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  1. 1. Session Introduction:Understanding and Using Your SOCIAL STYLEsm © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  2. 2. Objectives © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. Objectives• Gain a working understanding of the SOCIAL STYLE Model™ © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. Objectives• Gain a working understanding of the SOCIAL STYLE Model™• Determine your SOCIAL STYLE by completing a Self-Perception questionnaire © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. Objectives• Gain a working understanding of the SOCIAL STYLE Model™• Determine your SOCIAL STYLE by completing a Self-Perception questionnaire• Increase your understanding of your behavior and how others tend to view people with your Style © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6. Objectives• Gain a working understanding of the SOCIAL STYLE Model™• Determine your SOCIAL STYLE by completing a Self-Perception questionnaire• Increase your understanding of your behavior and how others tend to view people with your Style• Learn some ways to use your SOCIAL STYLE in order to be more productive with others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7. Behavior & PersonalityObservable Behavior Say/Do Personality © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8. Behavior & Personality• Behavior — What you say (verbal) and do (non-verbal) Observable Behavior Say/Do Personality © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9. Behavior & Personality• Behavior — What you say (verbal) and do (non-verbal)• Interpersonal Behavior — What you say and do when interacting with one or more people Observable Behavior Say/Do Personality © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10. Behavior & Personality• Behavior — What you say • SOCIAL STYLE— A (verbal) and do (non-verbal) particular pattern of actions• Interpersonal Behavior — that others can observe and What you say and do when agree upon for describing interacting with one or more one’s behavior people Observable Behavior Say/Do Personality © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11. Behavior & Personality• Behavior — What you say • SOCIAL STYLE— A (verbal) and do (non-verbal) particular pattern of actions• Interpersonal Behavior — that others can observe and What you say and do when agree upon for describing interacting with one or more one’s behavior people • Personality — The combination of ideas, values, hopes, dreams, attitudes, abilities, as well as the behavior that others can Observable observe that encompasses Behavior everything a person is Say/Do Personality © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12. Observable BehaviorsObservable Behavior © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13. Observable Behaviors Observable Traits Behavior Judgments Honest I like him. Intelligent He annoys me. Arrogant She interests me. Motivated He irritates me.Self-Centered Say I distrust her. Sincere Do I hate him. Critical I trust him. Quiet — Loud Slower-paced — Faster-paced Facially controlled — Facially animated Monotone voice — Inflected voice Indirect eye contact — Direct eye contact Casual posture — Rigid posture © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14. Assertiveness Asks Tells A dimension of behavior that measures thedegree to which others perceive a person as tending to ask or tell in interactions with others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15. ResponsivenessControls A dimension of behavior that measures the degree to which others perceive a person as tending to control or display his or her feelings and emotions when interactingEmotes © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16. SOCIAL STYLE Model ControlsAsks Tells Emotes © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17. SOCIAL STYLE Model Controls Driving Style More Controlling + More TellingAsks Tells Emotes © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18. SOCIAL STYLE Model Controls Driving Style More Controlling + More TellingAsks Tells Expressive Style More Emoting + Emotes More Telling © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19. SOCIAL STYLE Model Controls Driving Style More Controlling + More Telling Asks TellsAmiable Style Expressive StyleMore Emoting More Emoting + + Emotes More Asking More Telling © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  20. 20. SOCIAL STYLE Model ControlsAnalytical Style Driving StyleMore Controlling More Controlling + + More Asking More Telling Asks TellsAmiable Style Expressive StyleMore Emoting More Emoting + + Emotes More Asking More Telling © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  21. 21. Your SOCIAL STYLE Self-Perception EXAMPLE:• Tear open the perforation C• Transfer response for each question Analytical Driving• Add up column totals A T• Plot your SOCIAL STYLE Amiable Expressive E © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  22. 22. Your SOCIAL STYLE Self-Perception EXAMPLE:• Tear open the perforation C• Transfer response for each question Analytical Driving• Add up column totals A T• Plot your SOCIAL STYLE Amiable Expressive E Remember, your self-perception may differ from others’ views! © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  23. 23. Key Reminders © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  24. 24. Key Reminders• There is no best SOCIAL STYLE position © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  25. 25. Key Reminders• There is no best SOCIAL STYLE position• Your Style is not your whole personality © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  26. 26. Key Reminders• There is no best SOCIAL STYLE position• Your Style is not your whole personality• Your Style Profile represents a theme in your performance © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  27. 27. Key Reminders• There is no best SOCIAL STYLE position• Your Style is not your whole personality• Your Style Profile represents a theme in your performance• Your Style has growth actions © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  28. 28. Key Reminders• There is no best SOCIAL STYLE position• Your Style is not your whole personality• Your Style Profile represents a theme in your performance• Your Style has growth actions• Your challenge: Take the initiative to establish and build effective relationships with others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  29. 29. Improving YourEffectiveness with Others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  30. 30. Improving Your Effectiveness with OthersKnow Yourself: Know the impressionyou make on others, how your behavioralpreferences can cause tension for others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  31. 31. Improving Your Effectiveness with OthersControl Yourself: Learn to be tolerant of others’behavior without becoming tenseKnow Yourself: Know the impressionyou make on others, how your behavioralpreferences can cause tension for others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  32. 32. Improving Your Effectiveness with OthersKnow Others: Observe others behaviors to learn about theirtension levels, how they respond to your messages, and what youcan do to make the interaction more comfortable and effectiveControl Yourself: Learn to be tolerant of others’behavior without becoming tenseKnow Yourself: Know the impressionyou make on others, how your behavioralpreferences can cause tension for others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  33. 33. Improving Your Effectiveness with OthersDo Something for Others: Once you know what makes anotherperson comfortable, try to accommodate his/her preferencesKnow Others: Observe others behaviors to learn about theirtension levels, how they respond to your messages, and what youcan do to make the interaction more comfortable and effectiveControl Yourself: Learn to be tolerant of others’behavior without becoming tenseKnow Yourself: Know the impressionyou make on others, how your behavioralpreferences can cause tension for others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  34. 34. Versatility Behaviors Behaviors Seen as Seen as Focusing on Focusing on My Tension Others’ Tension Low High Versatility VersatilityVersatility — An overall measure of the effect your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback have on others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  35. 35. Your Versatility Self-Perception• Tear open the perforation If 7 of less=Low (circle the “L”)• Add up the check marks in If 8-14= Medium (circle the “M”) the shaded column If 15-21=High (circle the “H”)• Circle the letter of your Versatility score L M H © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  36. 36. Your Versatility Self-Perception EXAMPLE:• Tear open the perforation If 7 of less=Low (circle the “L”)• Add up the check marks in If 8-14= Medium (circle the “M”) the shaded column If 15-21=High (circle the “H”)• Circle the letter of your Versatility score L M H © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  37. 37. Your Versatility Self-Perception EXAMPLE:• Tear open the perforation If 7 of less=Low (circle the “L”)• Add up the check marks in If 8-14= Medium (circle the “M”) the shaded column If 15-21=High (circle the “H”)• Circle the letter of your Versatility score L M H Remember, your self-perception may differ from others’ views! © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  38. 38. Do Something for Others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  39. 39. Identifying the Facilitator’s Style• Purpose: To give you practice in identifying Styles• Directions: – Read the Skills Guide Cards and identify the facilitator’s Style – Identify at least two behaviors along each scale that the facilitator has exhibited in class to support your conclusion © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  40. 40. Style Observation Rules1. Avoid trying to define a If you force Style identification too quickly, you might create a Style too quickly. self-fulfilling prophecy. Use a suspended reaction to confirm the validity of observations. Avoid taking sides in an interaction: hang back, get out of the picture as much as possible.2. Get out of the way. Don’t let your feelings interfere. Concentrate on how the other person is acting. Give people a “second chance” to display more behavior.3. Avoid early “good,” “bad,” Describe a person’s actions objectively, in a way that others can or “why” judgments. readily agree. For example, the observation that “Charlie sat quietly during the meeting and had an expressionless face” can quickly be verified or denied.4. Separate Style clues from Conclusions based on a person’s role are not necessarily true assigned authority or role. (e.g., all competitive football players have a Driving Style).5. Observe others under Watch people “snap back” to old habits when the situation is moderate stress to clarify uncomfortable, and you will be able to make a more accurate their Style. observation.6. Set the stage for the If someone is busy reacting to you and your Style, you will find it person being observed. very difficult to observe that person’s Style. Give people a chance to show their Styles by allowing them time to display their natural behaviors. © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  41. 41. Style Forum• Purpose: To give you an opportunity to describe what it is about the opposite SOCIAL STYLE position that creates tension for you and to develop insights into how to be more productive with a person who has that Style• Directions: – In your assigned group discuss and develop a list of behaviors that the opposite SOCIAL STYLE exhibits that creates tension for you – Share your list with the group of the opposite Style – In your group discuss what you can do to interact better with the opposite Style – Share your information with the opposite Style and the whole class © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  42. 42. Developing Actions Toward Others Using the IPEV Guide• Purpose: To learn about Style preferences as they relate to the ABCs of Style and to develop an actionable list to improve an interpersonal relationship• Directions: – Think of a person you work with. What is their likely Style? – Read about their ABCs of the Style: Analytical Style: Pages 11-13 Driving Style: Pages 5-6 Amiable Style: Pages 9-10 Expressive Style: Pages 7-8• List specific actions you can take to improve your relationship with this person in each of the ABC areas• In your group, discuss and fine tune your action items• Use your action list when you return to work © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  43. 43. Developing Actions Toward Others Using the Style Dial• Purpose: To provide you with a tool for applying Style concepts at work• Directions – Think of a person your work with. What is their likely Style? – Review the Style Dial position of that person – Ask your facilitator any questions that you have about the information on the Style Dial – List four to five actions that you can take to improve your relationship with this person – Discuss and fine-tune your action items with members of your Style group © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  44. 44. Strategies for Doing Something for Others• Purpose: To provide you with specific strategies for improving your interactions with others• Directions: – Think of a person you work with. What is their likely Style? – Read the “Strategies for Doing Something for Others” handout – List four or five actions you can take to improve your relationship with this person – Discuss and fine-tune your action items with members of your group © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  45. 45. Do Unto Others— Accepts/Rejects Card• Purpose: To help develop your skills in interacting with people with a Style diagonally opposite to yours• Directions: – Review the “Do Unto Others – Accepts/Rejects Guide” card – In your group: Assume that your group needs to convince a co-worker who has a Style diagonally opposite to your own to participate in designing a new company-wide program for acknowledging the contributions of outstanding employees (e.g., Driving Styles would imagine convincing Amiable Styles) – Use the Accepts/Rejects Guide card to determine how they would approach this co-worker and discuss – Have the diagonally opposite Style evaluate your group’s solution © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.
  46. 46. Self-Assessment of Your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback• Purpose: To help you better understand your current use of Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback and how that might affect your Versatility score• Directions – Read pages 20-24 in your Self-Perception Guide and answer the questions for each of the four components of Versatility – Cite and discuss ways that you identified for improving your Image, Presentation, Competence, and Feedback – Add to the notes in your Self-Perception Guide good ideas mentioned by others © TRACOM GROUP. All Rights Reserved.

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