Laura brown three year review

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  • Heres what Id like to cover with you today. I’ll talk about a few of my major program areas, focusing on community economic development and a major teaching event- response to flooding disasters. I’ve planned for about an hour presentation but I’m open to questions so feel free to jump in if you’d like clarification or if you have questions about anything.
  • My position was new when I was hired in 2007 ( it had been 25 years since the last CNRED educator was in Crawford County). Two major areas of programming identified in the 2007 needs assessment in scoping the position. This also left a lot of room for me to create the position to make the most of my skills and interests. Throughout the past 3 years I have continually modified my program based on input from stakeholders and partners. This year I am planning another needs assessment, focused more specifically on economic development to better scope my role in conjunction with the development of a new county economic development corporation.
  • CED as the overarching umbrella for my programs…
  • I have used logic models to help structure my programs
  • All of you are probably familiar with Crawford County- our situation was not unlike other rural counties in the state: Overall there were very few existing organizations or professionals working in Crawford County Economic development preparedness Entrepreneurship & small business development Tourism Community philanthropy
  • There are many ways to approach community / economic development – In traditional economic development thinking and practice, the focus in on markets (what do we import and export), space, and resources (like workforce, capital, infrastructure etc). This leads to traditional economic development practice –the smokestack chasing mentality. Glen Puvler and Ron Schaffer, whom you are probably familiar with, suggested that we should also consider the norms, and values decision making capacity, and rules (human made or otherwise) that affect economies. This model accounts for community assets- an
  • Ec Dev preparedness is one aspect of my ec dev programming- this includes community education about what economic development is and how specific economic development issues impact peoples lives. This happens through my newsletter and through bi-monthly snapshots- migration patters, laborshed, internet access, changing ag economy,
  • Facilitated Tourism Assessment (2008) with over 50 stakeholders from tourism organizations throughouit the county. We set goals for tourism development- one key priority was education
  • The educational goal of the assessment was relaized through this presentation…Communicate the impact of tourism: “Making the Most of Our Great Places” teaching materials I also: Evaluate the impact of tourism- festival surveys First Impressions visits and reports Prairie du Chien & Ferryville Tourism Council Education Committee
  • The Inventors and Entrepreneurs Clubs were formed in Wisconsin to help create a culture of that is more supportive to entrepreneurship and business development. Despite the name, these clubs are really about creating a culture that makes it ok for businesses, wherever, they are in their development, to take the next step – so its not always about new business development. The hope is that folks who have or have had businesses will participate as well and offer guidance to others. Business education Peer education Peer support
  • There are now about 40 clbs throughout Wisconsin- I co facilitate two of these- one based in Viroqua and one in Prairie du Chien. The structure of the meetings is generally the same- we host a speaker on a specific toipic each month- ( Chick Sara pictured on left). We also provide tables of resources, upcoming SBDC classes, workshops, financing information from alternative lenders, business counseling etc. Our hope is that this information will help buesiness owners and inventors learn about the right steps to take in starting a business or bringing a product to market. Supporting each other means opportunities to share information. This can be anything from where to get business cards printed, to how to start marketing online. On the right is our local business counselor Mariyln Huckenpoehler from Couleecap. Resource providers are an important part of the clubs network as well. These include bankers, business counselors, prototype people (tool and dye, design work like CAD or electronics), financial and accounting folks, lawyers, marketing and sales people. Often club members have experience in these fields and offer to help!
  • Crawford County is currently served by 2 business counselors, both part time, each of which have multiple counties. I serve as a first stop for many businesses providing basic information and making referrals to appropriate resources. This is a piece that I developed specifically for value added food and agricultural businesses. In an I&E club survey I conducted last fall we found that 39% of attendees were in agriculture related business and 32% in food and beverage. This Combined with growing interest for incubator kitchen spurred the development of these materials. They are being used in Gays Mills and beyond at I&E clubs.
  • Community philanthropy I another area of community economic development that emerged after I attended a Growing Community wealth summit in 2008 that highlighted the possibility for transfer of wealth to benefit Crawford County (specifically that there could be over 10 million dollars available to us over the next decade if we could capture just 5% of total TOW). Working with the county board chairman I hosted educational meetings and published press releases about community philanthropy. This led to…
  • I continue to work as an ex-officio member of the community fund board. The fund now has a $69,000 endowment and $2000 special projects fund Goals identified at the strategic planning session were EDUCATION – of the board and the community- defining economic development and strategies GROW OUR FINANCIAL CAPACITY- increase grant funding, fundraising, develop and implement a fundraising strategy BETTER UNDERSTAND OUR NEEDS AND OPPORTUNITIES- including the economics of Crawford County GROW BOARD CAPACITY- broad based, develop committee structure PR- OUTREACH
  • In 2007 and 2008 the community of was struck by two devastating flooding events and was largely unprepared for the long recovery and planning process that would follow. In the first flood alone 50 homes in the Village, 17% of all housing units, were substantially damaged. FEMA documented $4.8 million in damage to households and $3.6 million to public roads and bridges throughout the county[1]. [1] Federal Emergency Management Agency My role was not immediately clear..I stepped in as the need arose. There was no one directing the recovery process. Messy!!
  • Reference success story
  • Following the first flood in 2007, Crawford County Community Development Educator Laura Brown worked collaboratively with the SBDC and government agencies to address business needs through economic impact assessments, surveying business owners about unmet needs, and coordinating with local business counselors to make businesses aware of essential emergency resources. When the second flood occurred less than nine months later, business owners expressed frustration at the lack of interest and response to their needs by federal agencies as well as feelings of exclusion of local planning efforts . In 2008 FEMA hired a planning team to initiate an intensive three month planning effort to explore concrete options for mitigating flooding or relocating the village. To facilitate input from business owners for the flood recovery plan Brown coordinated with the Gays Mills Economic Development Association (GMEDA) and SBDC Counselor to facilitate a business focus group and one-on-one counseling. The focus group revealed that residents and business owners were interested in learning more about other effective examples of flood recovery and community economic development. Brown coordinated with FEMA planners to facilitate a day long Economic Development and Flood Recovery Tour to Mineral Point and Darlington highlighting topics of particular interest to village residents including: historic preservation, downtown revitalization, flood mitigation, arts and tourism promotion. Brown, L. (2007). “The Economic Impact of August 19, 2007 Flood on the Crawford County Economy.” Brown, L. (2007). “Information for Businesses and Farms Affected by Flooding.” Brown, L. and G. Smith. (2008). “A Survey of Downtown Businesses in Gays Mills, Wisconsin.” Published in partnership with the Wisconsin Small Business Development Center.
  • To facilitate input from business owners for the flood recovery plan Brown coordinated with the Gays Mills Economic Development Association (GMEDA) and SBDC Counselor to facilitate a business focus group and one-on-one counseling. The focus group revealed that residents and business owners were interested in learning more about other effective examples of flood recovery and community economic development. Brown coordinated with FEMA planners to facilitate a day long Economic Development and Flood Recovery Tour to Mineral Point and Darlington highlighting topics of particular interest to village residents including: historic preservation, downtown revitalization, flood mitigation, arts and tourism promotion. Brown, L. (2007). “The Economic Impact of August 19, 2007 Flood on the Crawford County Economy.” Brown, L. (2007). “Information for Businesses and Farms Affected by Flooding.” Brown, L. and G. Smith. (2008). “A Survey of Downtown Businesses in Gays Mills, Wisconsin.” Published in partnership with the Wisconsin Small Business Development Center.
  • Brown, L.  (2007). “ Rebuilding Our Foundations: After the Flood.” First of a ten part series published in the Crawford County Courier Press in Conjunction with the Building Communities Wisline Education Series. “ Flood Recovery and Economic Revitalization Tour” flyer and article “ Trip Opens Eyes to Recovery Effort. ” Crawford County Courier Press, October 2008.   Brown, L. (2008). “ With Growing Hope: A Study of the August 2007 Kickapoo Flood in the Village of Gays Mills: Finding Hope in Disaster.” Center for Land Use Education Land Use Tracker, Spring 2008.
  • Village of Gays Mills community survey and survey results report. Brown, L. (2009). “Crawford Vernon Area Incubator Kitchen Survey Results.”
  • Extent to which materials developed are valued and used by colleagues and stakeholders
  • Extent to which materials developed are valued and used by colleagues and stakeholders
  • Extent to which materials developed are valued and used by colleagues and stakeholders
  • Extent to which materials developed are valued and used by colleagues and stakeholders
  • Laura brown three year review

    1. 1. Laura E. Brown Community Resource Development Educator UW Extension Crawford County Three-Year Review June 17, 2010
    2. 2. Review Team <ul><li>Pat Malone, CNRED Program Area Liaison </li></ul><ul><li>J eff Hoffman, Dept. of Community Resource Development Vice Chair </li></ul><ul><li>Vance Haugen Crawford County UW Extension Department Head </li></ul><ul><li>Dick Pederson, UW Extension Southern District Director </li></ul>
    3. 3. Presentation Overview <ul><li>Needs Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Current Major Program Initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Significant Teaching Event </li></ul><ul><li>Program Impacts </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholder Accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Future Program Directions </li></ul>
    4. 4. Needs Assessment <ul><li>2007 CNRED needs assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic Development including job growth and preparedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comprehensive and land use planning </li></ul></ul><ul><li>On going assessment – </li></ul><ul><ul><li>community leaders, elected officials, non profits, economic development organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2010 Econ. Dev. Preparedness Survey </li></ul>
    5. 5. Major Program Initiatives <ul><li>2010 Plan of Work </li></ul><ul><li>Community Economic Development </li></ul><ul><li>Community & Comprehensive Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability - Local Foods & Energy Independence </li></ul>
    6. 6. Community Economic Development
    7. 7. <ul><li>The Situation </li></ul><ul><li>Rural, declining economic base in agriculture and manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of capacity and cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Economic downturn & severe flooding </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of infrastructure to support “smokestacks” </li></ul><ul><li>Tradition of entrepreneurship and emerging new markets </li></ul><ul><li>Un-paralleled tourism assets </li></ul>Community Economic Development
    8. 8. Community Economic Development
    9. 9. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Response: Asset based, community oriented </li></ul>
    10. 10. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Economic Development Preparedness </li></ul>
    11. 11. Community Economic Development <ul><li>2008 Tourism Assessment </li></ul>Tourism Development
    12. 12. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Festival surveys </li></ul><ul><li>First impressions visits & reports </li></ul><ul><li>Tourism Council Education Committee </li></ul><ul><li>Communicating the impact of tourism: “Making the Most of Our Great Places” & case studies </li></ul>Tourism Development
    13. 13. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Entrepreneurship & Business Development </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Inventors & Entrepreneurs Clubs </li></ul>
    14. 14. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Entrepreneurship & Small Development </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Inventors & Entrepreneurs Clubs </li></ul>
    15. 15. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Entrepreneurship & Business Development </li></ul><ul><li>One-on-one business education </li></ul>
    16. 16. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Community Philanthropy </li></ul>
    17. 17. Community Economic Development <ul><li>Community Philanthropy </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an economic development focused community fund </li></ul><ul><li>Convene stakeholder group </li></ul><ul><li>Educate fund board and community about basic economic development principles </li></ul><ul><li>Document program impacts (river cleanup, feasibility study, farmers market coupons) </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic planning: mission “Creates stronger communities by matching generosity with economic needs” </li></ul>
    18. 18. Community & Comprehensive Planning <ul><li>Facilitate County Planning process </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive planning workshop series </li></ul><ul><li>One-on-one meetings with town- village plan commissions </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive Planning Teaching Packet </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate planning concepts and status to elected officials </li></ul><ul><li>Assess county-wide tax bill survey and communicate results </li></ul><ul><li>Public open houses </li></ul>County, Town, Village Planning
    19. 19. Significant Teaching Event <ul><li>Economic and Small Business Recovery Following the Gays Mills Flooding Disaster </li></ul>Gays Mills, population 625 was severely impacted by flooding of the Kickapoo River in 2007 and 2008
    20. 20. Significant Teaching Event <ul><li>Lack of leadership structure - decision making capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of support for business recovery </li></ul><ul><li>Need for education about alternatives- relocate or stay? </li></ul><ul><li>Urgent needs versus long term planning </li></ul>
    21. 21. Significant Teaching Event <ul><li>Response: </li></ul><ul><li>Economic impact of flooding report </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment of business needs </li></ul><ul><li>Counseling for flood affected businesses </li></ul><ul><li>“ Information for Businesses Affected by Flooding” </li></ul>
    22. 22. Significant Teaching Event <ul><li>Response: </li></ul><ul><li>Economic Development & Flood Recovery Tour </li></ul>
    23. 23. Significant Teaching Event <ul><li>Building Communities Education Series </li></ul><ul><li>Gays Mills Business Survey </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive Planning Education </li></ul><ul><li>“ Land Use Tracker” </li></ul>
    24. 24. Significant Teaching Event <ul><li>Comprehensive planning $25,000 grant </li></ul><ul><li>UW Madison Landscape Architecture Student </li></ul><ul><li>Gays Mills Kitchen Incubator Use Survey </li></ul>
    25. 25. Program Impacts <ul><li>Survey results incorporated into long term recovery plans </li></ul><ul><li>Community residents had access to information for informed decision-making </li></ul><ul><li>Village will adopt a comprehensive plan in 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Businesses and entrepreneurs are receiving timely and appropriate information </li></ul>
    26. 26. Program Impacts <ul><li>Community & Economic Development </li></ul><ul><li>Newsletter annual evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Inventors & Entrepreneurs Club membership survey </li></ul><ul><li>Crawford County Community Fund </li></ul><ul><li>Tourism Assessment process participant survey </li></ul><ul><li>“ I think often of where Crawford County would be without Laura and I can tell you that we would be at least two years behind in the progress we've made. She is a tremendous champion who can work with many different types of people and who has worked extremely hard to put Crawford County on the map.” “Laura was responsible for giving us the idea [of the Community Fund]... None of this would have happened without her.” </li></ul>
    27. 27. Program Impacts <ul><li>Comprehensive Planning </li></ul><ul><li>18 of 21 communities have completed a plan </li></ul><ul><li>Plan commissions are functional and active </li></ul><ul><li>Broader countywide understanding of the value of planning- plan passed county board unanimously </li></ul><ul><li>Broader understanding of resident perceptions by elected officials “We don’t want to be the Dells” </li></ul>
    28. 28. Program Impacts <ul><li>Comprehensive Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Annual evaluation of my role with local plan commissions </li></ul><ul><li>“ I am so grateful for Laura. Her persistent steady and very informed approach is why Gays Mills even started the planning process. She coached us forward and has given our plan commission so much support.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ When I agreed to help our Plan Commission develop a plan, Laura was invaluable in helping me to quickly become familiar with what would be required, answering questions, providing fact sheets & other resources. She has been our Plan Commission's primary source of information on the planning process.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Laura has brought a wealth of programs and information to our county – her leadership is unsurpassed.” </li></ul>
    29. 29. Accountability to UW Extension <ul><li>Annual planning and reporting </li></ul><ul><li>Regular attendance at district and program area meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Service on CNRED/ Cross Program Area Teams </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tourism Team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emerging Agricultural Markets Team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainability Team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Southern District CNRED Liaison </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CCED Building Communities Webinar Series Site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CCED Revitalizing Downtowns Webinar Series Site </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Service in CRD Department </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research and Studies Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Service in WEECDA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Active Member </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Accountability to Crawford County <ul><li>Monthly Ag & Extension Committee report </li></ul><ul><li>County office annual report </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly media releases </li></ul><ul><li>Bi-monthly newsletter and website </li></ul><ul><li>Letters to elected officials regarding upcoming programs </li></ul><ul><li>Regular education and reports to County Board </li></ul><ul><li>Formal and informal needs assessments: surveys, conversations, monitoring media </li></ul>
    31. 31. Future Program Directions <ul><li>Sustainable, Community Based Economic Development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Formation of a County Economic Development Corporation / Economic Development Needs Assessment & Summit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborative opportunities for City and County </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Energy Independence Planning and Implementation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Energy efficiency </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Renewables </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Energy Independence Teams- Natural Step Circles </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local foods Initiatives (Farm to School, farmers markets) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Possible future areas of study / research- community resiliency, asset based economic development strategies, economic and business development following disasters, links between leadership and economic development, local foods focus as an economic development strategy, rural “food deserts,” eco-tourism </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. Professional Development <ul><li>Economic Development Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Community Development Society </li></ul><ul><li>American Planning Association </li></ul><ul><li>CNRED Symposium/Colloquium- October All staff Conference </li></ul><ul><li>Explore opportunities for research / PhD, or additional masters degree </li></ul>
    33. 33. Questions and Discussion <ul><li>Thank you! </li></ul><ul><li>Laura Brown </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Blog: fyi.uwex.edu/crawfordcommunity </li></ul><ul><li>Website: bit.ly/crawfordcommunity </li></ul>

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