Nonfiction Features Gr 4-5

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Nonfiction Features Gr 4-5

  1. 1. By Mrs. Paula McMullen Library TeacherNorwood Public Schools
  2. 2. Nonfiction books have external and internal features that organize, highlight, show and explain information for the reader. Good readers understand and use these features to help them to better understand the subjects in nonfiction books. The following slides will show examples of external and internal features. Please note that internal features include: text organizers, graphics, illustrations, print features and other special features. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 2 Norwood Public Schools
  3. 3. Readers examine the following external features before reading nonfiction books: •Book Covers •Book Flaps •Spine Labels (on library books) Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 3 Norwood Public Schools
  4. 4. This is the front cover of a book. Good readers read the title and examine the illustration. Then, they make predictions about what the book will be about. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 4 Norwood Public Schools
  5. 5. The front book flap presents information about the subject of the book. Readers can often decide if they want to read the book based on the contents of the front book flap. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 5 Norwood Public Schools
  6. 6. The rear book flap contains information about the author. The rear book flap also contains information about the illustrator. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 6 Norwood Public Schools
  7. 7. This back cover provides information on the book’s subject. It provides examples of other books in the series. It also provides information about the two reading levels in this series. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 7 Norwood Public Schools
  8. 8. This is the back cover of the book called Baby Apes. The back cover of this book tells the reader that this is one book in a series called Baby Animals. This back cover lists all the other books in the series so readers can look for them in the library. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 8 Norwood Public Schools
  9. 9. The spine label is located at the bottom of a library book’s spine. The call number is on the spine label. If the call number has a number and the first three letters of an author’s last name, it is a nonfiction book that can be used as an information resource. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 9 Norwood Public Schools
  10. 10. Library books on the same subject have the same call number and are located next to each other on the shelf. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 10 Norwood Public Schools
  11. 11. Readers examine these text organizers before reading the book: •Title Page •Contents Page •Introduction •Glossary •Index Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 11 Norwood Public Schools
  12. 12. • The title page presents the title, the author, the illustrator and the publishing company. • Libraries will often stamp the name of their library on this page. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 12 Norwood Public Schools
  13. 13. The Contents Page lists all the chapters as they appear in the book. It also lists the Glossary and Index, located at the back of the book. The Contents Page tells the reader what topics will be covered in each chapter of the book. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 13 Norwood Public Schools
  14. 14. This Contents Page explains that bolded words are found in the Glossary. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 14 Norwood Public Schools
  15. 15. Although it does not use the words “Contents Page,” this page lists the chapters in a book. The chapters, Glossary, and Index are always in chronological order – as they appear in the book. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 15 Norwood Public Schools
  16. 16. The Introduction is located at the front of the book, after the Contents Page. The Introduction tells what topics the book will cover. It can also tell us why the author wrote the book, and how the book should be used. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 16 Norwood Public Schools
  17. 17. The Glossary is located near the back of the book. The Glossary provides definitions for important or difficult words in the book. It lists these words in alphabetical order. Each entry word is bolded to make it easier to find. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 17 Norwood Public Schools
  18. 18. The Index is located at the end of the book. The Index is an alphabetical listing of every topic the book covers. The Index also shows the page number(s) where readers can find information on the topics. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 18 Norwood Public Schools
  19. 19. Readers understand information better with illustrations that show what things look like. Illustrations include: •Drawings – made by the illustrator •Collages – put together by illustrator •Photographs – taken by a camera Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 19 Norwood Public Schools
  20. 20. This illustration is a drawing. There is a small label telling the reader that the animal on the left is an American Toad. When readers look carefully at this photograph, they can infer that the snake is a threat to the toad. There is no caption explaining the picture to the reader. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 20 Norwood Public Schools
  21. 21. This illustration is a drawing that shows snakes shedding their skin. The caption explains to the reader that the snake’s skin is very thin. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 21 Norwood Public Schools
  22. 22. This is a double-page drawing. It covers facing pages in a book. The drawing shows animals found in the open sea. It also shows the number of these ocean creatures on the page. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 22 Norwood Public Schools
  23. 23. In this cutaway drawing, the illustrator has cut away part of the ground and tree roots to show the creatures who live below and behind. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 23 Norwood Public Schools
  24. 24. This illustration of a monkey is a collage made of thin strips of wood. The heading is in larger color print. Below the heading, you can see the geographical location and remaining number of this endangered animal. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 24 Norwood Public Schools
  25. 25. This illustration is a photograph of a toucan bird. The photograph has a label with an arrow pointing to the bird’s large bill. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 25 Norwood Public Schools
  26. 26. Some illustrations compare an unfamiliar object, like a baby bat, to something we know, like a person’s hand. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 26 Norwood Public Schools
  27. 27. A close-up focuses on a detail, or small part, of something. This photograph is a close-up of the clear skin that covers a boa’s eye. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 27 Norwood Public Schools
  28. 28. These photographs show the stages in the panda’s life cycle. The arrows show us the direction our eyes should travel as we read the captions that describe each photograph. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 28 Norwood Public Schools
  29. 29. These photographs show the stages of development in an orangutan’s life. Readers match the circled number to the numbered caption when examining this illustration. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 29 Norwood Public Schools
  30. 30. Graphics help the reader to see, compare and understand facts. Graphics include: •Tables •Charts •Diagrams •Maps Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 30 Norwood Public Schools
  31. 31. This is a Table called Length of Life of Animals. Tables allow the reader to see and compare information. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 31 Norwood Public Schools
  32. 32. This Table is called Interesting Facts About Reptiles. The first part of each fact is bolded so readers can easily pick out each fact. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 32 Norwood Public Schools
  33. 33. This chart is a bar graph. It shows endangered animals as of 2004. The purple bar shows the US figures; the gold bar shows the foreign figures. The key shows what the bar colors stand for. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 33 Norwood Public Schools
  34. 34. This chart shows in feet how high different types of birds can fly. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 34 Norwood Public Schools
  35. 35. This pie chart visually shows the greatest threats to US endangered species in percentages. According to this chart, hunting is the greatest threat to US endangered species. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 35 Norwood Public Schools
  36. 36. A diagram is a labeled drawing or photograph. A diagram provides labels of the parts of a whole object. As the heading indicates, this diagram shows the parts of a ladybug. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 36 Norwood Public Schools
  37. 37. This page shows a diagram of the parts of a panda’s body below the Glossary. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 37 Norwood Public Schools
  38. 38. This is a map. Maps help the reader understand where things are in the world. The large bolded word “Africa” tells the reader it is a map of that continent. The red box labeled “Chimpanzee Habitat” shows where chimpanzees live. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 38 Norwood Public Schools
  39. 39. Using the title and the map key, the reader can tell that the top map shows the farm products of U.S. regions. Using the title and map key, the reader can tell that the bottom map shows the importance of agriculture to state economies. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 39 Norwood Public Schools
  40. 40. Readers understand that print features focus your attention on specific parts of a nonfiction book. Print Features include: •Titles •Headings •Boldface Print •Italics •Captions •Labels •Bullets Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 40 Norwood Public Schools
  41. 41. The chapter title is bolded and in larger print to call attention to it. The title tells the reader what the topic will be in thatChapter Title chapter. The reader knows what to expect when reading that chapter. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher, 11/6/2009 41 Norwood Public Schools
  42. 42. The heading “Bright Eyes” is bolded and in a larger print. There are several other headings on this page: “Touch,” “Smell,” and “Taste.” Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 42 Norwood Public Schools
  43. 43. A caption describes or explains the illustration. Captions can be inside, beside, above or below the illustration. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 43 Norwood Public Schools
  44. 44. Bullets are placed before items in a list. They call the reader’s attention to each item. The heading of this fact box is bolded and placed in an orange color bar to call attention to it. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 44 Norwood Public Schools
  45. 45. The captions for each of these small illustrations on this page are in italics to distinguish them from the other text. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 45 Norwood Public Schools
  46. 46. The heading “Bone Facts” is typed in a RED band of color to get the reader’s attention. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 46 Norwood Public Schools
  47. 47. This diagram has labels for the parts of the rattlesnake’s mouth. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 47 Norwood Public Schools
  48. 48. This is a labeled diagram showing the parts of an ant’s body. This diagram has a caption in italics below it. The text has bolded words that would be found in the glossary. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 48 Norwood Public Schools
  49. 49. • Bolded letters call attention to the text. They tell the reader “Look at me! I am important.”• Italics also call attention to the text. They tell the reader “Look at me! I am different.” Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 49 Norwood Public Schools
  50. 50. Nonfiction books provide other important features that help the reader. These other features include: •Fact Boxes or Lists •Bibliographies •Website Lists •Copyright Date Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 50 Norwood Public Schools
  51. 51. Nonfiction books often provide extra facts in fact boxes throughout the chapters. This list has bullets in front of each item. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 51 Norwood Public Schools
  52. 52. Nonfiction books often provide lists of additional facts at the end of a chapter or at the end of the book. Sometimes they are in a box. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 52 Norwood Public Schools
  53. 53. This page contains two resource lists. The first is a bibliography of suggested books. The second is a list of suggested web sites to visit. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 53 Norwood Public Schools
  54. 54. This page contains: the Index, a bibliography of books, and a list of web sites. It also provides information about the authors. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 54 Norwood Public Schools
  55. 55. This page provides a list of organizations to contact, a bibliography of books and a list of websites. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 55 Norwood Public Schools
  56. 56. The copyright date tells the reader when the book was published. Copyright information is found on the back of the title page, or in the back of the book. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 56 Norwood Public Schools
  57. 57. • Nonfiction features help the reader to understand nonfiction books or magazine, newspaper and encyclopedia articles.• It is important that readers understand these features so they can use them purposefully in their reading every day. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 57 Norwood Public Schools
  58. 58. • Armentrout, David and Patricia. Chimpanzees. Vero Beach, FL: Rourke Publishing, 2008.• Bredeson, Carmen. Boa Constrictor’s Up Close. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, Inc., 2006.• Bredeson. Carmen. Giant Pandas Up Close. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, Inc., 2006.• Donald, Rhonda Lucas. Endangered Animals. NY: Scholastic Inc., 2001• Earle, Ann. Zipping, Zapping, Zooming Bats. NY: Harper Collins, 1995.• Gans, Roma. How Do Birds Find Their Way? NY: HarperCollinsPublishers, 1996.• Jenkins, Steve. Almost Gone: The World’s Rarest Animals. NY: HarperCollinsPublishers, 2006.• Kalman, Bobbie. Baby Apes. St. Catherines, Ontario: Crabtree Publishing Co., 2008.• Kendell, Patricia. Chimpanzees. Austin, TX: Raintree Steck-Vaughan Publishers, 2002.• Lauber, Patricia. Snakes Are Hunters. NY:Harper Collins Publishers, 1988.• Mattson, Mark. Scholastic Environmental Atlas of the United States. NY: Scholastic Inc, 1993.• O’Toole, Christopher. Discovering Ants. NY: The Bookwright Press, 1986.• Otto, Carolyn. What Color is Camouflage? NY: HarperCollins, 1996.• Parker, Steve. Eyewitness Books: Mammal. London: Dorling Kindersley Limited, 1989• Pyers, Greg. Ladybugs Up Close. Chicago: Raintree, 2005.• Rylant, Cynthia. The Journey: Stories of Migration. NY: Blue Sky Press Scholastic, 2006.• Walker, Sara. Big Cats. London: Dorling Kindersley Limited, 2002. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 58 Norwood Public Schools
  59. 59. • Kendall, Juli. Reading Workshop Journal. October 22, 2009. http://www.middleweb.com/ReadWrkshp/JK33.html• Stein, Barb et al. Reading Nonfiction Part 1. October 22, 2009. http://www.iowa-city.k12.ia.us/library/Curriculum/Lit/Lessons/ReadingNonfiction1.htm• Stein, Barb et al. Reading Nonfiction Part 2. October 22, 2009. http://www.iowa-city.k12.ia.us/library/Curriculum/Lit/Lessons/ReadingNonfiction2.htm• Huey, Raymond B., and W. Herbert Wilson, Jr. "Animal." World Book Student. World Book, 2009. Web. 2 Nov. 2009.• Means, D. Bruce. "Reptile." World Book Student. World Book, 2009. Web. 2 Nov. 2009. Mrs. Paula McMullen, Library Teacher,11/6/2009 59 Norwood Public Schools

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