Student Managed Farm Final Dairy Presentation 2012

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  • KATS NOTES: THANK YOU CALVIN. FOR THOSE OF YOU THAT DON’T KNOW, MY NAME IS KAT WIGGANS. I AM THE COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER AND FINIANCIAL MANAGER FOR THE DAIRY SMF TEAM. OUR TEAM CONSISTS OF 8 MEMBERS : MARK LIKAJKSDFKJLIJKLHW4THJKILRJKLIGDFIHLKSGDJKNLHDFS……….
  • TO START OFF OUR PRESENTATION I WOULD LIKE TO CALL UPON OUR TEAM LEADER, MARK LUYMES TO PRESENT AN OVER VIEW OF THE DAIRY UNIT AT LAKELAND COLLEGE .
  • KATS NOTES : Thank you Mark for the overview of the dairy operation. I would now like to invite our production manager Jeremy to discuss Lakelands dairy herd
  • 305 day lactation so average in middle at 150 DIM.The less the better b/c Cows have the highest production in early lactation*DHI recordsWith such high production and butterfat production we had to lease in quota“as you can see in sept we were at 23 litres and 31 litres.. As of feb we were at 29 litres and 39 litres… as this graph shows, we have had a gradual increase in production”
  • IBC – pathoSCC – indicator of quality of milk. The white blood cells.. The higher the white blood cells the higher the pathogen cell count (less then 400,000 or get fined)
  • Our production increased drastically due to a high volume of cows that moved into the parlor. This issue is slow to resolve because it takes time to even out lump calving without losing profit. We are trying to improve this issue by breeding less cows per month. We would have shipped 10600$ worth of milk without pay. We voted as a team to lease quota, which was approved by Josie and Carmen. We spent just under 4000$ to lease quota, and in return we made a profit of 3400$. KATS NOTES: THANK YOU JEREMY. MOVING ON, AS A TEAM WE IMPLEMENTED CHANGES TO THE SANDARD OPERATING PROCDUERS. DUSTIN COLEMEN WILL EXSTRAPOLATE FURTHER.
  • In September we reviewed the SOPs what we have done and the outcomesLower stature in HolsteinsWe learned that the best way to improve our herds genetics was to select for certain criteria.The criteria that we chose with the last straws were:Higher milk productionHealth and fertility Good feet and legsMinimize inbreeding percentageGoldwyn DUSTIN - After updating all the SOP, we decided as a team it would beneficial to see the results of our research and efforts as they developed. We implemented a program called Manager of the week. This program was to give each student a chance to monitor the progress of the SOPs and report back to the group on other issues that may need attention.
  • KATS NOTES : THANK YOU DUSTIN. AS A RESULT OF MANAGER OF THE WEEK WE DEDUCED THAT OUR FEEDING PROGRAM NEEDED TO BE FINE TUNED. GRAHAM WILL DISCUSS THE ACTIONS WE TOOK REGARDING THIS MATTER.
  • We had two nutritionists come to view our herd and help us move forward and improve our production. MITCH STEWART from Cargill helped us switch from a home mixed ration to a complete feed. We voted as a team to move forward with this change because it took up only one load out (only from one bin), it has the same cost as the mixed ration and there is more consistency in what the cows are fed. We also switched the calves to a BIR (built in roughage) pellet; research shows that calves benefit from this feed.The second opinion we got was from an independent nutritionist, Barry Robinson. He suggested we test the consistency of the TMR as is being fed directly from the new feed wagon. We took samples as the feed was being unloaded at different weights and had it tested for sodium levels; easy to test for. We had a positive result showing the new feed wagon is mixing the ingredients evenly and unloading them consistently.
  • By monitoring feed intake we have noticed a decrease in sorting. We rely on the production of the herd to be profitable. For a dairy cow to produce larger amounts of milk they need constant energy which they get from there feed. We noticed a that there were several hours of the day where the cows did not have access to feed. So we also increased the amounts of feed per cow. In return we have seen an increase in production.KATS NOTES: THANK YOU GRAHAM. INORDER TO OPTIMIZE PRODUCTION THROUGH FEED INTAKE, PROPER HEALTH IS CRUTIAL. KELLY WILL DISCUSS THREE OF THE HEALTH ISSUES WE INCOUNTERED THIS YEAR. KAT NOTES: Thanks Graham. Next Kelly will give an overall report on the health of our herd, the challenges we have overcome and the programs we are taking part in.
  • Gram positive – treat with antibioticsGram negitive – there is no treatment.. Milk cannot go into the tank, but she will heal herself.. at managers discretion
  • KATS NOTES: Thank you Kelly. Up next we have the one and only James Harbers, coming all the way from Ontario, to talk about an opportunity we were presented with from Lakeland College.
  • Cow Brush:Main function: -overall cleanliness/ welfare of animalsHow it works: -once cow touches brush it begins to spin and the bristles will begin to groom the cow until she is pleasured Results: -happy, cleaner cowsTime Temperature Recorder:Main Functions: -Producer warnings and alarms. -Maintaining a history of settings, measurements, warnings, events and alarms. -Providing milking start and finish times for official individual cow testing programs. (DHI)  How it works: -records temp of milk -records wash temp of milk tank, pipelines, and milking units -records start and finish times(my side notes: Time/temperature recorders monitor the temperature of the milk, as well as the temperature of the water that cleans the milking equipment. If the temperature does not meet government guidelines, an alarm will alert the dairy farmer that there is a problem. The farmer can then correct the problem before it becomes a food safety concern) Heatime Rumination: manufactured in Is real by SCR precise dairy farmingMain function: -easier detection of heats -easier detection of cows not eating  How it works: -Creates a baseline -records activity by a bubble -records rumination by muscle movements -let you know about abnormalities Results: (My notes: Everything you love about the heatime system but with a built-in microphone that records and analyzes rumination, giving you unprecedented insight into individual cow health status to quickly identify sick cows, reduce drug use and reduce any related loss of milk production) 
  • Kats notes: thanks James! Now I will update you on our financial status.
  • REFERENCE HANDOUT~~~
  • Kats notes : As a team we were given the task of looking into the new barn ideas. Steph will present you with our suggestions.
  • With this I can talk about the cable scraper, the headhttp://www.brouwersequipment.com/eng/page.php?nodeId=213 to head stalls and the sand bedding.
  • KATS NOTES: Thank you Steph. I will call upon Mark for closing remarks.
  • We would like to thank:Ken Murray for your guidanceDenise Martin and Sharon Reiter for your help with paper work, meeting schedules, and appointmentsJosie Van Lent, Blair Dow and Larry Bingham for your time and positive supportPete Wilkenson, Jamie Anderson, Carmen Cadrain, Cheryl Scott, and the part time staff for your help with everything around the farmScott Webb for supporting the SMF teams through New Holland
  • Student Managed Farm Final Dairy Presentation 2012

    1. 1. • Mark Luymes – Leader• Kat Wiggans – Financial Manager & Communications Officer• Jeremy Rouw – Production Manager• Dustin Coleman• Graham Turbett• Kelly Armstrong• James Harbers• Stephanie Carlier
    2. 2. • Our happy little farm was built in 1984: – 31 Holsteins – 15 Jerseys• Milk production average per lactation: – Lakeland College : 10,414 kg – Canada : 9,768 kg• Cost vs profit per cow of the Dairy Operation: – Cost : $6,800 – Profit : $7,780• Classifier: – Heifers - 2.5 points above national average
    3. 3. Strengths Opportunities• Butterfat (quota) • Increased profit• Conception Rate • Calving Intervals• Calf Health • Consistency (SOP)• Total Mixed Ration (TMR) • Herd Expansion• Heatime Rumination • Additional quota• Consistency (less sorting, TMR waste)
    4. 4. Threats Weaknesses• Longevity • Aging Facilities• Biosecurity • Flooring• Inconsistency within • Over crowding operation • Temperature control• Calf morbidity • Ventilation
    5. 5. Jersey HolsteinSept 2011 : Feb 2012 Sept 2011 : Feb 2012 23 L/day : 29 L/day 31 L/day : 39 L/day
    6. 6. LLC AlbertaPRICE PER HL $84.14 $80.73BFAT 4.1 3.9PROTEIN 3.5 3.3IBC – Individual 9,000 Rank 146/588bacteria countSCC – Somatic Cell 129,000 Rank 107/588Count
    7. 7. • 12,325 L of milk produced above our quota in January and February• Leased quota• $3,400 profit over expenses
    8. 8. Calf Milking• BIR pellet • Updated• Only feed hay 30 • Added pictures days post weaningBreeding Vaccination• Created • Neil Carruthers (Pfizer)• Sire selection • Currently• Timing (Heatime) implementing
    9. 9. • Checklist in the barn – Environmental, health and feed components – Bedding and cow comfort – Heatime and calvings• Developed to encourage more student involvement• Each member checked the barn twice a day; for 1 week
    10. 10. • Mitch Stuart – Cargill nutritionist – Switched to a complete feed – BIR pellets• Barry Robinson – Independent nutritionist – Sodium levels • Positive results
    11. 11. TopMiddle Bottom
    12. 12. • Implemented a new footbath protocol in December• Decreased foot lesions – 25% in 2011 – 7% in 2012• Decreased digital dermatitis – November 1st 2011 : 9 cases – March 30th 2012 : 2 cases
    13. 13. • Mastitis is the top reason for culling cows • We purchased an inexpensive on-farm mastitis testing kit – Results in 24 hours – Gram positive or gram negative indicatorsGram Positive Gram NegativeTest Test
    14. 14. • Alberta Johne’s Disease Initiative – Dr. Mike DeVries • risk assessment of our herd • Took fecal samples from random groups – Are waiting for final results• Hoping we can be certified Johne’s free!
    15. 15. • Cow Brush – Agrai Dairy Mart®• Sawdust Thrower – Webbs®• Time Temperature Recorder – Agrai Dairy Mart ®• Heatime Rumination – Westgen®
    16. 16. Benefits: – Cleaner cows – Happy/ healthier cows
    17. 17. Benefits: – Decreased labor and time – Able to bed more frequently – Useful for all SMF divisions
    18. 18. • Benefits: – Gathers finite details – Reduces the chance for human error – Detect issues before they become problems – Ability to keep detailed records**** Not yet installed
    19. 19. Benefits : – Identifies health issues – Heat detection – Monitors rumination
    20. 20. INCOME April 1st 2011 – March 31st 2012Livestock Products $370,000Livestock Sales $13,500Miscellaneous / $5,500RebatesTOTAL $389,000
    21. 21. EXPENSES April 1st 2011 – March 31st 2012Feed and Bedding $162,000Labour $119,000Farm Miscellaneous $40,000Herd Maintenance $19,000TOTAL $340,000 • Net Income $49,000 • 14% Profit
    22. 22. 2011 2012 INCOME $382,000 $389,000 EXPENSES $337,000 $340,000NET INCOME $45,000 $49,000
    23. 23. • Suggestions from the class of 2012• 100 milking cows in a split herd – 4 management groups Hospital
    24. 24. • Sand bedding• Head to head• Freestall• Automated cable manure scrapers
    25. 25. • Double 8 parallel• Opportunity for individual indexing• Rapid release
    26. 26. Pulse Start Halide LightsNight Lights
    27. 27. • Automated curtains• Cost efficient• Desirable natural environment• Minimal maintenance
    28. 28. • Delegate committees – New barn – Finances – Production• Maintain Production Consistency• Alternative calf management – Ventilation• Feed requirements
    29. 29. • Ken Murray • Carmen Cadrain• Denise Martin • Cheryl Scott• Sharon Reiter • Jo Dixon• Deanna Krys • Part time milking staff and volunteers• Josie Van Lent • Scott Webb – New• Blair Dow Holland• Larry Bingham • People mentioned• Pete Wilkinson earlier – Phil, Mike, Mitch• Jamie Anderson and Barry
    30. 30. • New barn – images from Google• Benchmarks - • The Canadian Dairy Industry at a Glance. (2011, August). Retrieved from Canadian Dairy Information Centre: http://www.dairyinfo.gc.ca/index_e.php?s1=cdi-ilc• (2012, February). Retrieved from CanWest DHI - Profitable Dairy Management: http://canwestdhi.com/• Milk Test Results. (2012, February). Retrieved from Alberta Milk: http://albertamilk.com/membersonly/milktestresults.aspx• Milk Pay Statement. (2012, February). Retrieved from Alberta Milk: http://albertamilk.com/membersonly/milkpaystatement.aspx

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