Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Librasvideonew

525 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Librasvideonew

  1. 1. Video Training of Student Workers in an Academic Library An Exploration of the Issues Related to Video Training of Student Workers in an Academic Library <ul><ul><li>A LIBRAS Funded Grant Presentation by Mary Carrington </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Buswell Memorial Library </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wheaton College. </li></ul></ul>
  2. 2. Why Video? New Developments <ul><ul><li>Student Workers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change in student culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technological advances </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Popularity of videos. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Why Video? Theoretical Background Cognitive Psychology (1960’s Piaget, Bruner) Cognitive Learning Theory (1970’s Pavio, Sweller) Multimedia Learning Theory (1990’s Mayer, Clark)
  4. 4. Why Video? Theoretical Background <ul><ul><li>Dual Coding Theory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Visual System responsible for spatial information and images </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Verbal system for processing written and spoken text </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cognitive Load </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Working memory has limited capacity </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Why Video? Theoretical Background <ul><li>People learn better when multimedia messages are designed in ways that are consistent with how the human mind works and with research-based principles. ( Mayer, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Redundancy Principle: Students learn better from animation and narration than from animation, narration, and on-screen text . (Mayer, 2001) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When you explain visuals with words in text, you overload the visual centers of working memory. When you explain visuals with words in audio, you balance your data between the two working memory sub-systems, thereby maximizing the limited capacity of working memory. (Clark, 2007) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Personalization Principle: Students learn better when the words are in conversational style rather than formal style. (Mayer, Clark, 2003) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Why Video?Theoretical Background <ul><li>People learn better when multimedia messages are designed in ways that are consistent with how the human mind works and with research-based principles. ( Mayer, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Animations (including videos) seem to be especially effective for acquiring procedural knowledge ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hoffler and Leutner (2007) in a 76 pair-wise comparisons of dynamic and static visualizations, concluded that animations (including videos) are better for acquiring procedural-motor knowledge </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Research Goals
  8. 8. Digital Video Production Process 1. Planning 2. Scriptwriting 3. Storyboarding 5. Digital Editing 4. Shooting
  9. 9. Software Used
  10. 10. Screenwriting Script
  11. 11. Storyboard Software
  12. 12. Camera Shots Defined(Stroyboard
  13. 13. Camera Shots Close Up Use this Do not Use this
  14. 14. Videos Produced 1. Videos Produced by Student Workers for Student Workers 2. Videos Produced by Training Specialist for Technical Services
  15. 15. Some Initial Results: Student Workers
  16. 16. Videos Produced for Technical Services
  17. 17. Videos Produced for Technical Services
  18. 18. Next Steps: Video Training Evaluation <ul><ul><li>Comparison of Three Different Types of Training </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Book processing videos used with new student workers and explanation/introduction by supervisor. </li></ul><ul><li>One-on-one training in book processing without the video. </li></ul><ul><li>Letting the students use the video without explanation but students can ask questions . </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Methodology Students and supervisor would both answer survey questions. Supervisor Questions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Were there fewer questions about the book processing tasks from the students watching the video compared to students not watching the video? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Was there less time spent in training the student workers who used the book processing video? Student Questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did you use this tutorial to help you in your job more than once? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Did you review this tutorial when you had a question about your work? </li></ul></ul>Next Steps: Video Training Evaluation
  20. 20. Next Steps: Camera Evaluation <ul><li>Specs. </li></ul><ul><li>120 min recording time </li></ul><ul><li>4 GB </li></ul><ul><li>MAC and PC compatible </li></ul><ul><li>Built in Software </li></ul><ul><li>No Flash Card </li></ul><ul><li>Less than $200 </li></ul><ul><li>Great sound and video quality </li></ul>Flip Ultra Camcorders
  21. 21. References <ul><li>Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2003). E-Learning and the Science of Instruction , San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. </li></ul><ul><li>Hoffler, N., & Leutner, D. (2007) Instructional animation versus static pictures: A meta-analysis Learning and Instruction 17, p. 722-738. </li></ul><ul><li>Mayer, R. E. (2001). Multimedia Learning, New York: Cambridge University Press. </li></ul>

×