Martha Rogers’s Science of
Unitary Human Beings
SIMPLIFIED….WITH A CASE SCENARIO INCLUDED
By Karen V. Duhamel, MSN, MS, RN...
Who was Martha Rogers and why is she
important to the science and art of
Nursing?
 Rogers was a highly educated nurse who...
Key Conceptual Terms
 What does Martha mean by “Energy fields”?
 The fundamental unit of both the living and nonliving; ...
Martha’s Definition of Homeodynamics
 The way in which a person’s life process evolves
 Physiological equilibrium (homeo...
Rogers’s Metaparadigm
 Nursing:
 requires specific learning
 considered a profession
 both an empirical science and ar...
Examples of Homeodynamic Elements in Nurse-
Patient Interactions
 A patient in acute pain (= low level of resonancy)
 Me...
Case Scenario
 Bill is hospitalized for unrelenting chest pain and shortness of breath. Bill’s
resonancy level is quite l...
References
 Gueldner, S. H., Michel, Y., Bramlett. M. H., Chinn-Fang, L., Johnston, L. W., Endo,
E., . Carlyle, M. S. (20...
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Martha Rogers’s Science of Unitary Human Beings...simplified...with a case scenario included

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This PowerPoint is a comprehensive overview of Martha Rogers's abstract conceptual model of the Science of Unitary Human Beings, with a simplified description of her model, including a case scenario illustrating key conceptual principles.

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Martha Rogers’s Science of Unitary Human Beings...simplified...with a case scenario included

  1. 1. Martha Rogers’s Science of Unitary Human Beings SIMPLIFIED….WITH A CASE SCENARIO INCLUDED By Karen V. Duhamel, MSN, MS, RN 1
  2. 2. Who was Martha Rogers and why is she important to the science and art of Nursing?  Rogers was a highly educated nurse who earned her doctorate degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1954, wrote 200+ articles, 3 books and founded the Society of Rogerian Scholars (1988)  Developed a Conceptual model of nursing that focused on the impact energy fields and patterns have in nurse, patient and environmental interactions  Rogers saw human beings as pandimensional (without physical or psychological boundaries), resulting in a “unitary whole” with sharing and exchanging of energy occurring within one’s environment 2
  3. 3. Key Conceptual Terms  What does Martha mean by “Energy fields”?  The fundamental unit of both the living and nonliving; infinite, pandimensional, unpredictable – Rogers’s definition of a Unitary Human Being  What does Martha mean by “Patterns”?  Energy fields that represent the person’s Whole existence – they are intangible, non-visible manifestations but perceptually present in all interactions 3
  4. 4. Martha’s Definition of Homeodynamics  The way in which a person’s life process evolves  Physiological equilibrium (homeostasis) of person  Consists of:  Resonancy: continuous movement from lower to higher frequency wave patterns between person and environment; postulated to be associated with a heightened sense of well-being  Helicy: the unpredictable changes between person and environment which foster creativity, innovation and problem-solving  Integrality: continuous interactive rhythms between person and environment  Synchrony: continuous change that happens simultaneously between person and environment  Reciprocy: continuous interaction between human and environment 4
  5. 5. Rogers’s Metaparadigm  Nursing:  requires specific learning  considered a profession  both an empirical science and art  purpose is to promote health and well- being for all persons  exists for the care of people and life process of humans  Person:  an open system continuously connected to the environment  Whole in the truest sense and non- reducible, comprised of patterns and pandimensional energy fields  Health:  passive means without illness (wellness)  relates to a person’s value system and personal cultural interpretation, consisting of both high and low values  “life process” is filled with dynamic and creative unity with one’s environment  Environment:  irreducible, pandimensional sharing of energy and patterns with humans through synchronous interactions 5
  6. 6. Examples of Homeodynamic Elements in Nurse- Patient Interactions  A patient in acute pain (= low level of resonancy)  Medicating a patient in pain (= high level of resonancy; synchrony between person and environment)  Alternative treatment modalities such as Reiki, Imagery, Therapeutic Touch (= helical interventions)  Working collaboratively with the patient (person) to address what he/she considers health, such as a weight loss program (= synchrony, helicy)  The nurse approaches the patient (person) in a calm manner and the patient responds positively (= reciprocy, synchrony) 6
  7. 7. Case Scenario  Bill is hospitalized for unrelenting chest pain and shortness of breath. Bill’s resonancy level is quite low, requiring pain medication, oxygen, and supportive care provided by nursing. Bill is experiencing integrality, synchrony and reciprocy with his environment. Bill undergoes a cardiac catherization, followed by a successful CABG procedure and receives wound care, pain management, disease and medication education by nursing. Bill tells his nurse he values having survived his heart attack and believes he has a chance to start over. He wants to quit smoking and reduce his stress level to become more healthy. The nurse educates Bill on smoking cessation options and stress reduction techniques, such as meditation, and guided imagery. Bill has received helical interventions and continues in a state of integrality with his environment. 7
  8. 8. References  Gueldner, S. H., Michel, Y., Bramlett. M. H., Chinn-Fang, L., Johnston, L. W., Endo, E., . Carlyle, M. S. (2005). The well-being picture scale: A revision of the Index of Field Energy. Nursing Science Quarterly 18(1), 42-50.  Hesook, S.K., & Kollak, I. (2006). Nursing theories: Conceptual & philosophical foundations (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Springer.  Marriner-Tomey, A., & Alligood, M. R. (2002). Nursing theorists and their work (7th ed.). St. Louis, Mo: Mosby.  Sitzman, K., & Eichelberger, L. (2004). Understanding the work of nurse theorists. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett. 8

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