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Building a developer community in an enterprise world

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My experiences and learnings of building a developer community in the past couple of years as a Developer Advocate at IBM for the WAS Liberty Java EE application server software.

Actually, a lot of the early material is historical and the credits slide at the end lists the several people who I thank for sharing their own experiences of setting up the WASdev community. Images are also credited in a slide at the end.

Presented at DevRelCon, the first European developer relations event (http://london-2015.devrel.net/), organised by Matt Revell. 30th September 2015

Published in: Software
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Building a developer community in an enterprise world

  1. 1. Building a developer community in an enterprise world Laura Cowen | Developer Advocate laura_cowen@uk.ibm.com | @lauracowen | WASdev.net
  2. 2. WASdev...WHATdev? ● 20-year-old WebSphere Application Server (aka WAS) ● 3-year-old WAS Liberty
  3. 3. What we mean by 'community'
  4. 4. We want Java EE developers to love Liberty so much they tell their friends to use it too. Our aim
  5. 5. In practice ● Free, credible technical resources & downloads. ● Shared expertise within community. ● Openness.
  6. 6. Where did we start?
  7. 7. Whiteboard session at Devoxx 2008 `
  8. 8. Community before Liberty
  9. 9. ibm.com & jazz.net (2011)
  10. 10. IBM's developerWorks (2011)
  11. 11. Motivating the Liberty developers
  12. 12. Maintaining fresh content
  13. 13. Building a pipeline of contributions
  14. 14. Motivating & mentoring
  15. 15. Recognising the complementary roles of marketing and development
  16. 16. How we were
  17. 17. Hooking them vs detail
  18. 18. Our timelines & metrics
  19. 19. Understanding our users and advocating for them (over and over)
  20. 20. Everything published on WASdev.net should support our aim of building a developer community.
  21. 21. Don't publish everything
  22. 22. Empathising with users
  23. 23. In summary...
  24. 24. What we've learnt ● Define community. ● Challenge the status quo. ● Fund the work properly. ● Build the internal sub-community too. ● Understand the development and marketing relationship. ● Defend the target audience.
  25. 25. Is it working?
  26. 26. Some feedback
  27. 27. From WebsFear to Awesome
  28. 28. Big shout-out to... ● Archive.org for the old screenshots ● Zoe Slattery, Simon Maple, Alasdair Nottingham, Ross Pavitt, Andrew Gatford, Seth Packham for their memories of Project Aries, Liberty and WASdev, and Jazz.net ● Paul Johnston, Lorna Bowman, Andy Piper for telling me on Facebook what they'd like to hear in this talk ● Geoff Pirie, Andy Stanford-Clark, and the Liberty
  29. 29. Photo credits ● Devoxx 2008 whiteboard session was convened by Stephen Colebourne; Sven Reimers took the photos, which he gave me permission to use: https://plus.google.com/photos/107881392009025418058/albums/5279201328235757297 ● Apache Retreat UK wigwams – https://www.flickr.com/photos/zoeslattery/5004533171 ● Coffee - https://www.flickr.com/photos/trophygeek/7309935684 ● Pipeline - https://www.flickr.com/photos/kailehmann/17811970319 ● Racoon confrontation - https://www.flickr.com/photos/tambako/7460999402 ● Shiny stones - https://www.flickr.com/photos/82955120@N05 ● Binary - https://www.flickr.com/photos/lamenta3/2603529812 ● Spiral clock - https://www.flickr.com/photos/jdbaskin/7192766626 ● No - https://www.flickr.com/photos/49889874@N05 ● Empathy map - https://www.flickr.com/photos/visualpunch/7245656774

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