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Digital Agenda for Europe

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Digital Agenda for Europe

  1. 1. Digital Agenda for Europe Delivering Digital Growth And Jobs Franck Boissière DG CONNECT - F1: Growth & Jobs 22 October 2013
  2. 2. “Every European Digital” N. Kroes
  3. 3. “Every European Digital” N. Kroes
  4. 4. Why ICT matters "Endorsing the cloud" could add 0,1-0,4% of GDP growth to the EU. ICT = 6% of EU GDP ICT investment →50% productivity growth Internet usage X2 every 2-3 years, Wireless connected devices: doubling from 25 to 50BL, 2015-20 Mobile data traffic: x12-14, 2012-18 Digitalized SMEs produce 10% more, grow and export twice and create twice the jobs ordinary ones do Internet has contributed to 21% of GDP growth across the G20 from 2005 to 2010 GROWTH 4 million ICT workers, grow 3% p.a. even in crisis But Europe lacks 1 million ICT specialists
  5. 5. Digital Performance: EU v global competitors 5
  6. 6. Digital Agenda 2013 Scoreboard  Basic Broadband virtually everywhere – Fast broadband >30 Mbps reaches 54% of EU  Internet access increasingly going mobile - 36% of EU citizens use portable devices  50% have no or low computer skills – 40% of companies have difficulties recruiting IT specialists  1,000,000 ICT vacancies by 2015  eCommerce growing steadily, but not cross-border 99,9%
  7. 7. Pillars - Digital Agenda for Europe Digital Single Market Interoperability & Standards Trust & Security Fast and ultra-fast Internet access Research and innovation Enhancing digital literacy, skills and inclusion ICT-enabled benefits for EU society
  8. 8. The Digital Single Market – borderless EU economy Fragmented National Frameworks Digital Single Market
  9. 9. So close and yet so far away
  10. 10. SMEs selling online remains a rare sight
  11. 11. What does a Connected Continent mean for… …ICT companies & startups? • The chance to innovate and develop – knowing operators can't block or throttle your bright ideas • A connected home market where your innovations can grow and succeed • A more aligned spectrum market – for wireless services and gadgets that work perfectly across the EU …big businesses? • Communications that serve all your sites – without multiple providers and contracts • New innovations: -Secure communications -Top-quality videoconferencing -Speedy cloud computing • Broadband that is reliable, pervasive, fast • An economic boost worth €90 bn / year …citizens? More choice & more telecoms providers competing in your country The right to choose a "bundle" you can use across the EU – without unfair roaming charges The guaranteed right to the full, open Internet – no blocked services Easier, more consistent consumer protection – wherever you are …telecoms providers? • A stronger sector for a connected continent …Europe? • The chance to work between countries with consistent • 21st century digital infrastructure – like they rules, regulators & remedies have in the US and Asia • Easier to plan and bid across borders • More growth and jobs from the broadband • The chance to think big and compete globally boost • The chance to provide innovative services • More competitiveness for every sector that • Stable, consistent rules for investment depends on connectivity – from transport to  More fast broadband for more Europeans television. #ConnectedContinent
  12. 12. It's not just Telcos - the whole economy needs the ICT sector fixed. Energy and Utilities 2% Hospitality, Hotels and Leisure Wholesale and 3% Distribution 3% Natural Resources Construction 2% 1% Educational Services 1% Retail Trade 3% Healthcare 4% Consumer 33% Transportation 5% Manufacturing 8% ICT spending by industry segment 2012 Services 8% Financial Services 10% Government Telecom 8% 9% Source: OCDE, Internet Economy Outlook 2012 #ConnectedContinent
  13. 13. The demand for telecoms services will keep growing Global mobile traffic 2010- 2018 This means low investment is becoming a chronic problem. Regulators bear some responsibility to make investment easier
  14. 14. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
  15. 15. Trust and Security 40% citizens not assured to spread data over internet 38% citizens not assured to pay over internet Citizens not assured! 16% enterprises experienced threats to their internet-based systems Trust Risks of Disruption of critical networks and online business activities. Local approaches not sufficient
  16. 16. Very fast internet supply and demand Correlation Fixed Broadband Penetration and Competitiveness WEF's Global Competitive Index score 5.8 Sweden 5.6 Finland Japan 5.4 5.2 US UK Belgium Austria Germany 4.8 Netherlands France Luxembourg 5 Denmark Korea Ireland Estonia 4.6 Czech Rep. Poland 4.4 Portugal Spain Lithuania Italy Hungary 4.2 Bulgaria Slovakia Cyprus Slovenia Malta Latvia Romania 4 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 0.35 0.4 0.45 Fixed broadband lines per 100 population A 10% increase in the broadband penetration rate results in 1 to 1.5% increase in annual GDP per-capita. Faster broadband = higher GDP growth. (Czernich et al. University of Munich, 2009)
  17. 17. Speeding up Public Sector Innovation E-gov: 15-20% reduction in admin costs Savings but maintained service levels E-procurement savings: €100bn per year ICT Investments Extra resources for investments Re-use of PS data: €140bn economic value E-health savings e.g. Italy €12.4bn (11.7% of NHS expenditure)
  18. 18. Cloud Computing Over €100 BL impact on GDP pa 3.8m jobs by 2020 Change of paradigm Cloud Cloud computing strategy 1) Better standards, no lock in, certification 2) Safe and fair contract terms and conditions 3) EU Cloud Partnership (public, common procurement requirements)
  19. 19. Entrepreneurship and digital jobs and skills ICT investment More infrastructure + e-readiness/skills GDP increase More ICT use across ALL sectors Higher total productivity Take-up of online services More innovation (also in management, logisti cs…), new products
  20. 20. Computer skills Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
  21. 21. Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
  22. 22. Grand Coalition 5 Policy Clusters
  23. 23. Some Current Pledges  ICT TRAINING:  Online ICT learning platform (Academy Cube)  Smart grid training, etc.  NEW LEARNING:  Support industry/education provider collaboration  Launch MOOC for secondary teachers  CERTIFICATION:  Support roll-out of common eCompetences framework  MOBILITY:  Launch mobility assistance services  AWARENESS RAISING:  GetOnline Week
  24. 24. Public investment in ICT R&D Digital Agenda Scoreboard 2013
  25. 25. Beyond R&D&I: An industrial agenda for key enabling technologies
  26. 26. Full implementation of updated DAE - Impacts 5% expected increase of European GDP by 2020 1.2 million jobs to be created in infrastructure construction in the short term, rising to 3.8 million jobs throughout the economy in the long term Growth & Jobs
  27. 27. Stakeholder Engagement Going Local 2013 DAE Member State implementation survey
  28. 28. National Digital Agendas
  29. 29. Digital Agenda – widely emulated in the EU National Digital Agenda or compatible CY, EE, FI, DE, IT, LT, MT, NL, policy framework adopted PT, RO, ES, SE, FR, (CH, TR) National Digital Agenda or compatible BE, BG, CZ, GR, HU, LV, SI, policy framework under way (NO) Coordinated or aggregated/combined approach of specific digital national AT, DK, IE, LU, PL, SK, UK initiatives, but no single overarching strategy
  30. 30. Regional Digital Agendas Many regional and local authorities have implemented digital strategies They reflect key DAE priorities: • investment in broadband infrastructure • ICT enterprises • e-Government • e-Health, inclusion and accessibility. European Union Regions
  31. 31. DAE DAE DAE NDA NDA NDA NDA RDA RDA RDA
  32. 32. Development of digital strategies at national and regional/inter-regional/transnational level. Region Region Region Region
  33. 33. Regional Digital Agenda Seminar: March 2014 with Committee of the Regions The opportunity for regions across Europe to meet, share best practices and exchange innovative ideas.
  34. 34. Thank you ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda DigitalAgenda blogs.ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/ @DigitalAgendaEU http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/ http://www.daeimplementation.eu
  35. 35. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
  36. 36. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services
  37. 37. Interoperability & Standards Promote standard-setting rules Propose legislation on ICT interoperability Member States to implement Malmö and Granada declarations MS to implement European Interoperability Framework Provide guidance on ICT standardisation and public procurement Adopt a European Interoperability Strategy and Framework Identify and assess means of requesting significant market players to licence information about their products or services

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