APPENDIX: ADDRESS TO ARAB RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIESPublic Speech to the Association of Arab Red Cross and Red C...
Iraqi war. The principle of humanity requires the preservation of the humanitariannature of operations—i.e.,” to protect l...
livestock and thus preserve the human condition. Animal welfare professionals such asthe WSPA federation can help, creatin...
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance, who were supportive. I’d alsolike to invite those agencies as well...
Diplomacy and Negotiation for HumanitarianNGOs (Humanitarian Solutions in the 21stCentury) [Hardcover]Larry Winter Roeder ...
action for valuable insights into the negotiation process. These guidelines can be used as isor modified to suit specific ...
Speech on Animal Welfare to Arab Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
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Public Speech to the Association of Arab Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Tunis, Tunisia, March 23, 2008

PROTECTING ANIMALS FROM DISASTERS - A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON HUMANITARIAN RELIEF (Roeder, PROTECTING ANIMALS FROM DISASTERS - A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON HUMANITARIAN RELIEF, 2008)

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Larry Winter Roeder, Jr. MS, United Nations Affairs Director,
The World Society for the Protection of Animals.

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Speech on Animal Welfare to Arab Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

  1. 1. APPENDIX: ADDRESS TO ARAB RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIESPublic Speech to the Association of Arab Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies,Tunis, Tunisia, March 23, 2008PROTECTING ANIMALS FROM DISASTERS - A NEW PERSPECTIVE ONHUMANITARIAN RELIEF (Roeder, PROTECTING ANIMALS FROM DISASTERS - ANEW PERSPECTIVE ON HUMANITARIAN RELIEF, 2008)byLarry Winter Roeder, Jr. MS, United Nations Affairs Director,The World Society for the Protection of AnimalsMr. Secretary General, Dr. Al Hadid, Excellencies, I come to you today to propose anew partnership as a tool to improve how we do emergencies, namely throughstreamlining animal welfare with humanitarian relief. I also propose a formal workingrelationship between our network of 850 animal welfare NGOs known as the WorldSociety for the Protection of Animals or WSPA and your global movement, for ourmutual benefit.WSPA is the world’s largest animal welfare federation with a quarter century ofexperience in disasters and wars. Our alliance is made of NGOs going back to the 19thcentury. Today we are made up of over 850 NGOs, mostly in developing economies,which is a strength because like the Red Cross movement, we are very local.Personally, I also come with over 35 years as a humanitarian in conflicts and naturaldisasters. My experiences have certainly taught me the great value of your movement,with whom I’ve worked closely on such issues as the development of humanitarian lawbut also on specific emergencies like the Iraq conflict. Those same experiences, someas the former Policy Adviser on Disaster Management at the US Department of State,have shown time and again that it is a false decision to separate humanitarian relief andanimal welfare. Indeed, the poor way we usually handle animals in emergencies oftenendangers people not only during the crisis; but also in the recovery phase.Not getting animal welfare right increases poverty and stifles nutrition. It is also agender issue, a demographic sector of long time concern for all humanitarians. Todayin Darfur donkeys are the local trucks. If you over work them, beat them, mistreat them,they will carry less, even die. If a donkey dies in Darfur or is stolen, a woman or younggirl becomes the truck. Preserve the donkey and women are protected.As many have already noted, the mistakes of the Rwanda crisis caused a paradigmshift in how we looked at humanitarianism, certainly true as well with the advent of the
  2. 2. Iraqi war. The principle of humanity requires the preservation of the humanitariannature of operations—i.e.,” to protect life and ease suffering." But Excellences’,preserving humans is and must be more than simply protecting the physical person. Italso needs to be about protecting the person’s culture, food supply and means of aliving. As the Darfur example illustrates, practical animal welfare policy actually doesthat and in the context of risk reduction sets the stage for sustainable recovery. Thatlast point is something every disaster manager wants, not simply to rescue but also toset the stage for recovery and a bright future. Like my friend Peter Walker of theFeinstein International Famine Center at Tufts University, I am suggesting a reinventionof humanitarianism, “a doctrine that resonates across all cultures.”It is appropriate that I give this speech here. I was born in an Arab country, Lebanonand have lived often in Egypt and traveled long in Sudan, in Jordan and Palestine. Onlya few doors from this hotel is where my father first studied Arabic. Some of my bestfriends are the Alegat Bedouin of the Sinai, of whom I am an honorary member. Manyof the Alegat depend entirely on goats for a living, for nutrition, sometimes very nearunmapped land mines. In all of your countries are people like that. Take away theirgoats, horses, camels or poultry and they have nothing. Indeed, about a billion of theworld’s poorest people totally depend on animals for income, many more for food, socialstatus or cultural identification, as well as companionship and security.Recognizing these realities, experts from UNHCR, the High Commissioner forRefugees, FAO, the Food and Agricultural Organization, the OIE, OECD and many UNagencies formed a committee led by WSPA and UNESCO. Together, we drafted adocument on the need to protect animals in disasters. This document is in your briefingmaterial. The point here is that experts in the humanitarian disaster community see thebenefits of protecting animals. Our members are also working directly with UNagencies. As an example, one of our member societies, SPANA, provides freeveterinary care to working animals and educates children and owners on how to care forthem properly in places like Timbuktu. Recently UNHCR in Chad asked them to createa strategic plan for dealing with livestock in an emergency situation, as competition fornatural resources between the various human populations was resulting in livestockmanagement problems. SPANA also just completed a field trip to Eastern Chad, intowhich hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled from neighboring Darfur.What all of our member societies have seen time and again is that Disaster victims willoften protect their animals even to their own detriment. You have probably seen it aswell. Pakistan is a place where for many earthquake victims, losing animals is a trueeconomic catastrophe, enough so that families will share their limited rations with theirlivestock, even their shelter. That creates serious sanitation and nutrition issues, whichcould have been minimized if as a matter of policy, trained animal welfare professionalsentered the emergency alongside the UN and the Red Cross movement. In 1999 inIraq the agricultural sector was hit by the worst drought in 60 years -- decimating cattleand crops. Today as we speak, winter rains, which usually begin drenching the countryfrom October, have yet to arrive. Better use of land, sometimes better constructedboreholes, better training or perhaps choices of breeds of animals can reduce losses of
  3. 3. livestock and thus preserve the human condition. Animal welfare professionals such asthe WSPA federation can help, creating a foundation for both animals and people tothrive.What is needed to fully serve your clients is to streamline animal welfare intohumanitarian relief to mutual advantage. Indeed, streamlining must be seen as truehumanitarian assistance. This is why I come to you today, to formally offer apartnership bridging our community with yours so that the dream of Henry Dunant reallycan be met.WSPA proposes to work with you to develop a pilot project that proves my concept, onein which professional animal welfare bodies, some of whom operate right here in Tunis,would work right alongside of your workers. We also propose to work on a joint set ofpractical operational rules. The goal of this partnership is to truly uplift humanity at thesame time that we improve the lives of animals.Another example. In March 2003, WSPA launched a collaboration to provide freeveterinary care for working horses and donkeys in the southern Afghan city ofJalalabad. The project also included an education and training program. In that citythousands of people work with horses and donkeys and entire families depend on theseanimals for their livelihood. This collaboration reduced the death rate in Equines byover 80%. That’s real humanitarian relief because each horse we saved was the solesource of income for a poor family. No horse, no income. No income, no hope.I have been using disaster response examples but of course any professional disastermanager knows we must also advance preparedness and risk reduction. In Argentinaat the request of the then President of the Senate Commission on Livestock, wedeveloped a 2 year risk reduction pilot project for the province of Santa Fe in order toprotect cattle and therefore the cattle industry, affected by periodic flooding from theParana Complex (millions of hectares of lush, floodable pastures). We expect tocomplete that project this year. The local chapter of the Red Cross movement is alsolooking at our work as a model. This work was done not only WSPA itself but by localmember societies in cooperation with the Cavalry & Veterinary Division of theArgentinean Army.So how do we proceed next? We propose today a simple starting gate. First of all, inyour countries are people and animals are impacted by earthquakes, fires, droughts andarmed conflict. In addition, we know that there are risks for emerging diseases such asavian flu, which according to some experts is now endemic in Egypt.My good friend and yours Dr. Muhammed Al-Hadid has suggested we have a workshopin Amman this year to work out the mechanics of this streamlining partnership and apilot project in 2009, as well as begin the process of documenting best practices thatserve your interests. We also need to sort out the details of how we can integrateoperations. I recently had occasion to discuss this idea with senior staff at the WorldFood Program and the Food and Agriculture Organization, as well as OCHA, the UN
  4. 4. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance, who were supportive. I’d alsolike to invite those agencies as well InterAction, which represents all of the majorhumanitarian NGOs who have offices in the US. After all, we are talking about a grandpartnership that helps us all.I therefore recommend we all concur with Dr. Al-Hadid’s great recommendation and joinhim in Jordan for the workshop, to improve humanitarian work – the dream of HenryDunant, by streamlining animal welfare into humanitarian relief. We will bringourselves as co-chair and invite a small number of experts from some of our membersocieties that work in your countries.Working as a team, which is the best way to solve any problem, we will reduce risks forpeople and animals in your countries as well as reduce poverty and hunger, preserveculture and minimize the spread of disease.Thank you again for this great honor.Post Speech References on Springer.com and Amazon.comDiplomacy, Funding and AnimalWelfare [Hardcover]Larry Winter Roeder Jr. (Author)Book DescriptionPublication Date: August 9, 2011 | ISBN-10:3642212735 | ISBN-13: 978-3642212734 |Edition: 2011Diplomacy, Funding and Animal Welfare is apractical guide to the best diplomatic andnegotiation practices needed to convincegovernments and international institutions toeffectively protect animals, which alsointroduces new approaches tofundraising. Animal protection advocates areprepared for speaking to diplomats and government officials in any setting, and tocombatants in war zones. The book mainly focuses on approaching local and nationalgovernments, the United Nations system, the international Red Cross movement andsystems related to other international organizations that can help animals, often insurprising ways. The reader will learn the rules of “diplomatic protocol", and much aboutthe rules and procedures of major international bodies. To provide balance and real worldrelevance, the guide draws on a compilation of the author’s extensive activities across arange of development, animal welfare, emergency management and climate issues ingovernment and in the NGO world, as well as interviews with scholars and officials fromNGOs, diplomatic missions, the United Nations, the Red Cross, governments andcorporations.
  5. 5. Diplomacy and Negotiation for HumanitarianNGOs (Humanitarian Solutions in the 21stCentury) [Hardcover]Larry Winter Roeder Jr. (Author), Albert Simard (Author)Publication Date: May 31, 2013 | ISBN-10: 1461471125 | ISBN-13:978-1461471127 | Edition: 2013Diplomacy and Funding for Humanitarian Non-Profits is apractical guide to best practices in diplomacy andnegotiation for non-profits (NGOs) who work to convincegovernments and international institutions to effectivelyprotect humans through disaster assistance, sustainabledevelopment and the protection of cultures. Thevolume proposes a holistic approach to humanitarianassistance by integrating non-traditional and traditionalhumanitarian partners. Users of the book will be preparedto speak to diplomats and government officials in anysetting, including war zones. The book mainly focuses onapproaching local and national governments, the United Nations system, the internationalRed Cross movement and other international organizations. The reader will learn the rulesof “diplomatic protocol", and much about the rules and procedures of major internationalbodies, as well as how to leverage media and knowledge management for planning,establishing, and managing a humanitarian initiative. To provide balance and real worldrelevance, the guide draws on a compilation of the extensive activities of both authorsacross a range of development, emergency management, knowledge management, andclimate issues in government and in the NGO world, as well as interviews with a broadrange of scholars and officials from NGOs, diplomatic missions, the media, the UnitedNations, the Red Cross, governments and corporations.Editorial ReviewsThe history of diplomacy is littered with false starts, misread intentions, and cultural fauxpas; yet refugees can’t be helped, nor international rules created or implemented withoutdiplomacy. In addition, governments can’t do it all. In the 21st century, non-governmentalorganizations (NGOs) are at the forefront of global efforts for peace, social justice, andenvironmental reform. Success for todays NGO requires balancing long-term strategiesand goals with day-to-day and even moment-to-moment issues--much of this taking placeacross the negotiation table from representatives from governments and internationalorganizations such as the United Nations or armed non-state actors. Diplomacy andNegotiation for Humanitarian NGOs presents a richly detailed practical guide for modernNGO diplomacy and negotiation. Its clearly developed steps, from team building to decisionmaking and coalition building to cultural awareness, suggest opportunities for expanding thework of NGOs in creating positive outcomes. Instructive cases from the past and usefulillustrations from current times offer success stories, warn of pitfalls, and describe skills in
  6. 6. action for valuable insights into the negotiation process. These guidelines can be used as isor modified to suit specific situations, or stakeholders. Chapters focus on key areas suchas: The roles of NGOs in war and peace. Information and knowledge management.Security, risk analysis, and intelligence. International funding. Legal matters, includinginternational humanitarian law. Public Diplomacy, Communications and interacting with themedia. Protocol, from letter formats and formal meetings to social events. InternationalConferences as a tool for policy development. Many case studies, including several fullchapters on specific examples of how NGO diplomacy has helped shape the world we livein.Ably bridging possibility and pragmatism, Diplomacy and Negotiation for HumanitarianNGOs is a uniquely vital resource for professionals in humanitarian relief and internationaldevelopment in non-profits, governments at all levels, the UN, and the Red Cross system.Indeed all types of civil society organizations can benefit from this book.About the AuthorLarry Roeder, MS. Consultant on Humanitarian Relief, Economic Development and Counter-Terrorism; Former Policy Adviser on Disaster Management, US Department of State; FormerExecutive Director, GDIN, the Global Disaster Information Network. Dr. Albert Simard, PhD.Is currently serving as Knowledge Manager at Defense Research & Development, Canada.He was a Board Member for GDIN, the Global Disaster Information Network and hasdeveloped national information systems for disaster management throughout most of hiscareer.

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