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Module B - June 2011 - Craven

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An outline of the approach to the HSC Module B - Critical study of Text.

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Module B - June 2011 - Craven

  1. 1. MODULE B<br />Critical Study of Texts <br />A Marker’s Perspective<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  2. 2. The answer: <br /><ul><li>Module – Critical Study
  3. 3. Elective – The Prescribed Text
  4. 4. Question – if only we knew!</li></ul>L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  5. 5. BOS Syllabus Rubric:<br />Module B: Critical Study of Texts <br />This module requires students to explore and evaluate a specific text and its reception in a range of contexts. It develops students’ understanding of questions of textual integrity. <br />Each elective in this module requires close study of a single text to be chosen from a list of prescribed texts. <br />Students explore the ideas expressed in the text through analysing its construction, content and language. They examine how particular features of the text contribute to textual integrity. They research others’ perspectives of the text and test these against their own understanding and interpretations of the text. Students discuss and evaluate the ways in which the set work has been read, received and valued in historical and other contexts. They extrapolate from this study of a particular text to explore questions of textual integrity and significance. <br />Students develop a range of imaginative, interpretive and analytical compositions that relate to the study of their specific text. These compositions may be realised in a variety of forms and media. <br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  6. 6. In a nutshell … student speak…<br />Know your text! …. READ IT more than once!<br />It’s a CLOSE STUDY. So know its:<br /><ul><li>core ideas
  7. 7. Construction / structure
  8. 8. language features
  9. 9. purpose
  10. 10. audience
  11. 11. context</li></ul>RUBRIC<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  12. 12. Module b – the controversial module…<br />The following aspects of the BOS rubric have been misinterpreted by websites, study guides and other such resources:<br /><ul><li>reception in a range of contexts
  13. 13. research others’ perspectives of the text and test these against their own understanding and interpretations
  14. 14. read, received and valued in historical and other contexts</li></ul>L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  15. 15. It is not about theorists, or:<br /><ul><li>critics!
  16. 16. squeezing as many ‘isms’ as possible into your response.
  17. 17. Or the 50 different appropriations or film versions you have seen!</li></ul>L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  18. 18. BOS Module b support documentPublished 2007<br />www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au<br />(Look for English Support Documents)<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  19. 19. L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  20. 20. L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  21. 21. It is all about your personal engagement and informed understanding of the text!<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  22. 22. What on earth is textual integrity????<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  23. 23. Student speak…<br /><ul><li>How do all the parts of the text work together to shape its meaning?
  24. 24. Do all these parts when working together create complex ideas?
  25. 25. Does the unity of all these parts make the text distinctive, significant or valuable?
  26. 26. EVALUATE is the key directive here! Have an opinion about the text!</li></ul>L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  27. 27. How is it marked?<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  28. 28. The Facts…<br />Marked over 4 weeks <br />at Homebush Bay<br />By over 100 markers (English teachers)<br />Each paper is marked twice, sometimes three times.<br />Scripts are marked by specialist teachers according to text type.<br />You are one in a bundle of 20 from your school.<br />You and your school are anonymous.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  29. 29. QUESTION<br />Dealing with the<br /><ul><li>The BOS is against students going into the exam with their pre-written response that they’ll copy word for word. Therefore you must deal with the question!
  30. 30. Spend time pulling it apart. Look at all the words and how they might apply to your text.
  31. 31. Use the exact phrasing of the question (hit us over the head with it).
  32. 32. Be sure to make links to the rubric – module / elective expectations.
  33. 33. DO A PLAN!</li></ul>L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  34. 34. 2010 HSC Question:<br />In the Skin of a Lion <br />‘Ondaatje’s In the Skin of a Lion continues to engage readers through its narrative treatment ofisolation and uncertainty.’<br />Cloudstreet <br />‘Winton’s Cloudstreet continues to engage readers through its narrative treatment of hardship and optimism.’ <br />Sixty Lights <br />‘Jones’s Sixty Lights continues to engage readers through its narrative treatment of upheaval and discovery.’ <br />Jane Eyre <br />‘Brontë’s Jane Eyre continues to engage readers through its narrative treatment of expectationsand love.’<br />***<br />In the light of your critical study, does this statement resonate with your own interpretation of your text? <br />In your response, make detailed reference to the novel. <br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  35. 35. 2009 HSC Question:<br />In the Skin of a Lion <br />Through its portrayal of human experience, Ondaatje’s In the Skin of a Lion reinforces the significance of honesty. <br />Cloudstreet <br />Through its portrayal of human experience, Winton’s Cloudstreet reinforces the significance of hope. <br />Sixty Lights <br />Through its portrayal of human experience, Jones’ Sixty Lights reinforces the significance of endurance. <br />Jane Eyre <br />Through its portrayal of human experience, Brontë’sJane Eyre reinforces the significance of resilience. <br />***<br />To what extent does your interpretation of your text support this view? In your response, make detailed reference to the novel. <br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  36. 36. The Exam paper<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  37. 37. L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  38. 38. What do I have to do to get an ‘a’?<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  39. 39. <ul><li>Key words: skillful, detailed, perceptive, sustained
  40. 40. “Skillful” – deliberate, well selected ideas and textual anaylsis
  41. 41. Deliberate construction of a response
  42. 42. A sense of arguing with the question
  43. 43. Sustained – continuous, all aspects of the response.
  44. 44. Can have flaws! A first draft that is holistically marked to fit the criteria as a whole.</li></ul>L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  45. 45. A student exemplar<br />From the BOS Support Document.<br /><ul><li>Cloudstreet
  46. 46. Speeches</li></ul>With marker comment.<br />NB – examination rubric has changed.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  47. 47. Key words: effective, detailed, informed,<br />Methodical, my have many flaws, some inconsistencies<br />…but still clearly know their stuff.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  48. 48. Key words: appropriate, sound<br />Still as sense of argument and engagement with the question<br />Inconsistent, may forget the question<br />Does not select ideas and textual evidence as judiciously.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  49. 49. Key words: some, limited … student is trying!<br />May rely on storytelling / recount<br />May use quotes and/or techniques but not further any argument.<br />Limited ideas – lacks thought / depth <br />Poor expression <br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  50. 50. Key words: attempts, elementary<br />Really this student has no idea.<br />Does not engage with question<br />May mention a quote or technique but without purpose<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  51. 51. Marker’s comments<br />From the 2010 HSC<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  52. 52. General comments<br />Stronger responses, candidates carefully considered arguments and thoughtfully selected, detailed textual references to support a perceptive thesis.<br />Insightful responses demonstrated a strong sense of personal engagement .Very few responses simply relied on interpretations of others and ‘readings’.<br />Weaker responses tended to be descriptive and made limited reference to the language and ideas of the text. They lacked development and did not sustain a coherent and detailed argument. These responses also reflected a limited understanding of the demands of the question.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  53. 53. Michael Ondaatje, In the Skin of a Lion<br />Better responses presented a skilful argument about the concepts of isolation and uncertainty in the novel. Most focused on the role of Patrick Lewis to further their discussion and explored the isolation of the immigrant workers within the contextual framework. These responses were very insightful in viewing the text as a reflection of the human experience and presented an informed personal response to the text which was aided by a perceptive view of the narrative form.<br />Weaker responses tended to rely on recount with limited textual reference and little or no appreciation of the narrative form.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  54. 54. Tim Winton, Cloudstreet<br />Better responses presented an informed personal response to the question in terms of hardship and optimism. These responses took a holistic approach to the text and presented a perceptive understanding of the way Winton used his narrative form to advance these ideas. They chose relevant textual details to support an insightful discussion.<br />In weaker responses, candidates presented a limited view of the text, often confining their discussion to one or two characters and their hardships, or retelling the story to show the nature of the characters’ hardships. Often these responses lacked development or an overall awareness of the narrative form<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  55. 55. Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre<br />In better responses, candidates engaged skilfully with the key words of ‘expectations’ and ‘love’ within the novel. These responses were characterised by a detailed knowledge of the novel and of Bronte’s narrative treatment of Jane’s nineteenth-century world. Examples of ‘expectations’ and ‘love’ were well selected and supported by a strong personal voice and thesis.<br />Weaker responses tended to list examples of ‘love’ within the plot, particularly Jane’s struggle to find true love. ‘Expectations’ was often defined as the nineteenth century expectations of women’s roles, and while this may have some relevance to the question, an overwhelming focus on Bronte’s context did not necessarily support a thesis about the narrative treatment of ‘love’ and ‘expectations’.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  56. 56. Henrik Ibsen, A Doll’s House<br />In better responses, candidates developed an informed personal response to the play to present a skilful view of the treatment of the concepts of entrapment and release. These candidates had a very perceptive view of the contextual influences on the characters and extrapolated this to view the play from a contemporary perspective. Textual support was well chosen and there was an insightful understanding of the dramatic treatment of these ideas.<br />In weaker responses, candidates often focused on the plot or a discussion of the context rather than directly addressing the question. These responses made limited reference to the play and had little appreciation of the dramatic impact of the text<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  57. 57. www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au<br />For further information on past question.<br /> markers guidelines and comments.<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />
  58. 58. PRACTISE<br />MAKES<br />PERFECT<br />L.Craven GHS. ETA Day June 2011<br />

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