Nuclear Power

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Nuclear Power

  1. 1. NUCLEAR POWER Generation project on nuclear energy by Kyla Duncan
  2. 2. HISTORY OF NUCLEAR POWER
  3. 3. GENERAL HISTORY • The science of atomic radiation, nuclear fission, and atomic radiation was developed from 1895 to 1945, especially in the last six of those years • Over the period of 1939 to 1945, the majority of the development was focused on the atomic bomb • From 1945, attention was mostly given to harnessing Nuclear Energy into a controlled fashion for naval propulsion and for creating electricity • Since the year 1956, the prime focus has been on the technological evolution of reliable nuclear power plants
  4. 4. HOW IT IS GENERATED
  5. 5. HOW NUCLEAR ENERGY IS PRODUCED • Nuclear Energy is the power produced during a nuclear reaction • Nuclear energy that is produced naturally is the energy produced from the sun and the stars, which releases light and heat and warms the planet • Nuclear energy produced by fission is the process of splitting the nuclei of atoms (usually uranium atoms) by shooting neutrons at them • Nuclear fusion, on the other hand, is the process of joining the nuclei of two atoms together. This is the method the sun uses to produce heat, as well as the method used to develop the Hydrogen Bomb.
  6. 6. HOW DOES NUCLEAR POWER WORK?
  7. 7. PROS OF NUCLEAR POWER • Nuclear power plants don't produce smoke • Nuclear power is considered carbon-free and produces more electricity than other renewables like solar and wind • Nuclear power plants produce more kilowatts than coal, wind or solar for fewer cents • Produces more clean energy than wind or solar once it's up and running • Aren't dependent on wind or sun to produce electricity
  8. 8. CONS OF NUCLEAR POWER • The significant issue of radioactive waste, which isn't biodegradable and is extremely dangerous • Public concerns over health, environmental worries and fears about the security of nuclear facilities • Long-term storage of nuclear waste is expensive and dangerous • Concerns that radical governments might develop nuclear weapons runs deep • One square mile (2.6 square kilometers) of water 14 feet (4.2 meters) deep goes through a typical two-unit reactor every day • Larger animals like sea turtles and seals can become trapped against filters and drown
  9. 9. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CANADA • British Columbia has never had a nuclear power plant or an uranium mine • Canada operates 18 nuclear power plants • 16 in Ontario, and one each in New Brunswick and Quebec • They are all CANDU reactors, (CANada Deuterium Uranium) a Pressurized Water Reactor design that has been exported to a number of countries including South Korea, China, India, Argentina, Romania and Pakistan • A plant's 30 to 40 year service life is determined by the wear and tear many essential parts in the plant will suffer over that time period, which could potentially compromise the safe operating of the plant and the safety of its workers
  10. 10. THE COST FOR EACH KILOWATT/HOUR
  11. 11. WORKS CONSULTED • Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power • Google sites: https://sites.google.com/a/ncsu.edu/nuclear-energy/history • History: http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Current-and-FutureGeneration/Outline-History-of-Nuclear-Energy/ • How it is produced: http://www.learnstuff.com/how-nuclear-energy-isproduced/ • Pros and Cons: http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/topics/10-proscons-nuclear-power.htm

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