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Week 2 reality tv institutions

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Week 2 reality tv institutions

  1. 1. Institutions Reality TV and the Television Industry Cartoon © Benrik Pitch
  2. 2. How popular is reality TV? <ul><li>Annette Hill: media theorist and expert in the rise of reality tv </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Reality TV is so popular across the public in Britain that sometimes more than half the population are watching one reality TV show.’ </li></ul>
  3. 3. A Week in Reality TV – an overview <ul><li>In a single week in January 2011: </li></ul><ul><li>– 41 different reality titles were broadcast on Freeview channels alone </li></ul><ul><li>– at least 12 of these programmes were screened daily </li></ul><ul><li>– a number were repeated in different time slots throughout the day. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Useful website <ul><li>http://www.tvguide.co.uk/ </li></ul>
  5. 5. How popular is reality TV?
  6. 6. <ul><li>Can you account for the rise in the popularity of Reality TV? </li></ul>
  7. 7. Reality Television is... <ul><li>A response to changes in technology and economic crisis in the world of broadcasting: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the arrival of TV for mass audiences in the US – and then the UK </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>lots of new programmes needed – and shows which involve the audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>new lightweight cameras create new types of documentary: the ‘real people on TV’ show is born </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>daytime TV launches in the UK – more programmes needed to fill the schedules! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>strikes and crises in the broadcasting industry lead to less drama, more ‘real people’ TV, from talk shows to docusoaps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the digital revolution begins! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>new satellite, cable and digital channels arrive! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the internet. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Why is the Reality genre popular with TV broadcasters?
  9. 9. Sub Genre example 1: The Reality Talent Show <ul><li>Format: </li></ul><ul><li>Competition – auditions, tension, conflict, skills development </li></ul><ul><li>A format – recognisable, familiar, same but different </li></ul><ul><li>Talent (or not) – entertainment and diversion – it’s fun! </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrity judges, real-life personal stories or journeys </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusiveness – anyone can enter </li></ul><ul><li>A long-term process building to a mega-event </li></ul><ul><li>A vote and a winner – resolution! </li></ul><ul><li>Examples : The X Factor , Britain’s Got Talent </li></ul><ul><li>Question: </li></ul><ul><li>why is this sub-genre popular with broadcasters? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Sub-genre example 2 :The Docusoap a hybrid of observational documentary and soap opera <ul><li>Format and Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Vets in Practice: narratives around vets, suffering pets, and their owners and the drama, highs and lows of the daily life of a veterinary practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Traffic Cops: motorway stories, seen from the point of view of the daily work of traffic police. Click for Traffic Cops </li></ul><ul><li>The Family : 28-camera set-up records the minutiae of everyday family life over 8 months. Massively edited into a highly constructed narrative. Series 1 observational with voiceover, focusing on small moments of family conflict set entirely within the home; Series 2 incorporates talking heads, interview and more continuing story strands, with external footage. Click for The Family (clip 1) ; Click for The Family (clip 2) . </li></ul><ul><li>Question: </li></ul><ul><li>: Why is this sub-genre popular with broadcasters? </li></ul>
  11. 11. Sub-Genre example 3: The Social Experiment Show <ul><li>Format and examples: </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘people experiment’ where a situation is set up and observed, e.g. Wife Swap – conflicting class values and life-styles within the home – exploring parenting, social relationships, domestic organisation, gender roles, work, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Blood Sweat and T-shirts – assumptions of affluent Western teens challenged through experience of harsh lives of other cultures. </li></ul><ul><li>Secret Millionaire – a social experiment with positive outcomes. </li></ul><ul><li>The Choir – encouraging participation; teaching boys to enjoy singing; uniting divided communities; mending ‘Broken Britain’ through song. </li></ul><ul><li>Question: </li></ul><ul><li>why is this sub-genre popular with broadcasters? </li></ul>
  12. 12. Sub-genre example 1: The Reality Talent Show <ul><li>Added value for the Broadcasters </li></ul><ul><li>long-running – occupies many hours of air-time, and builds to climax </li></ul><ul><li>endlessly recyclable format, which can be copyrighted </li></ul><ul><li>huge audiences, national profile, can generate massive tabloid promotion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lots of opportunities for spin-off programmes; The Xtra Factor etc </li></ul></ul><ul><li>can use celebrity judges already associated with the broadcaster’s ‘brand’ </li></ul><ul><li>generates a massive income for the channel via: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sponsorship from advertisers (I’m A Celebrity/Iceland) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>revenue from voting process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sales of advertising space/airtime – major family brands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>% of sales/profits made after the series is over (The X-Factor Tour, album etc) </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Sub-genre example 2 :The Docusoap a hybrid of observational documentary and soap opera <ul><li>Added value for Broadcasters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>after initial set-up, relatively cheap to produce </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no costs for screenwriters, actors are free, no need to build sets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ongoing ready-made drama, with inbuilt storylines, keeps audiences coming back </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>information content; opportunities for spin-off shows, viewer interaction, debate . </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Sub-genre example 3: The Social Experiment Show <ul><li>Added value for the Broadcasters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>usually a worthwhile socially useful mission – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>can be useful in promoting campaigns, charities, raising awareness of social issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>can change the way people think and behave towards each other </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>therefore good for the reputation of the producers/channel </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Added value for the Broadcasters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>relatively cheap to produce, no paid actors, no sets or just one set </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>long-running – occupies many hours of air-time, including spin-offs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>audience loyalty as the series builds to climax </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>endlessly recyclable format, which can be copyrighted and franchised globally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>huge audiences, national profile, can generate massive tabloid promotion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>generates a massive income for the channel via: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>sales of advertising space to major brands at prime-time </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>sponsorship from advertisers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>revenue from voting process </li></ul></ul></ul>Summary of benefits to the industry

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