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Digital Immigration: Engaging Technology Avoiders

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Presented at the Puget Sound UXPA 2014 World Usability Day Conference at The University of Washington

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I will explore the relationship between the real world and those people who are NOT Digital Natives, how we can begin to engage them, win them over, and drive technology adoption.

I will explore real world stories of technology adoption and the motivations that drove it, the data behind it all, as well as suggest three areas of change in our interactions with digital immigrants in order to get a greater return on usability results, and research.

This talk should also have wider implications on our day-to-day interactions and relationships, benefitting our professional careers and personal lives, which I will explore briefly.

This talk will be an expanded hypothesis based upon already existent contextual work from the following:

Berkman Center for Internet and Society - Harvard University
http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/research/youthandmedia/digitalnatives

(Azzia Walker, B.A.(Digital Native) & Ofer Zur, Ph.D.(Digital Immigrant)):
http://www.zurinstitute.com/digital_divide.html

Published in: Technology
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Digital Immigration: Engaging Technology Avoiders

  1. 1. Digital Immigration: Engaging Technology Avoiders
  2. 2. “Technology is teaching us to be human again.” – Simon Mainwaring
  3. 3. 3 Steps To Win Over A Technology Avoider
  4. 4. 1 Use existing cues from previous experiences
  5. 5. 2 Bridge the Uncanny Valley by making it more human
  6. 6. 3 Build a familiar solution, in order to build trust
  7. 7. ?
  8. 8. ?
  9. 9. What is a digital immigrant?
  10. 10. A brief historical survey of the digital information age 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 First Personal Computers Internet Era of Apple Browsing Bulletin Board Services (BBS) Video Game Revolution Dotcom Bubble Era of Social Media First Search Engines
  11. 11. A brief historical survey of the digital information age 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line
  12. 12. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants A brief historical survey of the digital information age Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line
  13. 13. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants A brief historical survey of the digital information age Digital Intermediates Digital Natives AKA Technology Adoption Lifecycle
  14. 14. Digital Immigrants Digital Intermediates Digital Natives A brief historical survey of the digital information age
  15. 15. Name: Judith Ortega Occupation: Retired School Teacher Age: None of your business
  16. 16. Digital Immigrants Digital Intermediates Digital Natives 1974 2014
  17. 17. Digital Immigrants 1954 1964 1974
  18. 18. Digital Immigrants 1954 1964 1974 Not actual birth photo
  19. 19. 2014 Digital Intermediates Digital Natives
  20. 20. Translation: Remember the IESS delivers one universal key and with it access to all our services.
  21. 21. Is this the type of adoption we desire?
  22. 22. 2 Ways to change avoiders into adopters
  23. 23. 1 Natural Adoption
  24. 24. 2 Forced Adoption
  25. 25. Once a technology avoider consciously adopts a piece of technology, the experience has already made itself ubiquitous in society And the avoiders are forced to use it
  26. 26. 1. Natural Adoption 2. Forced Adoption *Work on these names
  27. 27. Traversing the Uncanny Valley
  28. 28. “Any sufficiently advanced technology is equivalent to magic.” – Sir Arthur C. Clarke
  29. 29. un·can·ny Peculiarly unsettling, eerie. So keen and perceptive as to seem beyond what is normal or natural.
  30. 30. Technology becomes uncanny when it becomes unplugged from human experience
  31. 31. http://fakeui.tumblr.com/
  32. 32. Doctor Who, season 2, ep 5: Rise of the Cybermen
  33. 33. Is that… Windows? Firefly, e11
  34. 34. electrifyingtimes.com
  35. 35. Technology adoption is built upon known interaction cues built from our own human experience
  36. 36. by Miguel Oliva Márquez
  37. 37. by Miguel Oliva Márquez
  38. 38. These cues have either been adopted from previous technology or are part of our current knowledge
  39. 39. Emerging Cues 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line
  40. 40. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line Well known cues
  41. 41. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line Well known cues
  42. 42. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line Well known cues
  43. 43. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line cue overlap
  44. 44. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line cue overlap
  45. 45. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line Cues known only to Digital Immigrants
  46. 46. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Cues known only to Digital Intermediates Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line
  47. 47. 1974 1984 1994 2004 2014 Digital Immigrants Emerging Cues Digital Intermediates Digital Natives Peak Adoption Line Cues known only to Digital Natives
  48. 48. What was blocking Judith from adopting technology?
  49. 49. No Cues = No Human Experience
  50. 50. No Barrier to Entry
  51. 51. The key to technology avoidance is to bridge the gap between need and trust. And that is accomplished by making the experience as human as possible.
  52. 52. note: Digital Natives will learn to do fundamentally different things than digital immigrants
  53. 53. Because Natives are accustomed to fundamentally different ways of doing things, they [also] forget the associated cues we receive from previous technology that immigrants already have as current knowledge
  54. 54. “Surveys conducted by a number of university researchers show that "digital natives" appear to have surprisingly superficial understanding of new communication technologies, especially the how and why that underlie them” Prensky, 2001; Tapscott, 1998 http://ccnmtl.columbia.edu/enhanced/primers/digital_natives.html
  55. 55. When immigrant knowledge is the cue for native technology
  56. 56. When technology avoiders clash with the natives
  57. 57. Online Poll: “What technology do you regularly find yourself using today, that you promised you would never adopt in years past? And why?”
  58. 58. 65%
  59. 59. “Communications tools don’t get socially interesting until they get technologically boring.” – Clay Shirky
  60. 60. 3 Steps To Winning Over A Technology Avoider • Use existing cues from previous technology • Bridge the Uncanny Valley by making it more human • Build a familiar solution, in order to build user trust
  61. 61. Thank You
  62. 62. Kevin Schumacher schubox.com @schubox

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