Asian Weddings

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Asian Weddings

  1. 1. Asian Weddings
  2. 2. Japanese Weddings Spring and autumn are the favourite seasons for Japanese weddings. On certain days, which are considered auspicious in the Japanese almanac, there may be as many as forty couples united in Japanese weddings at a Shinto shrine.
  3. 3.   Traditional bridal hairstyle “ katsura” The Katsura ceremonial wig is part of Japanese kimono culture. It is fragile and unique art. The wig is very heavy and hot to wear, and fragile. Katsura is usually made of real human hair, shaped with wax and treated with camilia oil in the process. Therefore it has a distinct scent, that some people call "scent of antique" or "smell of history". Katsura almost always have a decoration, which is sometimes minimal and sometimes excessive. is called bunkin-takashimada and adorned with beautiful kanzashi ornaments, combs and accessories.
  4. 4. Traditional Japanese wedding attire There are traditional wedding accessories that are worn for tradition and are said to bring good luck. The bride carries a small purse style sack called hakoseko and a small encased sword called kaiken. Lastly, a fan is worn in the obi belt for tradition holds that the gradual widening of the open fan implies happiness and thus brings a happy future. Kimono: The traditional white wedding kimono is called shiro-maku. Shiro meaning white and maku meaning pure. The white shiro-maku is worn for the wedding ceremony An elaborate rich patterned silk brocade kimono called uchikake is worn over the white kimono at the wedding reception.  Red is the most popular color for the uchikake, they are available in any vibrant color .
  5. 5. Japanese wedding attire <ul><li>Here the bride is wearing a  &quot;Tsuno Kakushi&quot; hood. This is worn to cover the brides &quot;horns&quot;, thus showing her obedience to her new husband. </li></ul><ul><li>  The bride is wearing a  gorgeous white “Shiro-maku” </li></ul><ul><li>The groom wears a traditional black men’s kimono with a “hakama” (pleated split-pant skirt) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Shinto wedding &quot;San-san-kudo,&quot; a ceremony of three-times-three exchange of nuptial cups, is performed by the bridegroom and bride. Drinks of &quot;Sake&quot; are then exchanged between members and close relatives of the both families to signify their union through the wedding. A Shinto wedding is accompanied by the traditional music and attended by &quot;Miko&quot; maidens who serve &quot;Sake&quot; in red and white dresses. The exchange of wedding rings is also a popular practice today. The bridegroom and bride proceed to the sanctuary to offer twigs of &quot;Sakaki&quot; sacred tree in worship to gods to end the main part of the wedding ceremony. It is a short service, simple in procedure but full of solemn atmosphere. Shinto weddings are small…usually only close family attends and also the ritual matchmaker.
  7. 7. Indian Weddings
  8. 8. Traditional bridal makeup and jewelry
  9. 9. Traditional Indian bridal attire Typically red or pink, but in some regions bride can choose her favorite color….usually a bright color <ul><li>Saris (most common—consists of 6 yards of cloth draped around the body. </li></ul><ul><li>Lehngas (skirt and blouse with a scarf/veil) </li></ul><ul><li>Salwar Kameez (tunic and pant suit with shawl/veil) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Bridal styles of different regions
  11. 11. Henna Brides’ hands and feet are elaborately decorated with henna paste (an herbal dye that temporarily stains the skin for a few weeks) 2 days before the wedding. A party of singing and dancing called a sangeet is held to entertain the bride during the hours long process. The groom’s name is hidden somewhere in the intricate henna design, which he has to find on the wedding night. People believe that the love that the husband will have for his wife can be predicted by the depth of the henna color The bride doesn’t have to do any housework in her new home while she still has henna on her hands
  12. 12. Haldi Before the wedding, the bride and sometimes the groom are anointed with turmeric paste (haldi or manjal) and given a ritual bath to ensure that a glowing golden complexion on the day of the wedding. This is primarily a beautification and purification ritual. Turmeric has natural antiseptic properties and it is believed to be very good for treating skin blemishes. This is also a fun family bonding ceremony, as each member of the family takes turns applying the turmeric paste to the skin of the bride or groom.
  13. 13. The Baraat: Groom’s procession The groom arrives on a horse surrounded by his relatives who sing and dance and make a lot of festive noise to announce his arrival
  14. 14. Fire ceremony (Hindu)
  15. 15. Exchange of garlands
  16. 16. Circling the fire After the fire ceremony is finished, the father of the bride will tie the bride and groom’s clothes together or will join their hands and together they will circle the fire and then take 7 steps together (saptapadi), each step symbolizing a marital vow.
  17. 17. The Saptapadi: 7 steps <ul><li>The bride and groom take 7 steps together, which symbolizes the journey they will take together in life. Each step symbolizes a marital vow: </li></ul><ul><li>The first step is taken to earn and provide a living for their household and avoiding those things that might harm them. </li></ul><ul><li>The second step is taken to build their physical, mental and spiritual powers and to lead a healthy lifestyle. </li></ul><ul><li>The third step is taken to earn and increase their wealth by righteous and proper means. </li></ul><ul><li>The fourth step is taken to acquire knowledge, happiness and harmony by mutual love, respect, understanding and faith. </li></ul><ul><li>The fifth step is taken to be blessed with healthy, righteous and brave children. </li></ul><ul><li>The sixth step is taken for self-control and longevity. </li></ul><ul><li>The seventh step is taken to be true to each other and remain life-long companions and friends. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Welcoming the bride into her new home On the left you see a South Indian tradition in which the bride knocks over a pot of rice with her right foot as she enters, representing the prosperity she will bring to her new home. Above, a Bengali bride steps in “alta” (vermilion water and makes red footsteps as she enters her new home, representing auspiciousness.
  19. 19. Muslim ceremony <ul><li>In the muslim wedding ceremony, the bride and groom stay under separate canopies until they each give their verbal consent to the marriage contract (Nikah), and then they come together as husband and wife. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Happy couples Most Indian marriages are still arranged, though that is changing in the cities.
  21. 21. Balinese Wedding Custom The bride’s teeth are being filed as part of her preparation for marriage. The reason for filing is to control evil, savage, or demonic characteristics such as greed, lust, anger, confusion, stupidity, jealousy, ill-will, and intoxication by either passion or drunkenness (represented by animal-like sharp teeth). This important life-cycle event usually occurs when a Balinese boy or girl reaches puberty-at a girl's first menstruation, when a boy's voice changes. If not then, it must definitely take place before marriage; sometimes filing is incorporated into the marriage ceremony.
  22. 22. Chinese Wedding Traditions The color red plays a vital role in the wedding festivities of the Chinese people. Red is considered by then as a bold and lucky color. In addition to this, the color signifies love, prosperity and happiness; therefore, everything is in red - wedding invitations, gift envelopes and the bride's wedding dress. It is also important that the symbol for double happiness is placed on Chinese invitations, envelopes and wedding decorations, and accessories. For the Chinese people, the purpose of marriage is to continue the ancestral line and to create alliances between two families.
  23. 23. Pakistani bride and groom
  24. 24. Malaysian Bride and Groom
  25. 25. Korean Bride and Groom

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