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How can teachers create an effective literate environment for the beginning reader in the 21st Century? Pam Egolf EDUC6706...
An environment… <ul><li>which develops students’ skills as speakers, listeners, readers and writers. </li></ul><ul><li>tha...
There are three essential aspects to consider when creating an effective  literate learning environment: <ul><li>Getting t...
Getting to Know Your Students as Literacy Learners:  Affective Aspect <ul><li>Take the time to discover your students’ </l...
Getting to Know Your Students as Literacy Learners: Cognitive Aspect <ul><li>Take the time to discover your students’ </li...
Selecting Appropriate and  Engaging Texts  <ul><li>Teachers are responsible to create literate environment that is balance...
How do we go about balancing texts?  <ul><li>Make sure you are including texts from all four quadrants of the  Literacy Ma...
Planning Instruction from 3 Perspectives <ul><li>Interactive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching students to be strategic reade...
Interactive Perspective <ul><li>Teach students how and when to use strategies (thinking while they read) that will help th...
Critical Perspective <ul><li>It is important to teach students how to critically question, examine, judge, and evaluate te...
Response Perspective <ul><li>It is important to give students opportunities to discover the transforming power of texts by...
Conclusion <ul><li>Creating and maintaining a literate classroom environment will influence students learning and provide ...
References <ul><li>Afflerbach, P., Pearson, P. D., & Paris, S. G. (2008). Clarifying differences between reading skills an...
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Literate Environment Presentation

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Literate Environment Presentation

  1. 1. How can teachers create an effective literate environment for the beginning reader in the 21st Century? Pam Egolf EDUC6706: The Beginning Reader, PreK-3 Walden University Instructor: Cindee Easton, M. ED.
  2. 2. An environment… <ul><li>which develops students’ skills as speakers, listeners, readers and writers. </li></ul><ul><li>that is rich in language and print. </li></ul><ul><li>that ensures all students, regardless of their cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic diversity achieve their full potential as literacy learners. </li></ul>
  3. 3. There are three essential aspects to consider when creating an effective literate learning environment: <ul><li>Getting to Know your students as literacy learners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Affective aspect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cognitive aspect </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Selecting appropriate and engaging texts </li></ul><ul><li>Using research based instructional practices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From an interactive prospective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From a critical perspective </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From a responsive perspective </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Getting to Know Your Students as Literacy Learners: Affective Aspect <ul><li>Take the time to discover your students’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interests </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attitudes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do we go about finding out this important information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interest games such as “Me Stew,” or “All About Me” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation to Read Profile Conversational Interview (Gambrell, Palmer, Codling & Mazzoni, 1996) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (McKenna & Kear, 1990) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk to your students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask questions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What do you do with the information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan literacy experiences around students’ interests </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Getting to Know Your Students as Literacy Learners: Cognitive Aspect <ul><li>Take the time to discover your students’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Functional level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In terms of students independent, instructional, and frustration levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developmental level </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In terms of students’ stages of reading and writing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do we go about finding out this important information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Running Records </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading Inventories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sight word assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spelling Inventory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comprehension checks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Writing samples </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What do you do with the information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use as a guide to plan developmentally appropriate literature experiences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organize students for small group instruction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide individualized instruct based on strengths and weaknesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Modify or maintain instruction </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Selecting Appropriate and Engaging Texts <ul><li>Teachers are responsible to create literate environment that is balanced and includes a full representation of texts that match students’ interests and learning needs. </li></ul>
  7. 7. How do we go about balancing texts? <ul><li>Make sure you are including texts from all four quadrants of the Literacy Matrix (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Linguistic (words) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Narrative (stories) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informational (nonfiction) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Students should be exposed to a great deal of informational texts from an early age and need to be taught the critical skills and strategies required for reading such text (large Informational texts in the Early years). </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Semiotic (pictures, icons, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Take into consideration the dimension of difficulty when selecting texts including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sentence length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of sentences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of syllables </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Concept density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sigletons (unique new words) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text length </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poetic Structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Size of print </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual supports </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Planning Instruction from 3 Perspectives <ul><li>Interactive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching students to be strategic readers, writers, and thinkers. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Critical </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching students how to judge, evaluate, and think critically about texts. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Response </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide opportunities for students to react and formulate a personal response to text. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Interactive Perspective <ul><li>Teach students how and when to use strategies (thinking while they read) that will help them learn to read and write accurately, fluently, and with comprehension across the key components of literacy development </li></ul><ul><li>Phonemic Awareness Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blend and segment words </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Phonics Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sound it out </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Decode by analogy (word families) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apply phonics rules </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fluency Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn high frequency words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repeated readings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Vocabulary Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use content clues (pictures) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyze word parts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Check a dictionary </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comprehension Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activate Background knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make connections to self or texts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make predictions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw inferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask I wonder questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Monitor for understanding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create mental images </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Summarize (Tompkins, 2008) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Teaching how and why to use strategies allows young learners take responsibility for their own literate learning (Afflerbach, Pearson & Paris, 2008). </li></ul>
  10. 10. Critical Perspective <ul><li>It is important to teach students how to critically question, examine, judge, and evaluate texts for validity and meaning (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b). </li></ul><ul><li>Question… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who created the text? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What perspective does the author have? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does the author have a lesson or message for the reader? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did the author include certain characters in the story? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What would the message be if we took it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>from a different perspective? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is my perspective? </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Response Perspective <ul><li>It is important to give students opportunities to discover the transforming power of texts by providing literacy experiences that will affect them on a personal and emotional level (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010). </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage students to respond to text by… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Holding class discussions and sharing each others thoughts and feelings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Written response or journaling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dramatic respose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Artistic response </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dr. Almasi (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b) states, “The response perspective supports students as they engage with texts in life changing ways.” </li></ul>
  12. 12. Conclusion <ul><li>Creating and maintaining a literate classroom environment will influence students learning and provide a means to develop students into competent, motivated life long readers, writers, and thinkers. </li></ul>
  13. 13. References <ul><li>Afflerbach, P., Pearson, P. D., & Paris, S. G. (2008). Clarifying differences between reading skills and reading strategies.  The Reading Teacher, 61 (5), 364–373. </li></ul><ul><li>Gambrell, L. B., Palmer, B. M., Codling, R. M., & Mazzoni, S. A. (1996). Assessing motivation to read. The Reading Teacher 49 (7), 518–533. </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010a). Analyzing and selecting texts [DVD]. Enhancing The Beginning ReaderPreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010b). Critical perspective [DVD]. Enhancing The Beginning ReaderPreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author </li></ul><ul><li>Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2010c). Response perspective [DVD]. Enhancing The Beginning ReaderPreK-3. Baltimore, MD: Author </li></ul><ul><li>McKenna, M. C., & Kear, D. J. (1990). Measuring attitude toward reading: A new tool for teachers. The Reading Teacher, 43 (9), 626–639. </li></ul><ul><li>Tompkins, G. E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: A balances approach (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. </li></ul>

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