with Dante CuevasAdapted from the talk“Music for pronunciation”given on June 29th 2012Speaker’s notes are in pink
• The nature of English sounds• The pronunciation benefits of music• Examples of music activities that enhance     pronunc...
How would you pronounce                                the following word?                            Without prior refere...
The English language was first written inthe Anglo-Saxon Futhorc runic alphabet, later(circa 7th century AD) the Roman alp...
With this all this complexity in the English language how can we aid our students towards great pronunciation?
In a study done by the University of Minnesota with 71 secondary    students, 2 groups were studied, one group had previou...
A study done by the University of Reading with adult L2 learners revealed a numerical correlation between the ability to p...
In another study done by AppalachianState University, a positive correlationwas found between:                 Pitch perce...
• Less pronunciation mistakes• Easier ability to detect the vocal subtleties• Easier to imitate natural intonation
•   The prince of Paris•   Musical Puzzles•   Limericks•   Educational rap      Because English has such a diverse phoneti...
The Prince of Paris lost his hatSome say this and some say thatI say you Sir       Here is a game that helps with         ...
A canner exceedingly cannyOne morning remarked to his granny:         “A canner can can        Any thing that he canBut a ...
Our novels get longa and longa  Their language gets stronga  and stronga  There’s much to be said                A wonderf...
These songs are a recent  find that I wanted to  share because they are  great for developing  proper diction.
“Rapping “ imposes a set of conditions on• Songs                                                   the brain that fuse the...
To reap full phonetic benefits from  music, regular use is required. One  effective way is to incorporate it into  your wa...
English lacks an across-the-board phonetic structureMusic can:• ease and facilitate pronunciation woes• enliven your class...
Many thanks for stopping by, feel free to check out moreinteresting content freely available on this site.I would love to ...
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Music for pronunciation

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Why is English pronunciation so difficult to pin down for EFL students? This presentation is designed to explain the phonetic irregularities inherent in English this is and to demonstrate how musical activities can aid pronunciation woes in the classroom.

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Music for pronunciation

  1. with Dante CuevasAdapted from the talk“Music for pronunciation”given on June 29th 2012Speaker’s notes are in pink
  2. • The nature of English sounds• The pronunciation benefits of music• Examples of music activities that enhance pronunciation
  3. How would you pronounce the following word? Without prior reference it is often difficult to tell how to pronounce a new word . “It’s unfortunate that dark cars always become inanimate.”As you can tell by reading the sentence above out loud, the English language is riddled withphonetic anomalies like connected sounds, reduced sounds as well as a multitude of voweland consonant variations that can leave L2 learners puzzled when trying to figure out thecorrect pronunciation of a new word. In comparison with other languages (like Spanish)English pronunciation is difficult and inconsistent. Why is this so?
  4. The English language was first written inthe Anglo-Saxon Futhorc runic alphabet, later(circa 7th century AD) the Roman alphabet wasadopted and over centuries all the originalcharacters ended up being absorbed andreplaced by Latin script. This creates the basis for English’s phonetic inconsistency for in adapting a Germanic tongue into a Latin alphabet all sorts of phonetic maneuvers were required that left English without the benefit of across-the-board pronunciation rules. To further complicate things, the English language was subsequently further enriched by the Old Norse and Old Norman (French dialect) languages to make it a truly eclectic tongue. Image taken from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/interactive/timelines/british/index.shtml
  5. With this all this complexity in the English language how can we aid our students towards great pronunciation?
  6. In a study done by the University of Minnesota with 71 secondary students, 2 groups were studied, one group had previous musical training the other did not. The group with musical training showed significantly less production and discrimination mistakes.
  7. A study done by the University of Reading with adult L2 learners revealed a numerical correlation between the ability to perceive:• Musical rhythm & Intonation• Musical Pitch & Phonetic Pitch• Note duration & Vowel lengthening/shortening
  8. In another study done by AppalachianState University, a positive correlationwas found between: Pitch perception and good pronunciation.
  9. • Less pronunciation mistakes• Easier ability to detect the vocal subtleties• Easier to imitate natural intonation
  10. • The prince of Paris• Musical Puzzles• Limericks• Educational rap Because English has such a diverse phonetic history, it is important to reinforce pronunciation with music, for in English music we can naturally find intonation structures as well as all the other phonetic variables so important to proper pronunciation. We will now go over some particularly effective pronunciation enhancing activities.
  11. The Prince of Paris lost his hatSome say this and some say thatI say you Sir Here is a game that helps with intonationWho Sir me Sir?Yes Sir you SirNo Sir not I SirWho Sir then Sir?
  12. A canner exceedingly cannyOne morning remarked to his granny: “A canner can can Any thing that he canBut a canner can’t can a can, can he?” Carolyn Wells Limericks provide a great, rhythm-based platform for pronunciation development
  13. Our novels get longa and longa Their language gets stronga and stronga There’s much to be said A wonderful bird is the For a life that is led pelican In illiterate places like Bonga His bill can hold more than H. G. Wells his belican He can take in his beak Food enough for a week But I’m damned if I see how the helican My firm belief is, that Pizarro Dixon Merritt Received education at Harrow - This alone would suffice, Funny limericks work well To account for his vice, in the classroom And his views superstitiously narrow. Aldous Huxley
  14. These songs are a recent find that I wanted to share because they are great for developing proper diction.
  15. “Rapping “ imposes a set of conditions on• Songs the brain that fuse the linguistic, the musical and the creative aspects of language.• Freestyle This activity allows for vital language circuits to be built that greatly aid with intonation and delivery. Use educational rap videos, let your students write their own raps or even let them “freestyle” (improvised rap off of a beat).Class idea: Have students (in groups or alone) write theirown raps on a class-relevant topic and put on adef talent show!
  16. To reap full phonetic benefits from music, regular use is required. One effective way is to incorporate it into your warm up.• Daily warm-up practice This is just a great way to start a class because you get your students into an entirely different state, you warm up their English- pronunciation muscles and you get their linguistic circuits going as well!
  17. English lacks an across-the-board phonetic structureMusic can:• ease and facilitate pronunciation woes• enliven your classes and• develop your students’ mental-language circuits in novel ways.
  18. Many thanks for stopping by, feel free to check out moreinteresting content freely available on this site.I would love to hear any comments or ideas you may haverelated to this topic, to comment just look below! http://languagenow.net

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