Women in engineering luncheon presentation at CASE 2013 (IEEE conference on automation science & engineering)

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Laura McLay's women in engineering luncheon presentation at CASE 2013 (IEEE conference on automation science & engineering)

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Women in engineering luncheon presentation at CASE 2013 (IEEE conference on automation science & engineering)

  1. 1. FIVE  OBSERVATIONS  ABOUT   WOMEN  IN  ENGINEERING       9TH  INTERNATIONAL  CONFERENCE  ON   AUTOMATION  SCIENCE  AND  ENGINEERING     LAURA  MCLAY,  PHD   Associate  Professor   Industrial  &  Systems  Engineering   University  of  Wisconsin-­‐Madison   lmclay@wisc.edu   @lauramclay  on  twitter    http://punkrockOR.wordpress.com  
  2. 2. INFORMS   Forum  for  Women  in  Operations  Research   and  the  Management  Sciences  (WORMS)   •  https://www.informs.org/Community/WORMS   •  @INFORMS_WORMS  on  twitter   •  Women  in  INFORMS  are  not  automatically  members   •  Please  invite  your  women  students  and  colleagues  to  join   •  Luncheon  and  cluster  of  talks  at  the  INFORMS  Annual   Meeting  in  Minneapolis,  October  6-­‐9,  2013.   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   2  
  3. 3. OBSERVATION  1:   WOMEN  ARE  GETTING   ENGINEERING  DEGREES     Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   3  
  4. 4. Women:  proportion  of  all  engineering   bachelor’s  degrees   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   4   0.0   5.0   10.0   15.0   20.0   25.0   30.0   35.0   40.0   45.0   Women  as  a  percentage  of  all  bachelor's  recipients   Math/CS   Engineering  
  5. 5. Women:  proportion  of  all  engineering   MS  degrees   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   5   0.0   5.0   10.0   15.0   20.0   25.0   30.0   35.0   40.0   Women  as  a  proportion  of  all  bachelor's  recipients   Math/CS   Engineering  
  6. 6. Women:  proportion  of  all  engineering   PhD  degrees   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   6   0.0   5.0   10.0   15.0   20.0   25.0   30.0   Women  as  a  percentage  of  all  PhD  recipients   Math/CS   Engineering  
  7. 7. OBSERVATION  2:   WOMEN  PHDS  ARE   MORE  LIKELY  TO  GO   INTO  ACADEMIA   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   7  
  8. 8. Where  new  PhDs  are  employed  according   to  gender  across  all  fields  (2010)   *  among  those  who  have  jobs  when  they  graduate   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   8       Engineering   Physical  Sciences   (including  math/CS)   Type  of  Job   Men   Women   Men   Women   Academe   19.6%   23.2%   34.1%   44.1%   Government   12.9%   12.0%   9.4%   10.6%   Industry   62.1%   58.2%   51.1%   37.4%   Not  for  Profit   3.1%   3.7%   2.8%   2.5%   Other   2.4%   2.4%   2.5%   5.4%   http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/sed/data_table.cfm  
  9. 9. OBSERVATION  3:   WOMEN  DROP  OUT  OF   ENGINEERING   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   9  
  10. 10. Women  in  the  workforce   As  a  percentage  of  all  employees  in  certain  sectors   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   10   0%   5%   10%   15%   20%   25%   30%   35%   1983   1988   1993   1998   2003   2008   Percentage  of  women  in  the  workforce   Mathematical  or  computer  scientist   Engineer   10.6%  in  2009  
  11. 11. A  majority  male  environment   leads  women  to  leave  engineering   •  “Women  actually  don’t  leave  jobs  in  science  at  an  above   average  rate.  The  difference…comes  from  the  engineering   sector.”   •  NSF  data  from  more  than  200,000  people  1993  –  2003   •  Hunt,  J.  (2010).  Why  do  women  leave  science  and   engineering?  (No.  w15853).  National  Bureau  of  Economic   Research.   http://punkrockor.wordpress.com/2011/10/28/five-­‐articles-­‐about-­‐women-­‐and-­‐engineering/       Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   11  
  12. 12. Another  study  implicated  the  majority   male  environment  in  engineering   •  Women  surveyed  who  left  engineering  cited  working   conditions  and  issues  such  as  a  lack  of  career  advancement,   low  salary,  condescending/patronizing  tones   •  Many  women  did  not  enter  engineering  after  graduation  due   to  a  poor  perception  of  the  culture  of  the  field   •  http://studyofwork.com/  by  UW-­‐Milwaukee   http://punkrockor.wordpress.com/2011/10/28/five-­‐articles-­‐about-­‐women-­‐and-­‐engineering/     Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   12  
  13. 13. OBSERVATION  4:     BUT  WOMEN  HAVE  A   WONDERFUL  HISTORY   IN  ENGINEERING  &   COMPUTING   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   13  
  14. 14. The  first  supercomputer  was   powered  by  women   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   14   The  original  programmers  of  ENIAC   computer  were  women.  When  the  U.S.   Army  introduced  the  ENIAC  to  the   public,  it  introduced  the  male  inventors,   but  it  never  introduced  the  female   programmers.  The  women  have  been   inducted  into  the  Women  in  Technology   International  Hall  of  Fame.       http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/12_things_you_didn %E2%80%99t_know_about_eniac     http://punkrockor.wordpress.com/2011/03/03/the-­‐first-­‐ supercomputer-­‐was-­‐powered-­‐by-­‐women/    
  15. 15. Retro  computing   pictures     Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   15   Colossus  1944   IBM  NORC  1954   http://royal.pingdom.com/2009/12/11/ retro-­‐delight-­‐gallery-­‐of-­‐early-­‐ computers-­‐1940s-­‐1960s/       Honeywell  200,  1963  
  16. 16. Bell  Labs  in  the  late  1960s   Courtesy  of  Larry  Luckham’s  delightful  website:   http://www.luckham.org/LHL.Bell%20Labs%20Days.html     Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   16  
  17. 17. Cosmopolitan   magazine   •  1967  feature  story  on   women  computer   programmers   •  Programming  is  just   like  “planning  a  dinner”   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   17   http://blog.fogcreek.com/girls-­‐go-­‐geek-­‐again/    
  18. 18. And  more  recently…   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   18  
  19. 19. OBSERVATION  5:   WOMEN  NEED   ADVOCATES,  NOT   JUST  MENTORS   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   19  
  20. 20. Women  engineers  need  advocates:   How  to  increase  the  visibility  of  women  researchers   •  Have  at  least  one  female  plenary  speaker  if  you  are  organizing  a   conference.   •  Nominate  females  for  professional  recognitions  –  from  students  to   senior  colleagues.   •  Invite  female  researchers  to  speak  at  your  campuses.   •  Publicize  the  successes  of  the  accomplishments  of  females  in   newsletters,  media,  press  releases,  etc.   •  Nominate  females  for  professional  society  offices.   •  Appoint  females  to  journal  editorial  boards.     •  And,  when  someone  achieves,  send  a  congratulatory  note  (a  great   idea  for  both  male  and  female  colleagues)   http://annanagurney.blogspot.com/2013/05/be-­‐advocate-­‐for-­‐female-­‐researchers.html   Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   20  
  21. 21. Thank  you!   My  contact  information:   •  lmclay@wisc.edu   •  @lauramclay  on  twitter   •  Today’s  slides  are  posted  on  my  blog:   http://punkrockOR.wordpress.com     Laura  McLay,  CASE  Conference  2013   21   Three  future  women  in  engineering?  

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