Leadership issue brief p1 complete_draft

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This is a summary of our Phase 1 findings. An unpolished draft, we are sharing for those interested in the topic or project.

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Leadership issue brief p1 complete_draft

  1. 1.      LEADERSHIP IN WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENTDRAFT Phase 1 HighlightsSpring 2011  By  its  very  nature  the  “work”  of  workforce  development—leveraging  resources,  talent,  and  ideas  from  multiple  stakeholders;  producing  demand-­‐driven  solutions  to  fluctuating  problems;  and  finding  creative  ways  to  allocate  a  shrinking  resources  to  meet  growing  expectations  of  workers  skills  and  productivity—hinges  on  the  strength  and  ingenuity  of  workforce  leaders.    Despite  the  critical  role  that  leaders  play  in  managing  partnerships,  responding  to  economic  shocks,  and  adjusting  to  shifts  in  labor  demand,  we  know  little  about  the  specific  ways  in  which  workforce  leaders  meet  their  challenges.    Where  is  leadership  found  in  workforce  development?  Does  the  structure  of  workforce  development  policy  or  administration  present  particular  demands  for  workforce  leaders?  How  do  leaders  meet  these  demands?    What  skills  or  resources  do  leaders  utilize  when  addressing  these  challenges?  To  answer  these  questions,  and  many  others,  we  went  directly  to  the  source.    In  late  2010,  through  a  series  of  group  conversations  with  national  workforce  organizations,  we  consulted  with  88  leaders  in  workforce  development  to  find  out  exactly  how  leaders  do  their  jobs.        As  expected,  our  respondents  offered  a  variety  of  different  interpretations  of  the  shape  and  purpose  of  workforce  development  leadership.  More  surprising,  however,  was  the  degree  to  which  these  varied  leaders  shared  a  similar  outlook  on  their  role,  their  constraints,  and  the  resources  needed  to  get  the  job  done.    In  many  ways,  their  responses  emphasized  three  themes—collaboration,  fluctuation,  and  transformation.    In  everything  they  do,  workforce  leaders  facilitate  partnerships,  manage  change,  and  strive  to  transform  the  scope  and  breadth  of  the  workforce  system.    Specifically,  we  identified  the  following  12  “highlights”  reflecting  their  shared  perspectives  on  workforce  leadership.    These  are  not  research  findings.  Rather,  as  a  part  of  our  commitment  to  sharing  information  as  we  collect  it,  we  offer  this  document  as  a  summary  of  themes  that  emerged  from  our  Phase  1  work  (group  discussions),  and  will  inform  our  approach  to  Phase  2  (individual  interviews).        
  2. 2.       1. We-adership Many  of  the  respondents  in  our  focus  groups  emphasized  how  the  collaborative  nature  of   workforce  development  framed  and  shaped  their  work  as  leaders  in  communities.    While  many   do  work  in  hierarchically  structured  organizations,  workforce  leaders  also  operate  within   networks  of  public,  private,  and  non-­‐profit  organizations  across  a  range  of  policy  domains.  As   one  workforce  leader  explained,       “We  bring  together  different  players  involved  in  workforce  development,  from  tech   schools  to  trade  associations  and  state  government  agencies.  We  are  conveners.  So   much  depends  on  the  willingness  to  collaborate."       Workforce  leaders  stated  repeatedly  that  convening  diverse  partners  is  the  most  significant   work  they  do.  Workforce  leaders  employ  a  range  of  tactics,  from  developing  informal   relationships  to  formalizing  partnerships,  for  managing  these  coalitions.    Leaders  also  stressed   that  part  of  being  a  strong  leader  in  a  collaborative  is  knowing  when  not  to  lead.  Operating  as  a   leader  within  a  coalition  of  other  leaders  sometimes  requires  handing  over  the  reins  to  partners   or  junior  staff.           Why  do  workforce  leaders  devote  their  efforts  to  enhancing  collaboration?          Many  leaders  see  themselves  in  the  innovation  business  –and  new  ideas  come  from  the   diverse  networks  many  leaders  are  trying  to  build.      The  work  of  workforce  leaders  has  shifted  from  narrow  concerns,  such  as  placing   unemployed  workers  in  jobs,  addressing  specific  skills  gaps,  and  promoting  work   readiness,  to  broader  community  priorities  like  regional  competitiveness,  poverty   alleviation,  or  talent  development.        Workforce  development  is  no  longer  just  about  problem-­‐solving;  its  also  about  strength   building.  Tackling  these  broader  agendas  requires  collaborative  effort.      Collaborative  leaders  dont  just  work  with  other  colleagues  as  leaders,  they  encourage   others  to  rise  to  new  challenges.     2. 31 Flavors We  found  that  workforce  leaders  advance  many  issues,  at  different  scales,  within  unique   community  ecosystems.  While  job  placement,  skills  attainment,  and  wage  increases  anchor   workforce  development  policies  and  programs,  the  work  takes  on  many  forms—a  significant   change  from  a  decade  ago.     When  asked  about  their  priorities  and  goals,  workforce  leaders  identified  issues  ranging  from   broadband  access  to  entrepreneurship,  the  downturn  in  youth  employment  opportunities,  rural   poverty  and  green  jobs.    The  breadth,  depth,  and  focus  of  their  work  is  varied,  the  partnerships   unique,  and  the  context  diverse  and  ever  changing.  As  one  WIB  Director  described:       2    
  3. 3.   “Expectations  are  greater  today  as  the  publics  understanding  of  education  and   economic  issues  has  increased.  Its  a  positive  change.  Our  agendas  are  bigger,  even  if   not  always  realistic."     More  than  ever,  workforce  leaders  aspire  to  be  change  agents.    Successful  leaders  tend  to  also   be  students  of  economic  development,  education  policy,  sustainability  and  other  disciplines.   They  are  eager  to  share  information  with  colleagues  or  peers  in  order  to  ascertain  which   interventions  work,  under  what  circumstances,  and  by  what  means,  across  different   communities  with  shared  priorities.       3. Alignment One  of  the  byproducts  of  an  ever-­‐changing  economy  is  the  need  to  continually  align  and  realign   programs,  policies,  and  partnerships—and  to  accommodate  new  approaches  and  stakeholders.     While  partnerships  with  individuals  and  organizations  are  a  critical  component  of  any  effort  to   support  industry  expansion,  promote  educational  attainment,  or  alleviate  poverty,  alignment   requires  more  than  just  communicating,  coordinating,  or  meeting.     Here  are  a  few  ways  workforceLeaders  are  making  it  happen:      Establishing  and  working  toward  measurable  goals  that  are  tied  to  shared  strategies   based  on  common  assumptions  about  the  causes  of  the  current  state  and  what  would   best  improve  it  (whether  the  work  occurs  collaboratively  is  secondary);    Using  incentives  that  reward  progress  appropriately  (at  multiple  levels);    Investing  time,  resources,  and  expertise  in  ways  that  are  widely  perceived  to  be  "fair",   equitable,  and  in  the  public  interest;  and    Building  trust  beyond  single  individuals  (most  often  leaders)  of  collaborating   organizations  to  support  lasting  partnerships  and  strengthen  social  networks.         One  workforce  board  executive  observed,       “Diverse  partners  add  the  resources  and  expertise  we  do  not  have  and  the  reverse  is   also  true.  You  need  partnerships  to  take  on  the  hard  issues.  Knowing  how  to  leverage   them  is  an  important  aspect  of  leadership."       4. Impact One  clear  observation  from  our  interviews  is  that  workforce  leaders  believe  that  workforce   development  is  more  than  just  the  sum  of  its  parts.  To  be  sure,  workforce  leaders  develop  and   run  systems  and  programs  that  achieve  their  intended  performance  targets.  However,  those   targets  reflect  only  a  fraction  of  the  work  leaders  do  every  day  or  the  impact  they  have  on  their   communities.     During  our  interviews,  the  subject  of  impact  was  both  a  key  point  of  pride  for  leaders  who  could   articulate  numerous  significant  achievements  they  had  helped  advance  in  their  communities,   and  a  source  of  frustration.  For  many,  the  desired  impact  is  largely  unrealized,  un-­‐reflected  in     3    
  4. 4.   performance  measures,  or  ignored  during  contract  negotiations.  Despite  “high  scores”  on   performance  reports,  many  leaders  expressed  frustration  that  existing  performance  measures   are  often  assumed  to  reflect  the  totality  of  workforce  development  activity.  "Metrics  matter   and  they  should  be  strategic,”  argued  one  participant,  they  should  be  “linked  to  a collaboratively  negotiated  community-­‐wide  strategy  and  owned  by  multiple  stakeholders  who   can  hold  each  other  accountable.  Then,  they  are  powerful."         We  found  that:      Local  leaders,  mayors  in  particular,  seek  results.  They  encourage  other  leaders  and   board  members  to  focus  on  impact  and  outcomes,  not  just  program  compliance.    Many  workforce  board  members  themselves  champion  the  focus  on  impact  and   outcomes,  working  with  agencies,  foundations,  firms,  and  other  community  partners  to   align  investments  around  strategic  intent.    Establishing  shared  goals  and  metrics  that  go  beyond  programs  can  help  scale  (and   embed)  broader  community  change.  But  the  process  matters  as  much  as  the  metrics.     5. The Global Village   Much  of  the  work  of  workforce  leaders  centers  on  managing  and  accommodating  the  effects  of   an  increasingly  global  economy.    Local  firms  and  their  workers  are  increasingly  competing  with   those  all  over  the  world.    For  workforce  leaders  this  means  that  the  nature  of  workforce   training  and  preparedness  must  reflect  not  just  local  or  national  trends,  but  international   advances  as  well.    However,  as  local  labor  markets  reach  further  and  further,  the  pool  of   potential  peers  and  collaborators  grows.       Workforce  leaders  are  learning  from  neighboring  jurisdictions  and  peer  communities  anywhere   in  the  country,  anywhere  in  the  world.    They  understand  that  their  communities  are  no  longer   competing  with  neighbors,  but  with  regions  or  nations.    To  facilitate  better  transnational   partnerships:      Many  workforce  leaders  are  working  with  neighboring  communities  or  states  in   organizing  learning  visits  to  peer  communities.    Workforce  leaders  are  also  trading  information  and  interacting  with  international  peers   –  OECD-­‐based  analysts  and  innovation  experts  from  Asia  and  the  Pacific  Rim  who  attend   workforce  association  meetings  and  events  with  increasing  frequency,  for  example.    Exploring  web-­‐conferencing,  social  media,  and  other  distance  technologies  to  make   national  and  international  collaboration  easier.       This  sentiment,  expressed  by  a  workforce  board  executive,  was  a  common  one:     "Technology  and  innovation  are  key.    We  need  to  keep  in  mind  that  we  are  part  of  a   global  economy.  The  world  is  bigger  than  the  community  we  live  or  work  in."       4    
  5. 5.   6. Ubiquitous Leadership In  general,  technological  advances  have  loosened  restrictions  on  where  (and  with  whom)  work   occurs.    While  these  advances  have  opened  up  opportunities  for  innovation,  they  have  also   increased  our  sense  of  immediacy.    Rapid  responses  are  not  just  possible,  they  are  expected.       As  temporal  and  geographic  boundaries  on  employment  and  training  opportunities  shift  (or   dissolve),  and  as  opportunities  for  collaboration  expand,  location  becomes  less  relevant.     Working  in  ways  that  span  these  boundaries  and  change  frequently  requires  a  specific  set  of   organizational  and  managerial  skills.         There  is  nothing  “fixed”  or  “typical”  about  the  type  of  individuals  or  organizations  working  with   workforce  leaders.    Strong  leaders  find  the  potential  for  collaboration  in  a  variety  of  players— public,  private,  individuals  or  organizations,  small  firms,  large  industries.  It  is  the  role  of  the   workforce  leader  to  bridge,  blend  and  link  these  diverse  organizational  or  institutional  settings.         Planning  and  doing  are  no  longer  linear,  sequential,  or  long-­‐term.  Some  partnerships  emerge  to   resolve  short-­‐term  problems,  while  others  operate  on  longer  time  horizons.  And  although   strategic  planning  is  essential  and  increasingly  complex,  a  great  deal  of  work  is  done  while   without  the  benefit  of  extensive  deliberation.  The  challenge  for  many  workforce  leaders  is   attempting  to  impose  a  structure  and  strategy  on  something  that  is  fluid  and  in  flux.           One  respondent  exclaimed:       “Leadership  has  to  see  a  greater  range  of  changes  coming  and  deal  with  them  faster  and   better  than  ever  before.  We  do  what  we  can  to  anticipate  change  –  and  make  sure  what   we  design  is  sustainable  after  the  flurry  is  over."       7. Workforce Leaders Wear Many Hats Not  surprisingly,  in  order  to  manage  all  of  these  geographic,  temporal,  and  stakeholder   fluctuations,  workforce  leaders  need  to  take  on  a  variety  of  roles.    In  many  instances,   participants  who  held  the  same  position—and  shared  the  same  general  job  description—did   vastly  different  work.    In  many  ways  their  work  is  contingent  upon  resources,  players,  priorities,   and  the  jurisdiction  for  which  they  have  responsibility.    This  work  can  vary  across  workforce   leaders—even  within  the  same  state,  and  also  over  time,  within  an  individual’s  tenure  as  a   workforce  leader.       There  are  drawbacks  to  role  fluidity.  Many  of  our  respondents  candidly  expressed  concern  over   the  disconnect  among  partners  understanding  of  each  others  roles,  priorities,  commitments,   and  statutory  responsibilities.    Explains  one  participant,  “[i]ts  critical  for  people  to  work   together  across  boundaries,  constituencies,  but  we  still  have  issues  of  organizations  not   understanding  what  each  other  do...how  they  fit  together.”  For  example,  state  workforce  board   members  or  staff  can  perceive  local  workforce  investment  boards  as  uncooperative  if  they   resist  a  particular  state  strategy.  However,  in  these  cases  local  leaders  may  be  answering  to  the     5    
  6. 6.   needs  of  local  elected  officials  with  a  set  of  statutory  and  fiduciary  responsibilities  or  goals  that   differ  from  those  at  the  state  level.         Role  clarity  and  frequent  and  open  discussion  about  risks  were  named  by  workforce  leaders  as   critical  to  a  healthy  foundation  for  building  effective  partnerships  within  and  across   jurisdictions.    Although  it  can  be  challenging  to  manage,  many  view  the  diversity  of  roles,   organizations  and  partners  as  a  source  of  strength.    If  workforce  leaders  are  trained  to   anticipate  and  respond  to  change  in  their  own  jobs,  they  can  more  readily  assist  others  in  the   workforce  system  to  do  the  same.  In  the  end  this  means  a  more  responsive,  demand-­‐driven   workforce  system.     8. Life-long Learning It  seems  obvious  that  workforce  development  is  about  talent-­‐development  and  training   individuals  to  occupy  a  range  of  different  jobs.    Increasingly,  however,  workforce  development   is  also  about  training  individuals  and  organizations  to  participate  effectively  as  labor  market   intermediaries,  employers,  trainers,  and  workforce  champions  themselves—to  become   meaningful  proponents  of  career  advancement.       These  were  some  of  the  things  we  learned  abut  how  leaders  build  this  capacity  in  their   communities:      Work  force  leaders  are  actively  monitoring  economic  and  industry  trends  in  an  effort  to   ascertain  their  impact  on  learners,  workers,  the  workplace,  and  their  communities,  and   try  to  stay  ahead  of  the  curve.        They  are  also  tracking  how  organizations  train,  how  people  learn,  and  which  resources   are  becoming  necessary  or  irrelevant.    In  many  ways  how  we  learn  is  becoming  just  as   important  as  what  we  learn.        Effective  workforce  leaders  spend  time  learning  what  other  partners  do  and  how  they   work,  and  sharing  what  they  know.    They  seek  to  maximize  partners’  contributions  in   service  of  solving  community  challenges  and  minimize  the  threat  of  current  and  future   risk.        Many  of  our  workforce  leaders  are  exploring  web-­‐based  "schools"  for  learners  not   suited  to  traditional  educational  environments  and  whether  institution-­‐based  learning  is   becoming  outmoded.    Some  are  tapping  into  community  organizing  as  a  cost-­‐effective   way  of  extending  the  reach  of  learning  opportunities  to  more  homes  and  communities.         An  association  executive  and  scholar  observed:     "We  are  trying  to  build  an  understanding  of  workforce  and  how  systems  work  at  all   levels  in  our  community,  but  we  know  that  those  systems  themselves  need  to   change."           6    
  7. 7.   9. Many “Need-to-Knows” The  workforce  leaders  with  whom  we  spoke  listed  an  almost  endless  number  of  skills,   characteristics,  attributes,  and  competencies  critical  to  their  effectiveness  as  leaders.  We   clustered  them  into  four  categories:      Strategy  (goal-­‐setting,  prioritizing,  planning,  convening)    Data  analysis  (collecting,  managing,  understanding  data;  seeing  challenges  and  trends   and  their  causes)    Interpersonal  skills  (team-­‐building,  organizational  development  and  management,   interagency  collaboration)    Public  relations  or  marketing  (making  meaning  out  of  data,  inspire  action)     This  list  continues  to  evolve  and  expand.    We  identified  emerging  skill-­‐set  requirements  in  each   of  these  traditional  categories.     First,  the  process  of  strategy  development  itself  is  changing.  More  iterative,  impact-­‐focused   models  are  taking  precedence.  Leaders  need  to  know  how  to  work  within  this  new  more  agile   framework  and  not  just  the  traditional  five-­‐year  plan.     Second,  firms  and  organization  of  all  kinds,  including  governments,  are  opening  up  their  data.   This  changes  the  role  of  data  analysts  and  knowledge  brokers.    Increasingly,  information   brokers  will  not  just  share  data,  they  will  be  called  upon  to  make  meaning  out  of  it,  and  to   facilitate  its  use  by  other  organizations  and  groups.  Workforce  organizations  are  already  facing   pressure  to  improve  their  data  and  technology  presence  and  train  community  organizations   and  citizens  in  how  to  use  the  data  sets  they  make  available.  They  will  likely  also  be  called  upon   to  aggregate  and  synthesize  many  different  types  of  analyses.  However,  more  eyes  on  all  this   dates  may  be  better  insight  and  intelligence  to  inform  their  strategies  and  programs.       Third,  workforce  leaders  must  develop  the  ability  to  communicate  and  collaborate  with   partners  and  engage  the  public  in  new  ways.  New  technologies  make  large-­‐scale  engagement   easier  than  ever  before,  but  using  them  well  takes  time  and  requires  discipline.  Many   workforce  leaders  expressed  trepidation  about  new  technologies,  tools,  and  approaches,  but   understood  the  need  to  engage  with  them.  Most  are  experimenting  with  some  combination  of   applications,  from  Facebook  and  Twitter  to  LinkedIn,  even  their  own  custom-­‐made  social   networking  platforms.       Finally,  in  their  role  as  communicators,  workforce  leaders  need  to  learn  how  to  tell  effective   stories.  Effective  leaders  recognize  the  power  of  narrative  to  inspire  positive  change  and  help   people  make  informed  choices  on  their  own.    Fundamentally,  our  participants  told  us,   workforce  development  is  about  people—people  teaching,  people  hiring,  and  people  getting   jobs.       7    
  8. 8.   This  sentiment  was  a  common  one  during  our  conversations:     “Narratives  really  matter  and  engagement  matters.  If  workforce  boards  are  places   where  people  come  to  talk  and  think  than  they  play  a  very  important  role  in  their   communities.”         10. Tomorrow’s Leaders Workforce  leaders  are  pointing  to  gaps  in  federal,  state,  and  local  level  positions,  noting  that   the  workforce  development  field  is  experiencing  the  same  generational  turnover  occurring  in   the  broader  labor  market  –  a  situation  compounded  by  too  little  attention  to  diversity  and   succession  planning  within  the  field.         However,  as  with  many  of  the  challenges  raised  in  the  focus  groups,  workforce  leaders  viewed   leadership  training  and  recruitment  as  an  opportunity  to  promote  system-­‐wide  improvements.       Noted  one  agency  leader,     "We  really  need  to  grow  the  people  coming  behind  us.  Large  transitions  are  just   beginning  to  occur  and  cultivating  new  leaders  could  be  very  powerful."       The  leaders  we  spoke  with  were  enthusiastic  about  the  emergence  of  younger  and  more   diverse  leaders  in  the  profession.    They  described  the  importance  of  leadership  recruitment  not   as  personnel  replacement,  but  as  an  opportunity  to  redefine  what  leadership  looks  like  in  an   ever-­‐changing  labor  market.    But,  to maximize  the  success  of  this  transition,  workforce  leaders   stressed  the  need  for  mechanisms,  models  and  tools  to  facilitate  learning  and  training  and  to   support  modern  leadership  development  practices  in  the  workplace.   An  agency  director  lamented:     “One  of  our  biggest  concerns  has  to  do  with  the  number  of  people  reaching  retirement   age...how  do  we  institutionalize  the  knowledge  and  skills  they  have?”       11. Training without a Net Our  respondents  raised  concerns  that  so  few  opportunities  exist  for  the  sort  of  knowledge   exchange  required  to  help  tomorrow’s  leaders  succeed.    While  workforce  leaders  are  aware  of   the  need  to  be  forward-­‐thinking  in  their  approach  to  leadership  development,  they  feel  they   have  few  resources  to  be  forward-­‐reaching.  Different  people  need  different  kinds  of   development  opportunities.  The  field  needs  to  respond  in  a  variety  of  ways,  but  resource   constraints  are  real.         Some  leaders  reported  having  surveyed  existing  training  models.  They  found,  on  the  whole,   that  key  programs  they  took  advantage  of  no  longer  exist.  Programs  in  the  field  emphasize   technical  skills  or  “effective  practices”,  but  focus  less  on  leadership  development  and   innovation.    As  one  leader  noted,       8    
  9. 9.   “We  have  to  build  a  new  understanding  of  workforce  in  our  communities.  We  have  on   old  pipeline  sense  of  how  people  make  it  through  ...  Maybe  leadership  is  adaptability  –   the  capacity  to  ramp  up  and  learn  new  things  quickly."     Workforce  leaders  are  also  attempting  to  develop  leaders  in  partner  organizations  and   industries  as  a  way  of  preparing  them  for  board  membership  or  other  workforce  leadership   positions.    Training  models  used  for  these  individuals  will  be  substantively  different  than   training  for  future  leaders  who  are  already  well  versed  in  the  language  of  workforce   development.       Finally,  whole  new  sets  of  issues  linked  to  workforce  development  not  currently  addressed  in   models  of  workforce  leadership  training  –  sustainability,  social  innovation,  entrepreneurship,   for  example.    In  general,  workforce  leaders  expressed  interest  in  more  varied  development   opportunities  that  were  specific  to  the  field  of  workforce  development,  both  to  deepen  leaders’   professional  networks  and  because  workforce  leaders  see  development  as  a  competency  the   field  should  cultivate.     12. Real Issues The  world  of  workforce  development  leadership  may  appear  to  be  noisy  and  chaotic.    Leaders   juggle  many  balls,  wear  different  hats,  and  manage  a  host  of  conflicts.  However  the  individuals   we  spoke  with  were  clear  about  the  very  real  issues  at  stake  in  their  work.    One  leader   remarked  with  pride,       “Leaders  do  real  things.  Last  year,  we  put  15,000  young  people  to  work.  The  need  is   70,000,  but  now  everyone  knows  it  and  a  partnership  is  taking  root.”       While  the  work  of  workforce  leaders  may  vary,  their  drive  was  surprisingly  consistent.  Over  and   over  we  heard  stories  of  leaders  who  happened  upon  an  entry-­‐level  position  in  the  field,  only  to   realize  they  could  contribute  to  improving  economic,  social,  and  educational  opportunities  for   their  neighbors,  communities,  and  the  nation.  Individuals  whos  family  members  received  help   when  they  needed  it  (or  did  not)  inspired  many  of  the  leaders  to  ensure  opportunities  for  the   next  generation  were  not  just  a  matter  of  luck,  but  there  by  design.     In  fact,  many  of  the  workforce  leaders  we  spoke  to  see  themselves  and  their  organizations  as   community  stewards.  They  are  serious  and  articulate  about  public  service  and  expect  the  same   of  their  peers  and  colleagues,  stressing  passion  and  commitment  as  a  key  qualification.   “Workforce  leadership  requires  a  genuine  understanding  of  issues,  resources,  and  metrics,”   noted  one  participant.  “Honesty  is  crucial,  and  it  helps  if  leadership  has  a  genuine  passion  for   the  issues."           9    
  10. 10.   PostScript   Our  team  of  experienced  interviewers  and  researchers  were  surprised  and  impressed  by  the   power  the  lens  of  "leadership"  brought  to  discussions  of  workforce  development.    This  is  not   the  first  time  we  have  spoken  to  workforce  leaders  about  the  work  they  do.  However,  it  is  the   first  time  we  have  asked  them,  as  leaders  in  the  field,  about  their  priorities.  In  each  instance,   participants—who  ranged  from  locally  elected  officials,  workforce  board  members,  and  policy   experts—put  down  their  scripts  and  spoke  plainly  about  the  issues  that  matter  to  them  and   why.  We  learned  much  from  them  and  hope  to  share  it  widely.       For  more  information,  visit  the  project’s  website  at  www.EnhangingWorkforceLeadership.org,   follow  the  project  on  Twitter  @WFLeadership,  or  email  project  leaders  Kristin  Wolff   (kwolff@thinkers-­‐and-­‐doers.com  or  Vinz  Koller  (vinz_koller@spra.com).           Enhancing  Workforce  Leadership  is  a  Technical  Assistance  Project  of  the  Employment  Training  Administration  of   the  US  Department  of  Labor  operated  under  contract  by  Social  Policy  Research  Associates.    This  project  seeks  to   better  understand  the  nature  of  workforce  leadership  and  document  leaders’  perspective  on  what  can  be  done  to   support  it.    The  views  expressed  are  those  of  the  authors,  Alison  Gash  and  Kristin  Wolff,  and  should  not  be   attributed  to  the  Department  of  Labor.     10    

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