Hudson RBE-RN workshop CRT and MALP for struggling ELLs

383 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
383
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hudson RBE-RN workshop CRT and MALP for struggling ELLs

  1. 1. Promo%ng  Academic  Achievement  for   Students  with  Limited  or  Interrupted   Formal  Educa%on   Andrea  DeCapua,  Ed.D.   New  York  University     Helaine  W.  Marshall,  Ph.D.   Long  Island  University  -­‐  Hudson  
  2. 2. Layers  of  the  Instruc%onal  Context      Curriculum,  Instruc%on,  and  Assessment          Culturally  Responsive  Teaching   Societal  Factors   Bedrock  Layer    
  3. 3. Scenarios   Please  follow  instruc0ons                    for  this  role  play  ac0vity.  
  4. 4. •  Open  manila  envelope,  randomly  take  out  index  card.    This  card  indicates   role  you  have  in  ac9vity.     –  If  you  take  card  labeled  “Student,”  take  small  white  envelope  also  labeled   “Student.”    Open  it,  read  your  profile,  do  not  reveal  anything  about  your   profile  to  others  in  your  group.    However,  if  you  have  a  rela9ve  or  friend   indicated  in  your  profile,”  you  confer  with  him  or  her  as  you  play  your   roles.   –  If  you  take  index  card  labeled  “Mother/Father/Sister/Guardian/Friend,”   take  small  white  envelope  also  so  labeled.    Open  envelope,  read  your   profile  but  do  not  reveal  anything  about  your  profile  to  others  in  group,   other  than  prospec9ve  student.     •  Make  decisions  about  student.   •  Report  back  to  larger  group,  using  next  slide  to  guide  you     –  Brief  descrip9on  of  student     –  What  you  decided  to  do  and  why   –  Issues  that  arose  during  ac9vity  
  5. 5. Role  Play  Sharing   Descrip9on  of   Student   Decisions   Issues  
  6. 6.   Please  follow  the  instruc0ons  
  7. 7. Teachers  and  learners  assume  that     1.  the  goals  of  K-­‐12  instruc9on  are     a)  to  produce  an  independent  learner   b)  to  prepare  that  learner  for  life  aQer                        schooling      2.  the  learner  brings  along   a) an  urge  par9cipate  as  an  individual   b)  age-­‐appropriate  prepara9on  for   (i)   literacy  development   (ii)   academic  tasks   (DeCapua  &  Marshall,  2011)  
  8. 8. Rural  Primary  Educa%on   ©  www.globalafricanvillage.org    Used  by  permission.      
  9. 9. What  is  it?  
  10. 10. Three  Major  Differences   •  Oral  versus  Print     •  Pragma9c  versus  Academic     •  Collec9vis9c  versus  Individualis9c  
  11. 11. I  never  care  about  reading  un9l    I   come  here    In  my  country  nothing  to   read  but  here,  everywhere  print,   words  and  signs  and  books  and  you   have  to  read   The  most  importants  I  have   learned  about  the  United  States   that  is  a  book,  newspapers,  or   notebook  and  pens.       These  things  are  always  let  me   know  how  to  live  here.        
  12. 12. Pragma%c  vs.  Academic  Tasks   •  Defini9ons   •  What  is  a  tree?     •  True/False   •  Washington  DC  is  the  capital  of  the  U.S.   •  New  York  City  is  the  capital  of  New  York  State.     •  Classifica9on   •  Categorize  these  objects  
  13. 13. (Adapted  from  Luria,  1976)                                                                   Sample  Task  
  14. 14.    Collec%vism        vs.      Individualism  
  15. 15. Teachers  and  learners  assume  that     1.  the  goals  of  K-­‐12  instruc9on  are     a)  to  produce  an  independent  learner   b)  to  prepare  that  learner  for  life  aQer                        schooling      2.  the  learner  brings  along   a) an  urge  to  par9cipate  as  an  individual   b)  age-­‐appropriate  prepara9on  for   (i)   literacy  development   (ii)   academic  tasks   (DeCapua  &  Marshall,  2011)  
  16. 16. (Ibarra,  2001)  
  17. 17. Break  
  18. 18. Mutually  Adap%ve  Learning  Paradigm   MALP©   •  Instruc9onal  model   •  Elements  from  students’learning  paradigm   •  Elements  from  Western-­‐style  educa9on   •  Transi9onal  approach  to  achievement  gap  by   addressing  cultural  dissonance  
  19. 19. SLIFE   U.S.    Classrooms   CONDITIONS   PROCESSES   ACTIVITIES Aspects  of     Learning         Shared Responsibility Individual Accountability Pragmatic Tasks Academic Tasks Interconnectedness   Oral Transmission Independence   Written Word Future    Relevance  Immediate  Relevance     Two  Different  Learning  Paradigms     (DeCapua  &  Marshall,  2009,  2011;  Marshall,  1994;  Marshall  &  DeCapua,  2013)  
  20. 20. Two  Different  Learning  Paradigms   SLIFE   U.S.  Classrooms   Immediate  Relevance   Future    Relevance   Shared  Responsibility   Pragma9c  Tasks   CONDITIONS     PROCESSES   ACTIVITIES     Interconnectedness   Oral  Transmission   Independence   (DeCapua  &  Marshall,  2009,  2011;  Marshall,  1994;  Marshall  &  DeCapua,  2013)   Aspects  of     Learning   Individual    Accountability   Academic  Tasks   Wrigen  Word     Standardized  Tes-ng!     Two  Different  Learning  Paradigms    
  21. 21. Mutually  Adap%ve  Learning  Paradigm  MALP©   Instruc%onal  Model   SLIFE U.S. Classrooms ACCEPT    SLIFE   CONDITIONS   COMBINE  SLIFE                       &  U.S.   PROCESSES   FOCUS  on  U.S.   ACTIVITIES  with   familiar  language     &  content   with (DeCapua & Marshall, 2010, 2011; Marshall 1994, 1998) Interconnectedness Independence Shared Responsibility Individual Accountability Pragmatic Tasks Academic Tasks Immediate Relevance Oral Transmission Written Word Future Relevance
  22. 22. Two  Learning  Ac%vi%es        FAMILIAR      SCHEMATA        UNFAMILIAR        SCHEMATA     Describing your favorite game in your native language or dialect Explaining steps to solve a math problem in academic English   Two  Learning  Ac%vi%es    
  23. 23. Ques%ons  to  ask     about  the  Mystery  Bag   •  Do  you  know  what  it  is?   •  Do  you  know  what  it  is  called  in  your   language?   •  What  do  you  do  with  it?    What  is  it  for?   •  Do  you  like  it?   •  Give  4  words  to  describe  it.    
  24. 24. CHECKING  ANSWERS   •  One  by  one,  check  all  the  answers   •  All  par9cipate  in  the  checking   ›  Give  answers    -­‐  tabulate  them   ›  Write  answers  up    as  others  give  them     ›  Copy  down  all  descrip9ve  words   And  now………  
  25. 25. Apple  Collec%on  
  26. 26. Benefits  of  Collec%ons   •  Building  defini9ons   •  Learning  ways  to  categorize  objects     •  Developing  vocabulary       Ø academic  terms   Ø descrip9ve  adjec9ves     •  Collabora9ng  on  a  class  project    
  27. 27. Categoriza%on   A/An  _______________________                    is              a/an  _______________________                            Important:    small  before  big!  
  28. 28. Characteris%cs   •  with  ___________________     Or     •  that  has  ________________    
  29. 29. Specific  Descrip%ons   •  green   •  good   •  delicious   •  round   •  sweet   •  plas9c   •  wood   •  heavy   •  glass   •  silver   •  small   •   soap   •  key  chain   •  teapot   •  bank   •  basket   •  magnet   •  paperweight  
  30. 30. Mutually  Adap%ve  Learning  Paradigm  MALP©   Instruc%onal  Model   SLIFE U.S. Classrooms ACCEPT    SLIFE   CONDITIONS   COMBINE  SLIFE                       &  U.S.   PROCESSES   FOCUS  on  U.S.   ACTIVITIES  with   familiar  language     &  content   with (DeCapua & Marshall, 2010, 2011; Marshall 1994, 1998) Interconnectedness Independence Shared Responsibility Individual Accountability Pragmatic Tasks Academic Tasks Immediate Relevance Oral Transmission Written Word Future Relevance
  31. 31. Implemen%ng  MALP©   •  Carol’s  Social  Studies  Class                        –  Unit  Design   •  Gloria’s  Math  Class                    –  Classroom  Posters  
  32. 32. Carol’s ClassCarol’s  Class  
  33. 33. Carol’s    Class   Ages:        15  –  21   Educa%on:       3rd  grade  to  8th  grade   Classes:    Self-­‐contained   –  English     –  Social  Studies   –  Math   –  Science   Countries  of  origin:     Hai%,  Dominican  Republic,                               El  Salvador,  Guatemala    
  34. 34. Carol's    Social  Studies  Unit   Objec%ves:    Students  will  be  able  to       (1) Describe  the  everyday  life  of  a  Civil  War  soldier   (2) Compare/contrast  it  with  their  own  lives  today  
  35. 35. Survey:  Students’  Free  Time  
  36. 36. Research  
  37. 37. Class Venn DiagramClass  Venn  Diagram  
  38. 38. Student  Venn  Diagram  
  39. 39. •  Gathering  data  from   secondary  sources   •  Comparing  and   contras%ng  data   •  Analyzing  data  from   graphs   Student  Bar  Graph  
  40. 40. And  now  on  to  math  .  .  .  
  41. 41. Gloria’s  Math  Class   •  Ages:    14  -­‐  18   •  Educa%on:       –  5th  grade  –  9th  grade   •  Class:         –  Integrated  Algebra   –  Low-­‐proficiency  ELLs  and  SLIFE   •  Origin:   –  Dominican  Republic,  Ecuador,   Mexico,  Puerto  Rico  and  Albania  
  42. 42. Gloria’s  Math  Learning  Environment   Objec%ves:    Students  will  be  able  to     (1) Use  wall  posters  as  supports  to  solve  problems   and  provide  sentence  level  solu%ons   (2) Create  partner  posters  to  illustrate   mathema%cal  concepts,  including:   a.  Number  lines   b.  Bar  graphs   c.  Like  and  unlike  terms  
  43. 43. •  Word  wall   •  Calendar   •  Sentence  frames   •  Teacher-­‐made  concept   posters   •  Student–produced   posters    What  does  a  MALP  Classroom  Look  Like?  
  44. 44. Word  Wall  
  45. 45. Class  Calendar  
  46. 46. Sentence  Frames  
  47. 47. Teacher-­‐made  Concept  Poster  
  48. 48. Number  Lines  
  49. 49. Bar  Graph  Posters  
  50. 50. Like  and  Unlike  Terms  Posters  
  51. 51. Runway  to  Common  Core  for  SLIFE   •  Informal  Learning  –  no  academic  ways  of   thinking  or  responding   •  MALP©  –  Common  Core  Readiness  –  building   new  schemata  for  academic  tasks   •  ESL  Program  with  NYS  Progressions  for  New   Language  Arts  (English)   •  Mainstream  ELA  Common  Core  Learning   Standards  
  52. 52. More  about  MALP©?   •  Our  books  (University  of  Michigan  Press):   Mee-ng  the  needs  of  students  with  limited  or  interrupted  formal  educa-on:  A   guide  for  educators  (2009)   Breaking  new  ground:  Teaching  students  with  limited  or  interrupted  formal   educa-on  in  U.  S.  secondary  schools  (2011)   Making  the  transi-on  to  classroom  success:  Culturally  Responsive  Teaching  for   struggling  language  learners    (2013)     •  Our  websites:       hip://malpeduca%on.com                      hip://malp.pbworks.com   •  Our  ar%cles:                              TESOL  Journal,  ELT  Journal,  Preven-ng  School  Failure,  Urban  Review  and  more   •  Our  email:   drandreadecapua@gmail.com          helaine.marshall@liu.edu      

×