbeing. Purpose can be different from a job or career and in an older population needs to be redefined. Retirement with no purpose leads to death.Life Purpose: Why do you get up in the morning? Knowing your own answers to this question can help you live a more engaged, fulfilled life.Spirituality: Experiencing a connection to something larger than yourself can offer a sense of meaning in life and provide comfort to help you cope with life’s challenges.
  • Healthy relationships are a vital component of overall health. We humans are social animals and as such, we have an innate need to be involved with other people. Strong family ties and friendships can increase our sense of security and self-esteem and provide a psychological buffer against stress, anxiety, and depression.Health risks of being alone or isolated are compatible with the risks associated with smoking, high blood pressure and obesity.Our larger social networks can also provide a sense of connection where people can share their concerns and support others. We cover these broader social connections in the Community section.
  • Healthy relationships are a vital component of overall health. We humans are social animals and as such, we have an innate need to be involved with other people. Strong family ties and friendships can increase our sense of security and self-esteem and provide a psychological buffer against stress, anxiety, and depression.Health risks of being alone or isolated are compatible with the risks associated with smoking, high blood pressure and obesity.Our larger social networks can also provide a sense of connection where people can share their concerns and support others. We cover these broader social connections in the Community section.
  • So what do we mean by community?   In our wellbeing model, we are talking about societal groups that live in a defined geographical area and share physical and governmental resources. This kind of community exists at different levels, from neighborhoods to towns to states and countries.  Community wellbeing is an interesting concept because it exists in the wellbeing of both:the individuals who make up that communitythe larger “superorganism” of the community (and in the norms and habits that arise within that community)Connection is fostered by a community’s social networks that:Offer social supportEnhance social trustSupport members living harmoniously togetherFoster civic engagementEmpower members to participate in community and democracyA livable community is supported by the infrastructure, including:HousingTransportationEducationParks and recreationHuman servicesPublic safetyAccess to culture and the artsAn equitable community is supported by values of diversity, social justice, and individual empowerment, where:All members are treated with fairness and justiceBasic needs are met (adequate access to health services, decent housing, food, personal security)There is equal opportunity to get education and meet individual potential
  • So what do we mean by community?   In our wellbeing model, we are talking about societal groups that live in a defined geographical area and share physical and governmental resources. This kind of community exists at different levels, from neighborhoods to towns to states and countries.  Community wellbeing is an interesting concept because it exists in the wellbeing of both:the individuals who make up that communitythe larger “superorganism” of the community (and in the norms and habits that arise within that community)Connection is fostered by a community’s social networks that:Offer social supportEnhance social trustSupport members living harmoniously togetherFoster civic engagementEmpower members to participate in community and democracyA livable community is supported by the infrastructure, including:HousingTransportationEducationParks and recreationHuman servicesPublic safetyAccess to culture and the artsAn equitable community is supported by values of diversity, social justice, and individual empowerment, where:All members are treated with fairness and justiceBasic needs are met (adequate access to health services, decent housing, food, personal security)There is equal opportunity to get education and meet individual potential
  • So what do we mean by community?   In our wellbeing model, we are talking about societal groups that live in a defined geographical area and share physical and governmental resources. This kind of community exists at different levels, from neighborhoods to towns to states and countries.  Community wellbeing is an interesting concept because it exists in the wellbeing of both:the individuals who make up that communitythe larger “superorganism” of the community (and in the norms and habits that arise within that community)Connection is fostered by a community’s social networks that:Offer social supportEnhance social trustSupport members living harmoniously togetherFoster civic engagementEmpower members to participate in community and democracyA livable community is supported by the infrastructure, including:HousingTransportationEducationParks and recreationHuman servicesPublic safetyAccess to culture and the artsAn equitable community is supported by values of diversity, social justice, and individual empowerment, where:All members are treated with fairness and justiceBasic needs are met (adequate access to health services, decent housing, food, personal security)There is equal opportunity to get education and meet individual potential
  • Think of the environment as concentric rings starting with your home and workplace and widening out to your neighborhood, your region, the entire planet.  At each level, environmental factors impact human health.  At each level, we impact the environment with our choices and actions. This not only includes the quality of the air and water, but also the quality of our relationship with nature. Personal Environment: Environment free of toxins. The air you breathe, the water you drink, and even the noise levels in your personal spaces all impact your health in an immediate way. Nature and Us: Access to nature – biophilia. In addition to meeting some of our most basic needs, nature relaxes, refreshes, and heals us. In turn, we need to work to heal nature. Global Environment: Almost every choice you make affects the environment on some level. Working to create a sustainable lifestyle benefits the whole planet.
  • Think of the environment as concentric rings starting with your home and workplace and widening out to your neighborhood, your region, the entire planet.  At each level, environmental factors impact human health.  At each level, we impact the environment with our choices and actions. This not only includes the quality of the air and water, but also the quality of our relationship with nature. Personal Environment: Environment free of toxins. The air you breathe, the water you drink, and even the noise levels in your personal spaces all impact your health in an immediate way. Nature and Us: Access to nature – biophilia. In addition to meeting some of our most basic needs, nature relaxes, refreshes, and heals us. In turn, we need to work to heal nature. Global Environment: Almost every choice you make affects the environment on some level. Working to create a sustainable lifestyle benefits the whole planet.
  • At its most basic level, security means freedom from fear, especially our most basic fears around health, personal safety, and financial stability. Because fear can immobilize and incapacitate us, security is essential to our wellbeing.Facing Fear: At its most basic level, security means freedom from fears that constrict us. To have true wellbeing in our lives, we need to face our fears and anxieties. Rethinking Money: Our society tells us that money brings happiness. But research suggests that isn’t always true and that we should rethink the role of money in our lives.Safety and Prevention: One of the most important things you can do for your wellbeing is to make wise decisions that keep yourself safe and healthy.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Culture of Wellbeing rests on employee wellbeing.Wellbeing leadership: A whole systems approach to improving the wellbeing of individuals, teams and organizations that focuses on personal growth, whole systems leadership and organizational transformation.
  • Vermont presentation oct 2013 (ln)

    1. 1. Cultivating Wellbeing in Our Lives and Communities Burack Lectureship University of Vermont October 2013 csh.umn.edu
    2. 2. 2 csh.umn.edu
    3. 3. WELLBEING • The case of wellbeing • Determinants of wellbeing • Cultivating Wellbeing - Lives, Communities, Universities and the Nation • Daring Greatly 3 csh.umn.edu
    4. 4. THE CASE FOR WELLBEING – SOBERING REALITY • Spend more money. • Health outcomes near the bottom. • Access to Care • Incidence of Medical Errors and Death 4 csh.umn.edu
    5. 5. FINANCIALLY NOT SUSTAINABLE 5 csh.umn.edu
    6. 6. FINANCIALLY NOT SUSTAINABLE 6 csh.umn.edu
    7. 7. 7 csh.umn.edu
    8. 8. WHY THE US DISADVANTAGE? • Quality of health care • Access to health care • Prevalence of health related behaviors • Adverse social and economic conditions • Less access to “safety net” programs that help buffer the effects of adverse economic and social conditions. • Physical and social environment in communities. 8 csh.umn.edu
    9. 9. SEARCHING FOR THE COMMON THREAD • Whole systems approach • Systems for health and social services, education and unemployment. • Promote healthy lifestyles. • Design healthier environments. 9 csh.umn.edu
    10. 10. INSIGHT • Not solely the province of government. • Effective policies in both the public and private sector. • Societal commitment to the health and welfare, ie wellbeing, of the entire population. 10 csh.umn.edu
    11. 11. 11 csh.umn.edu
    12. 12. 12 csh.umn.edu
    13. 13. Move Beyond “Fixing” Health Care…… Building Capacity in People and Communities 13 csh.umn.edu
    14. 14. DEFINING WELLBEING • Happy, healthy and prosperous • A state of being in balance or alignment • Content • Peaceful • Connected to purpose • In harmony • Safe 14 csh.umn.edu
    15. 15. What Impacts your Wellbeing? 15 csh.umn.edu
    16. 16. GALLUP ORGANIZATION • Love for what we do each day. • Relationships • Security of finances • Vibrancy of physical health • Pride in what we have contributed to the community 16 csh.umn.edu
    17. 17. GALLUP ORGANIZATION • 150 countries • More than 98% of the world’s population • Only 7% of people are thriving in all areas. • Elements universal across faiths, cultures and nationalities. • Spirituality impacts all domains. 17 csh.umn.edu
    18. 18. 18 csh.umn.edu
    19. 19. WELLBEING • Whole person • Increase capacity and expand potential • Possible even with chronic illness and maturing bodies • Individual, family, organizati on and community 19 csh.umn.edu
    20. 20. Physical Health Emotional Health Mental Health Spiritual Health 20 csh.umn.edu
    21. 21. Physical Activity and Fitness Diet & Nutrition Sleep Thoughts and Emotions Stress Mastery “Health is in your hands.” 21 csh.umn.edu
    22. 22. 22 csh.umn.edu
    23. 23. What gets you up in the morning? Aim Direction Different from job or career “Purpose matters.” 23 csh.umn.edu
    24. 24. • Be more reflective. • Be more courageous. • Be clear earlier about purpose! 24 csh.umn.edu
    25. 25. 25 csh.umn.edu
    26. 26. Close connections between people, formed by emotional bonds and interactions. Health risks of being alone are comparable in magnitude to the risks associated with cigarette smoking, high blood pressure and obesity. “Isolation is fatal.” 26 csh.umn.edu
    27. 27. • Are there people you are close to – family, friends? •Are there people you can turn to when you are …. •Are you personal relationships balanced in terms of giving and receiving? 27 csh.umn.edu
    28. 28. Capacity and Infrastructure: • Economic • Social • Cultural • Political • Technological • e.g. jobs, schools, transportation , crime, internet access, theaters, green space 28 csh.umn.edu
    29. 29. Engagement: • Participation • Connections Empowerment • Moved to action • Networks of citizen efforts 29 csh.umn.edu
    30. 30. People living in American cities with low wellbeing are twice as likely to have a heart attack as those who live in a city with high wellbeing. “Community nurtures and sustains us.” 30 csh.umn.edu
    31. 31. Clean air and water Free of toxins Access to Nature 31 csh.umn.edu
    32. 32. “Nature heals.” 32 csh.umn.edu
    33. 33. Basic Human Needs Job Finances Safety and Prevention “Fear immobilizes.” 33 csh.umn.edu
    34. 34. INDIVIDUAL WELLBEING ASSESSMENT • Individual Needs and Interests • Strengths • Capacity • Potential for Future Improvement • Basis for Personal Plan for Wellbeing 34 csh.umn.edu
    35. 35. 35 csh.umn.edu
    36. 36. ORGANIZATION WELLBEING ASSESSMENT • Purpose – clarity of mission and vision and alignment of strategic goals and resources • Health – employee health, financial health • Relationships – engagement, retention, satisfaction, turnover • Community – connections within and beyond • Environment – green practices, culture of sustainability and stewardship • Safety – personal safety, culture of safety 36 csh.umn.edu
    37. 37. UNIVERSITIES - MODELS OF WELLBEING COMMUNITIES • Wellbeing of faculty, staff and students is a foundation for academic and research excellence. • Universities – significantly impact their local communities and state. 37 csh.umn.edu
    38. 38. THE CASE FOR WELLBEING – COLLEGE CAMPUS’ Institutional Priorities: • Optimize student learning and development. • Improve retention and and timely graduation. • Attract and retain faculty and staff. • Achieve organizational efficiency and effectiveness. 38 csh.umn.edu
    39. 39. ORGANIZATIONAL SUCCESS • Research shows that the most successful, innovative organizations are built on cultures of engagement and wellbeing. • Best talent and the greatest contributions to society come not from organizations that pay the highest wages, but rather from organizations with the most effective cultures. 39 csh.umn.edu
    40. 40. 40 csh.umn.edu
    41. 41. 41 csh.umn.edu
    42. 42. GUSTAVUS • Students, faculty, staff and alumni • Academic Courses, advising and student life • Mindfulness • Peer Health Coaching • Culture Change 42 csh.umn.edu
    43. 43. GENTLE ACTION • Small changes can have large effects. • Turbulent systems may be very sensitive to change. Stable ones are highly resistant. • Great power – small, collaborative and highly coordinated actions. 43 csh.umn.edu
    44. 44. CENTER FOR SPIRITUALITY & HEALING • Established in 1995 • Interdisciplinary unit with an Academic Health Center – Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry, Public Health, and Veterinary Medicine. • Interdisciplinary Centers – Cancer Center, Genomics Center, Bioethics Center – work across collegiate units. 44 csh.umn.edu
    45. 45. VISION Advancing the health and wellbeing of individuals, organizations and communities through integrative health and healing. 45 csh.umn.edu
    46. 46. UNIVERSITY WIDE RESOURCE • 30 faculty with U of MN appointments – tenure, tenure-track or clinical • 20 community-based faculty • 10-12 staff • 5-6 students 46 csh.umn.edu
    47. 47. FUNDING 1% 8% 5% Philanthropy Extramural Support 34% 10% and Fees Tuition Medical System AHC Support Program Fees 3% 47 csh.umn.edu 49% 90% Other Factors Intramural Support
    48. 48. POSITIONING • Critical to Success • Relatively flat organization that is highly integrated within the university and community. • Partnerships 48 csh.umn.edu
    49. 49. SCOPE • Education • Research • Service • Public Engagement – outreach and policy 49 csh.umn.edu
    50. 50. GRADUATE MINOR IN INTEGRATIVE THERAPIES AND HEALING PRACTICES • • Anticipated students would come from the health sciences • 50 Began in 1999 for students enrolled in masters, PhD and professional programs. Surprise – students from business, law, architecture, music, hortic ulture…. csh.umn.edu
    51. 51. GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN INTEGRATIVE THERAPIES AND HEALING PRACTICES • Designed for practicing health professionals • Professional Development • Earn a credential • 12 credits minimum 51 csh.umn.edu
    52. 52. DEGREE PROGRAMS • Doctorate of Nursing Practice in Integrative Health and Healing. • Anticipated – MA – Health Coaching 52 csh.umn.edu
    53. 53. ENROLLMENT 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 53 csh.umn.edu
    54. 54. GRAD PROGRAM • • Formats – classroom, intensive, on-line and blended • Self-Designed Programs • 54 50+ courses Tracks/Concentrations csh.umn.edu
    55. 55. HEALTH COACHING • 2 year, 18 credit program • Lifestyle/behavior change • Graduates – clinics, health plans, health systems, schools, corporation s 55 csh.umn.edu
    56. 56. INTEGRATIVE THERAPIES • • • • • 56 Aromatherapy Acupressure Reiki Guided imagery Botanical Medicine csh.umn.edu
    57. 57. MIND/BODY • • Meditation • Advanced Meditation • 57 Intro to MBSR Mind/Body Healing Therapies csh.umn.edu
    58. 58. NATURE-BASED THERAPEUTICS • • Healing Gardens • Therapeutic Horticulture • Animal Assisted Therapy • 58 Therapeutic Landscapes Horse as Teacher csh.umn.edu
    59. 59. ARTS AND HEALING • • Music, health and healing • Movement and music for wellbeing and healing • 59 Creative arts in health and healing Healing imagery csh.umn.edu
    60. 60. SPIRITUALITY • • Peacemaking and spirituality • Forgiveness and healing • 60 Spirituality and resilience Cultures, faith traditions and health care csh.umn.edu
    61. 61. CULTURALLY-BASED HEALING • • Intro to TCM • Latinos: Culture and Health • Amazonian Plant Spirit Medicine • 61 Indigenous Hawaiian Healing Ayurveda Medicine csh.umn.edu
    62. 62. TIBETAN MEDICINE • • Yoga: Ethics, Spirituality and Healing • 62 Tibetan Medicine: Ethics, Spirituality and Healing India Course at Men-TseeKhang csh.umn.edu
    63. 63. WHOLE SYSTEMS HEALING • • Self, society and the environment • 63 Health and the Environment Food Choices: Healing the Earth, Healing Ourselves csh.umn.edu
    64. 64. RESEARCH RESEARCH • • 64 Quantitative and Qualitative Basic Science, Clinical Trials and Health Services Research csh.umn.edu
    65. 65. PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT • • Community-Based classes and programs • Taking Charge of Your Health & Wellbeing • 65 Lectures Policy csh.umn.edu
    66. 66. CARE MODEL INNOVATION • • Sustainable • Integrative • 66 Person-Centered Policy csh.umn.edu
    67. 67. MINDFULNESS The emphasis is on staying in the present moment, with a nonjudging, non-striving attitude of acceptance. 67 csh.umn.edu
    68. 68. MINDFULNESS AND WELLBEING • Academic Courses – undergraduate and graduate. • Student Club • Research • Community Programs 68 csh.umn.edu
    69. 69. 69 csh.umn.edu
    70. 70. 70 csh.umn.edu
    71. 71. 71 csh.umn.edu
    72. 72. 72 csh.umn.edu
    73. 73. CRISIS 73 csh.umn.edu
    74. 74. DARING GREATLY • Theodore Roosevelt used that phrase in a talk on “Citizenship in a Republic” in France in 1910. • What will it take to advance wellbeing? • Your lives • Communities • Organizations – including Universities • Nation 74 csh.umn.edu
    75. 75. PARTNERSHIPS 75 csh.umn.edu
    76. 76. 76 csh.umn.edu

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