Successfully reported this slideshow.
Actual Pictures From Another Worlds 




      www.anotherpalebluedot.blogspot.com
Mars has two tiny 
moons, Phobos 
and Deimos, 
whose names are 
derived from the 
Greek for Fear and 
Panic. The larger 
m...
Hyperion is a moon of 
Saturn discovered in 
1848. It is 
distinguished by its 
irregular shape, its 
chaotic rotation, an...
Jupiter's moon Io. Two 
sulfurous eruptions are visible 
in this color composite image 
from the robotic Galileo 
spacecra...
Locked in synchronous 
rotation, the Moon always 
presents its well­known 
near side to Earth. But from 
lunar orbit, Apol...
This dramatic image 
features a dark red Moon 
during a total lunar eclipse 
­­ celestial shadow play 
enjoyed by many den...
In October of 1846, William 
Lassell was observing the 
newly discovered planet 
Neptune. He was attempting 
to confirm hi...
The Spirit rover attacked 
Mars again in 2005 
September. What might 
look, above, like a 
military attack, though, 
was o...
Spewed from a volcano, a 
complex plume rises over 300 
kilometers above the horizon 
of Jupiter's moon Io in this 
image ...
io 
       Jupiter 

Mean Radius: 1821.46 
km 
Mass: 0.0149 (Earth=1) 
Density: 3.55 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.183 
(Earth=1) 
...
Swooping below Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft spied several strange wonders. Visible in the distance are 
some of the many...
Asteroid Itokawa. The unusual asteroid has been visited recently by the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa 
that has been docume...
Small Worlds: Ceres and Vesta: Ceres and Vesta are, respectively, only around 950 kilometers and 530 kilometers in 
diamet...
Mercury 
Mean Radius: 2439.7 
km 
Mass: 0.055 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 5.43 
(g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.284 
(Earth=1) 
Orbit Period...
Mars 
Mean Radius: 
3389.5 km 
Mass: 0.108 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 3.94 
(g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.380 
(Earth=1) 
Orbit Period: 6...
Ganymede 
        Jupiter 

Mean Radius: 
2632.345 km 
Mass: 0.0249 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 1.93 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.145 
(E...
Callisto 
        Jupiter 

Mean Radius: 2409.3 
km 
Mass: 0.0179 (Earth=1) 
Density: 1.851 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.124 
(Ear...
Thetys 
        Saturn 

Mean Radius: 529.8 
km 
Mass: 0.000104 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 1.0 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.018 
(Earth=...
Dione 
      Saturn 

Mean Radius: 560 
km 
Mass: 0.000176 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 1.44 
(g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.023 
(Earth=1) ...
Rhea 
         Saturn 

Mean Radius: 764 km 
Mass: 0.000387 (Earth=1) 
Density: 1.24 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.029 (Earth=1) 
O...
Iapetus 
       Saturn 

Mean Radius: 718 km 
   Mass: 0.000266 
       (Earth=1) 
Density: 1.02 (g/cm^3) 
   Gravity: 0.0...
Ariel 
       Uranus 

Mean Radius: 578.9 
         km 
   Mass: 0.00021 
      (Earth=1) 
   Density: 1.56 
      (g/cm^3...
Umbriel 
       Uranus 

Mean Radius: 584.7 km 
Mass: 0.000196 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 1.52 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.022 
(Earth=...
Titania 
       Uranus 

Mean Radius: 788.9 
km 
Mass: 0.000504 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 1.70 (g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.029 
(Earth...
Oberon 
       Uranus 

Mean Radius: 761.4 
km 
Mass: 0.00051 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 1.64 
(g/cm^3) 
Gravity: 0.028 
(Earth=...
Trition 
      Neptune 

Mean Radius: 1352.6 
km 
Mass: 0.0036 
(Earth=1) 
Density: 2.054 
(g/cm^3) 
Gravity: (0.077) 
(Ea...
Actual Pictures From Another Worlds
Actual Pictures From Another Worlds
Actual Pictures From Another Worlds
Actual Pictures From Another Worlds
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Actual Pictures From Another Worlds

807 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
  • Be the first to comment

Actual Pictures From Another Worlds

  1. 1. Actual Pictures From Another Worlds  www.anotherpalebluedot.blogspot.com
  2. 2. Mars has two tiny  moons, Phobos  and Deimos,  whose names are  derived from the  Greek for Fear and  Panic. The larger  moon, Phobos, is  indeed seen to be  a cratered,  asteroid­like object  in this stunning  color image from  the Mars Express  spacecraft,  recorded at a  resolution of about  seven meters per  pixel. But Phobos  orbits so close to  Mars ­ about 5,800  kilometers above  the surface  compared to  400,000 kilometers  for our Moon ­
  3. 3. Hyperion is a moon of  Saturn discovered in  1848. It is  distinguished by its  irregular shape, its  chaotic rotation, and its  unexplained sponge­  like appearance.  The robot Cassini now  orbiting Saturn  swooped past moon in  late 2005 and took an  image of  unprecedented detail.  The image, shown in  false color, shows a  remarkable world with  strange craters and a  generally odd surface.  Hyperion is about 250  kilometers across, and  has a density so low  that it might house a  vast system of caverns  inside
  4. 4. Jupiter's moon Io. Two  sulfurous eruptions are visible  in this color composite image  from the robotic Galileo  spacecraft that orbited Jupiter  from 1995 to 2003. At the  image top, over Io's limb, a  bluish plume rises about 140  kilometers above the surface  of a volcanic caldera known  as Pillan Patera. In the image  middle, near the night/day  shadow line, the ring shaped  Prometheus plume is seen  rising about 75 kilometers  above Io while casting a  shadow below the volcanic  vent. Named for the Greek  god who gave mortals fire, the  Prometheus plume is visible  in every image ever made of  the region dating back to the  Voyager flybys of 1979 ­  presenting the possibility that  this plume has been  continuously active for at least  18 years. The above digitally  sharpened image was  originally recorded in 1997 on  June 28 from a distance of  about 600,000 kilometers.
  5. 5. Locked in synchronous  rotation, the Moon always  presents its well­known  near side to Earth. But from  lunar orbit, Apollo  astronauts also grew to  know the Moon's far side.  This sharp picture from  Apollo 16's mapping  camera shows the eastern  edge of the familiar near  side (top) and the strange  and heavily cratered far  side of the Moon.  Surprisingly, the rough and  battered surface of the far  side looks very different  from the near side which is  covered with smooth dark  lunar maria. The likely  explanation is that the far  side crust is thicker, making  it harder for molten material  from the interior to flow to  the surface and form the  smooth maria.
  6. 6. This dramatic image  features a dark red Moon  during a total lunar eclipse  ­­ celestial shadow play  enjoyed by many denizens  of planet Earth last  Saturday. Recorded near  Wildon, Austria, the picture  is a composite of two  exposures; a relatively  short exposure to feature  the lunar surface and a  longer exposure to capture  background stars in the  constellation Leo.  Completely immersed in  Earth's cone­shaped  shadow during the total  eclipse phase, the lunar  surface is still illuminated  by sunlight, reddened and  refracted into the dark  shadow region by a dusty  atmosphere. As a result,  familiar details of the  Moon's nearside are easy  to pick out, including the  smooth lunar mare and the  large ray crater Tycho. In  this telescopic view, the  background stars are faint  and most would be  invisible to the naked eye.
  7. 7. In October of 1846, William  Lassell was observing the  newly discovered planet  Neptune. He was attempting  to confirm his observation,  made just the previous  week, that Neptune had a  ring. But this time he  discovered that Neptune had  a satellite as well. Lassell  soon proved that the ring  was a product of his new  telescope's distortion, but  the satellite Triton remained.  The above picture of Triton  was taken in 1989 by the  only spacecraft ever to pass  Triton: Voyager 2. Voyager 2  found fascinating terrain, a  thin atmosphere, and even  evidence for ice volcanoes  on this world of peculiar orbit  and spin. Ironically, Voyager  2 also confirmed the  existence of complete thin  rings around Neptune ­ but  these would have been quite  invisible to Lassell!
  8. 8. The Spirit rover attacked  Mars again in 2005  September. What might  look, above, like a  military attack, though,  was once again just a  scientific one ­ Spirit was  instructed to closely  inspect some interesting  rocks near the summit of  Husband Hill. Spirit's  Panoramic Camera  captured the rover's  Instrument Deployment  Device above as moved  to get a closer look at an  outcrop of rocks named  Hillary. The Spirit rover,  and its twin rover  Opportunity, have now  been exploring the red  planet for over three  years. Both Spirit and  Opportunity have found  evidence that parts of  Mars were once wet.
  9. 9. Spewed from a volcano, a  complex plume rises over 300  kilometers above the horizon  of Jupiter's moon Io in this  image from cameras onboard  the New Horizons spacecraft.  The volcano, Tvashtar, is  marked by the bright glow  (about 1 o'clock) at the  moon's edge, beyond the  terminator or night/day  shadow line. The shadow of  Io cuts across the plume itself.  Also capturing stunning  details on the dayside  surface, the high resolution  image was recorded when the  spacecraft was 2.3 million  kilometers from Io. Later it  was combined with lower  resolution color data by astro­  imager Sean Walker to  produce this sharp portrait of  the solar system's most active  moon. Outward bound at  almost 23 kilometers per  second, the New Horizons  spacecraft should cross the  orbit of Saturn in June next  year, and is ultimately  destined to encounter Pluto in  2015.
  10. 10. io  Jupiter  Mean Radius: 1821.46  km  Mass: 0.0149 (Earth=1)  Density: 3.55 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.183  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 1.769  (Earth days)  Rotation Period: 1.769  (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 422,600 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.004
  11. 11. Swooping below Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft spied several strange wonders. Visible in the distance are  some of the many complex rings that orbit the Solar System's second largest planet. In the foreground  looms the gigantic world itself, covered with white dots that are clouds high in Saturn's thick atmosphere.  Saturn's atmosphere is so thick that only clouds are visible. At the very South Pole of Saturn lies a huge  vortex that is a hurricane­like storm showing no sign of dissipating. The robotic Cassini spacecraft took the  above image in January from about one million kilometers out, resolving details about 50 kilometers across.
  12. 12. Asteroid Itokawa. The unusual asteroid has been visited recently by the Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa  that has been documenting its unusual structure and mysterious lack of craters. Recent analyses of the  border regions between smooth and rugged sections of Itokawa indicate that jostling of the asteroid might  be creating segregation between large and small rocks near the surface, like the Brazil nut effect. In late  2005, Hayabusa actually touched down on one of the smooth patches, dubbed the MUSES Sea, and  collected soil samples that are to be returned to Earth for analysis. Hayabusa will start its three­year long  return trip to Earth this month. Computer simulations show that 500­meter asteroid Itokawa may impact the  Earth within the next few million years.
  13. 13. Small Worlds: Ceres and Vesta: Ceres and Vesta are, respectively, only around 950 kilometers and 530 kilometers in  diameter ­ about the size of Texas and Arizona. But they are two of the largest of over 100,000 minor bodies orbiting in the  main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. These remarkably detailed Hubble Space Telescope images show brightness  and color variations across the surface of the two small worlds. The variations could represent large scale surface features  or areas of different compositon. The Hubble image data will help astronomers plan for a visit by the asteroid­hopping Dawn  spacecraft, scheduled for launch on July 7 and intended to orbit first Vesta and then Ceres after a four year interplanetary  cruise. Though Shakespeare might not have been impressed, nomenclature introduced by the International Astronomical  Union in 2006 classifies nearly spherical Ceres as a dwarf planet.
  14. 14. Mercury  Mean Radius: 2439.7  km  Mass: 0.055  (Earth=1)  Density: 5.43  (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.284  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 87.97  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  58.65 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 0.387 au  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.206
  15. 15. Mars  Mean Radius:  3389.5 km  Mass: 0.108  (Earth=1)  Density: 3.94  (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.380  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 686.98  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  1.026 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 1.524 au  Eccentricity of  Orbit: 0.093
  16. 16. Ganymede  Jupiter  Mean Radius:  2632.345 km  Mass: 0.0249  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.93 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.145  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 7.155  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  7.155 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 1,070,000 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.002
  17. 17. Callisto  Jupiter  Mean Radius: 2409.3  km  Mass: 0.0179 (Earth=1)  Density: 1.851 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.124  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 16.689  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  16.689 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 1,883,000 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.007
  18. 18. Thetys  Saturn  Mean Radius: 529.8  km  Mass: 0.000104  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.0 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.018  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 1.888  (Earth days)  Rotation Period: 1.888  (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 294,670 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  (0)
  19. 19. Dione  Saturn  Mean Radius: 560  km  Mass: 0.000176  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.44  (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.023  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 2.737  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  2.737 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 377,420 km  Eccentricity of  Orbit: 0.002
  20. 20. Rhea  Saturn  Mean Radius: 764 km  Mass: 0.000387 (Earth=1)  Density: 1.24 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.029 (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 4.518 (Earth  days)  Rotation Period: 4.518  (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of Orbit:  527,100 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.001
  21. 21. Iapetus  Saturn  Mean Radius: 718 km  Mass: 0.000266  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.02 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.024  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 79.331  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  79.331 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 3,560,800 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.028
  22. 22. Ariel  Uranus  Mean Radius: 578.9  km  Mass: 0.00021  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.56  (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.021  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 2.520  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  2.520 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 192,000 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.003
  23. 23. Umbriel  Uranus  Mean Radius: 584.7 km  Mass: 0.000196  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.52 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.022  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 4.144  (Earth days)  Rotation Period: 4.144  (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 267,000 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.005
  24. 24. Titania  Uranus  Mean Radius: 788.9  km  Mass: 0.000504  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.70 (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.029  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 8.706  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  8.706 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 438,000 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.002
  25. 25. Oberon  Uranus  Mean Radius: 761.4  km  Mass: 0.00051  (Earth=1)  Density: 1.64  (g/cm^3)  Gravity: 0.028  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 13.463  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  13.463 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 583,400 km  Eccentricity of  Orbit: 0.001
  26. 26. Trition  Neptune  Mean Radius: 1352.6  km  Mass: 0.0036  (Earth=1)  Density: 2.054  (g/cm^3)  Gravity: (0.077)  (Earth=1)  Orbit Period: 5.88  (Earth days)  Rotation Period:  5.88 (Earth days)  Semimajor Axis of  Orbit: 355,000 km  Eccentricity of Orbit:  0.000

×