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PtaHlOkTieOs September 2014 Issue 08 
A Joint Initiative of Kunzum and ZEISS 
Haiku in the 
Viewfinder 
ZEISS LOXIA 
For F...
THE WORLD IS FULL OF 
HIDDEN WONDERS 
Have camera, should explore. 
The world is a rich place – but many of its finest cre...
PtaHlOkTieOs A Joint Initiative of Kunzum and ZEISS 
PHOTOTALKIES IS A MONTHLY DIGITAL 
MAGAZINE. AND IT’S FREE!! DOWNLOAD...
SANCHI,VIDISHA & 
GYARASPUR 
Go to Bhopal in Madhya Pradesh, and explore these 
wonders 
How many people will tell you tha...
VISITING SANCHI 
Travel Tips 
* Planning: Sanchi and other attractions close by are best explored if you stay in Bhopal an...
SANCHI & SURROUNDING ATTRACTIONS 
Suggested Itineraries 
When exploring Sanchi and other attractions close by, it is best ...
Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh 
Fact Sheet 
A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Sanchi and its nearby attractions are a must-visit for t...
* Stupa 3: It has a hemispherical dome, with a diameter of 15 metres and a height of 8.23 metres excluding the crowning el...
DATELINE SANCHI 
* 563 B.C.: Prince Siddhartha born to Suddhodana, belonging to the powerful clan of Shakya rulers and kin...
11 Gateway at Stupa 1 in Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
12 The imposing Monastery 51 on the western slope at Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
13 Temple 18 on the southern side of Stupa 1 at Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
14 Temple and Monastery 47 on the eastern side in Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
VIDISHA, MADHYA PRADESH 
Vidisha, earlier known as Besnagar, occupies an important footnote in India’s history, one that i...
VIJAYMANDIR (BIJAMANDAL), VIDISHA 
This religious site is testament to the meeting of different faiths in the trading town...
17 Remains of the temple of Bijamandal in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
18 A baoli (stepwell) in the Bijamandal complex in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
HELIODORUS’ PILLAR, VIDISHA 
Life for this pillar must surely be lonely; it stands in the middle of nowhere, all by itself...
20 Heliodorus’ Pillar in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
UDAIGIRI CAVES, VIDISHA 
Whenever I see manmade cave structures with carvings and sculptures, I can only marvel at the tal...
A 3.6 metre long image of Sheshashayi Vishnu portrayed lying on a coiled primeval 
snake in Cave 13, one of largest of the...
Cave 5 of the Udaigiri caves has an elaborate sculpture of Hindu God Vishnu in his incarnation of Varaha 
or Boar, shown r...
24 Art on the walls of Udaigiri Caves in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
Gyaraspur 
MADHYA PRADESH 
Gyaraspur is a surprise no one will tell you about unless you ask – even then, most will be ign...
Maladevi Temple 
GYARASPUR 
As you approach Gyaraspur, you will be greeted with the sight of the 9th century Maladevi temp...
Bajramath Temple 
GYARASPUR 
The 10th century Bajramath temple is the first structure you will encounter when you enter Gy...
Athkhmaba 
GYARASPUR 
Look near the bus stand of Gyaraspur, and you will find the remains of an eight-pillared structure c...
Hindola Torana 
GYARASPUR 
One look at Hindola Torana, and you cannot help but wonder at its magnificence during 
its glor...
DEEP BLUE VISION INTO THE DEEP BLUE 
Kevin Palmer has been diving with his camera for more than 30 years. He loves 
the oc...
For Kevin Palmer underwater photography is more than a profession; 
it’s a downright passion. “It’s still a peripheral are...
Other people go on photo safaris in places with attractive landscapes. 
But Palmer travels to where the water is clear so ...
For his short photo story about the traditional divers of 
South Indonesia, Palmer uses a mirrorless system camera 
(Sony ...
A hawksbill sea turtle glides over a soft coral reef in southern Indonesia 
“I had a brand-new Touit 2.8/12 and no experie...
The adult broadclub cuttlefish is known for its dramatic 
tentacle displays and rapid color changes. 
The divers of Pulau ...
Taking pictures under water, you are confronted with 
different problems than on land. Many pictures require balancing 
ar...
Planar T* 1,4/85 (f/4, 1/80, ISO 250) 
HAIKU IN 
THE VIEWFINDER 
Natural Beauty 
Kunito Imai is fond of animals and plants...
Kunito Imai lives in the center of Tokyo. 
For a nature photographer, it’s not exactly 
the ideal location to live in. So ...
During the 1980s, Imai‘s father was often in Germany for 
business. On one occasion he brought back a special souve-nir: 
...
“Normally I stop down both Makro-Pla-nar 
lenses to f/5.6. In my opinion, it is 
with this setting that you achieve the be...
Despite the focus on the background, the main motif should also 
not be neglected. Details and colors, those are the thing...
About Kunito Imai 
Kunito Imai lives in Tokyo and works for the local administration. 
He spends his free time photographi...
ZEISS 
LOXIA Setting new standards for 
full-frame mirrorless 
46 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
Loxia 2/50 without lens hood 
With the new Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50 lenses, ZEISS 
combines maximum image quality with cl...
“Ever since the Sony Alpha 7/7R/7S helped compact system 
cameras break through to the full frame, there has been a 
growi...
Loxia 2/50 application sample 
The Loxia lenses offer several key 
highlights, including optimiza-tion 
for digital sensor...
Thanks to the mechanical deactivation of aperture 
click stops progressive aperture settings are possible (de-click) 
“If ...
Loxia 2/35 lens scheme 
Yet photographers are not the only ones who will enjoy the 
Loxia. Ambitious videographers will ha...
Loxia 2/50 lens scheme 
As a Biogon, the optical design of the Loxia 2/35 consists of nine 
lens elements in six groups. W...
Loxia 2/35 application sample 
The design of the Loxia 2/50, which is based on the famous Planar, 
has six lens elements i...
Loxia lenses have ten aperture blades and the aperture is almost 
circular. The effective isolation of motifs with a low d...
The lenses offer a high resolution across the entire image field 
and — especially at the maximal aperture opening of f/2 ...
PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS 
Connect with ZEISS 
https://www.facebook.com/carlzeisslenses 
http://www.flickr.com/grou...
ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 
Newest Otus Family 
Member from ZEISS 
ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 expands lens family with another focal length ...
The ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 displays all of its advantages in the classic short telephoto range, i.e. portraits and people. Its ...
 
 
About 
Ajay Jain 
Ajay Jain is a full time 
writer and photographer, 
and has authored eight 
paperback books and ov...
T-49, GF, Hauz Khas Village 
New Delhi 110016, India 
Tel: +91.9650 702 777 / +91.11.2651 3949 
mail@kunzum.com 
Timings: ...
PhotoTalkies Magazine - September 2014
PhotoTalkies Magazine - September 2014
PhotoTalkies Magazine - September 2014
PhotoTalkies Magazine - September 2014
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PhotoTalkies Magazine - September 2014

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PhotoTalkies a monthly e-magazine and is all about celebrating photography, and telling stories through images. In a joint venture between ZEISS and Kunzum. Enjoy the September 2014 edition of the same. And keep coming back for more.

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PhotoTalkies Magazine - September 2014

  1. 1. PtaHlOkTieOs September 2014 Issue 08 A Joint Initiative of Kunzum and ZEISS Haiku in the Viewfinder ZEISS LOXIA For Full Frame Mirrorless AMAZING ARCHITECTURAL WONDERS AROUND BHOPAL SANCHI, VIDISHA & GYARASPUR Deep Blue Vision UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY MARVELS
  2. 2. THE WORLD IS FULL OF HIDDEN WONDERS Have camera, should explore. The world is a rich place – but many of its finest creations lie in relative obscurity, waiting to be discovered by those who go out to seek. Such is the case with the wonders around Bhopal, capital of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. Many would have heard of Sanchi, home to some of the finest Buddhist stupas and temples, and a UNSECO World Heritage Site – but few would have actually gone there. And this is just the beginning. Drive on, and you will come across temples and other structures going back centuries. These include cave temples in Vidisha and the ruins of Gyaraspur – the latter remind-ing one of pillars and gateways usually associated with Roman style of grandeur. Then there is the impressive Shiva temple at Bhojpur – and painting in the cave shelters in Bhimbetka going tens of thousands of years. When you are done with all this, connect with nature in Satpura National Park – one of the finest reserves in the country. Answer honestly: How many of the above have you heard about and visited yourself? Chances are most of you may not have seen these – or even known others who have. All it needs is a little exploring, and the willingness to head out. What are you waiting for? Go ahead, explore. And shoot. With a ZEISS. It has been the month of good news from Photokina in Germany. ZEISS has launched lenses to salivate over – read about them in this issue. And also pick tips on ‘Haiku’ photography and on shooting underwater. Let’s click together. AJAY JAIN ajay@ajayjain.com
  3. 3. PtaHlOkTieOs A Joint Initiative of Kunzum and ZEISS PHOTOTALKIES IS A MONTHLY DIGITAL MAGAZINE. AND IT’S FREE!! DOWNLOAD AND READ ON YOUR IPAD, IPHONE OR ANY OTHER TABLET, COMPUTER AND SMARTPHONE. www.kunzum.com/phototalkies mail@kunzum.com Want to contribute to PhotoTalkies? Ping us at mail@kunzum.com Disclaimer: All articles and photographs in this magazine are the opinions of the respective contributors. It is understood that they own the copyright to the same, or have the rights to offer the same under their bylines. ZEISS is not responsible for the authenticity of any of the articles and photographs, nor will be held liable for any disputes, claims and liabilities arising out of ownership or copyright issues of the content in the magazine. CONTENTS SANCHI, VIDISHA & GYARASPUR Amazing Architectural Wonders Around Bhopal 05 DEEP BLUE VISION Underwater Photography Marvels 31 Haiku in the Viewfinder 39 ZEISS LOXIA: For Full Frame Mirrorless 46 ZEISS Otus 1.4 / 85 Newest member of the family 57
  4. 4. SANCHI,VIDISHA & GYARASPUR Go to Bhopal in Madhya Pradesh, and explore these wonders How many people will tell you that Bhopal is an extraordinary hub for travellers? Unfortunately, the image of the city is too closely tied to images of the gas tragedy on the night of December 2-3, 1984 killing thousands. However, drive into the city, and you will be greeted by a landscape marked by lakes, hills and greenery. It will be tough to imagine it being the site of a gruesome event. There is no need to correlate the two. The city is beautiful, and its surroundings rich. You have famous and not-so-famous structures close to the city including the stupas at Sanchi, the cave temples of Vidisha, ruins in Gyaraspur, an architec-tural marvel at Bhojpur and prehistoric rock art in Bhimbetka. And more. Drive further and you will be in Satpura National Park, one of the best wildlife reserves in the world. Each of these are a wonder in themselves and few will tell you about it. Bhopal seems to be a well kept secret within the travel community. It need not be. The city is well connected by rail, road and air with the rest of the country. It offers a mix of history, food, nature and wildlife – and all this within a few hours of each another. What more can a traveller ask for? Next time you are considering a break, think Bhopal. And be prepared to be surprised. Really surprised. AJAY JAIN 05 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  5. 5. VISITING SANCHI Travel Tips * Planning: Sanchi and other attractions close by are best explored if you stay in Bhopal and plan day visits. * Best time to go: You would want to visit central India only during the cooler months. A good time to explore the region around Sanchi is between November to February. December and January can get very cold at nights. Mornings and evenings can be pleasant in October and March too, but days can get very warm. At all other times of the year, expect temperatures in excess of 40 degrees Celsius (104 F) except when it is raining. * Accommodation: You have a choice from budget to high quality hotels in nearby Bhopal. Sanchi has a few average quality hotels run by Madhya Pradesh Tourism and private operators. There are no options at other places covered in this book. It is advisable to book in advance. * How to reach: Bhopal is well connected by road, rail and air with the rest of the country. Sanchi and other attractions are a short drive away. * Local transport: You can book tourist taxis in Bhopal to ferry you around. * Who is it for? People of all ages. Those suffering from any orthopedic ailments or the aged may face difficulties in negotiating the approach and terrain at some historical sites. * Protect yourself from the sun: The sun can be quite harsh in these parts, including during the winters. Carry hats and sunshades; it is advisable to cover your arms and legs. * Carry food and water: When exploring places outside Bhopal covered in this book, you might not get food to your liking; even reliable drinking water will be hard to come by. Sanchi will offer decent meals though. It is advisable that you carry snacks and water if intending to be out for longer than a few hours. * Distances: Bhopal to Sanchi – 53 kms (33 miles); Sanchi to Vidisha – 7 kms (4 miles); Vidisha to Gyaraspur – 41 kms (26 miles) 06 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  6. 6. SANCHI & SURROUNDING ATTRACTIONS Suggested Itineraries When exploring Sanchi and other attractions close by, it is best to make Bhopal your base. The region has a lot to offer for travellers – and you can spend as many days here as you prefer. Here is a suggested itinerary for the same: DAY 1 Spend in Bhopal, visiting its lakes and drive through zoo. DAYS 2-3 Visit Sanchi, Vidisha and Gyaraspur. These are all on the same axis. You can also cover them all in one day but suggested you spend longer. If you are comfortable with checking into a Madhya Pradesh Tourism run hotel, you can spend a night at one in Sanchi making it a hub for all these three locations. DAY 4 Visit Bhojpur and Bhimbetka. You can return to Bhopal after covering these or drive on further to Satpura National Park. DAYS 5-7 Explore Satpura National Park, one of the most beautiful reserves in India. The forest is Nature at its best: thick forests, water bodies, stunning landscapes, animals, birds and plant life. KUNZUM ROUTE K17 For directions to each of the places mentioned here, refer to Kunzum Route K17 for time / distance charts and maps between various points. It will also help you plan your itineraries better.
  7. 7. Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh Fact Sheet A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Sanchi and its nearby attractions are a must-visit for travellers to central India. It is the site of some of the finest built and preserved Buddhist stupas in India. Sanchi draws us all to itself not only for its archi-tectural and design finesse, but the site itself is very serene and calming for the soul. Located on a hill near Bhopal, cap-ital of the state of Madhya Pradesh, one cannot help wonder how Buddhists in the times gone by always managed to build structures that would continue to impress for centuries to come. * Location: In the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, a short drive from state capital Bhopal. Sanchi is located on a hill, aptly chosen for the serenity and seclusion it offered; at the same time, it was close to the then thriving city of Vidisha. Located close to the confluence of two rivers, the Betwa and the Bes, Vidisha was located on an important trading route. The rich merchants provided the funds for the development and up-keep of Sanchi, and thus it continued to flourish long after the royal patronage was over. * Other names: Sanchi has been known by other names too over time including Kakanaya or Kakanava, Kakanadabota and Bota-Sri-Parvata. * General layout: The monuments of Sanchi can broadly be divided into two groups: one comprising those located on a hilltop, and the others the western slope of the hill. The plateau on top of the hill is oblong shaped, measuring 384 metres from north to south, and 201 metres from east to west. The majority of monuments numbered 1 – 50 lie within a stone circuit wall built in the 11th – 12th centuries A.D. * Stupa 1: Known as the Great Stupa built by Ashoka, it consists of an almost hemispherical dome truncated near the top and crowned by a tri-ple umbrella (Chhatravali), and set at the centre of a heavy masonry pedestal within a square railing. The diameter of the stupa is 36.60 metres and its height is 16.46 metres (excluding the railing and umbrella). The stupa has undergone many additions and repairs over time. The stupa has four elaborately sculptured gateways, the earliest being on the southern side. These gateways are about 8.53 metres high, excluding the crowning elements. The subject matter of the carvings include: Scenes from the Jatakas; Scenes from Buddha’s life; Events in the subsequent history of Buddhism; Scenes related to the Manushi-Buddhas; Miscellaneous scenes and decorations.
  8. 8. * Stupa 3: It has a hemispherical dome, with a diameter of 15 metres and a height of 8.23 metres excluding the crowning elements. It was modelled after Stupa 1, but is smaller with only one gateway. It is marked by a single umbrella at the top, and was built in the 2nd Century B.C. The gateway is slightly over five metres high but its workmanship is markedly inferior to those of Stupa 1. The stupa is important because it housed the relics of Sariputra and Maudgalyayana, two foremost disciples of the Buddha. * Other Stupas: Many other stupas have been found at Sanchi, but only partial remains survive. * Pillars: The site boasted many impressive pillars at one time, but none survive in their original form. The earliest, Pillar 10 erected by Ashoka near the south gateway of Stupa 1, only has its lower part standing; fragments are placed under a shed close by and its capital exhibited in a museum at Sanchi. * Temples: Remains of many temples can still be seen in Sanchi. The most prominent is the seventh century Temple 18 facing the south gateway of Stupa 1. * The eastern area: You get to a terraced area if you go up steps opposite the eastern gate of Stupa 1. This comprises Monasteries 46 and 47, and the remains of many other temples and buildings. * The southern area: You will find the remains of more temples and monasteries, built over a period spanning over a thousand years. * The Western Slope: A modern flight of steps leads you to the imposing Monastery 51, built on a ledge of rock, about seven metres lower than the main terrace. It is 32.22 metres long along the north-south axis and measures 32.69 metres from east to west. Further down, about 320 metres down the slope, stands Stupa 2. Its size is roughly the same as Stupa 3 but it looks bare with the absence of gateways, crowning members, stairway balustrades and other decorative elements. * Archaeological Museum: If you want to see some of the artefacts and excavations, you can visit the museum located close to the entrance of the Sanchi complex. 09 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  9. 9. DATELINE SANCHI * 563 B.C.: Prince Siddhartha born to Suddhodana, belonging to the powerful clan of Shakya rulers and king of Kapilavastu, and his queen Maya. The prince would later renounce the world and come to be known as the Buddha. * 3rd Century B.C. – 12th Century A.D.: The extended time period over which the structures at Sanchi were built. The initial foundation for a stupa and a monolithic pillar were laid by Emperor Ashoka who ruled from 273 – 231 B.C. Ashoka was largely responsible for the spread of Buddhism not only within his kingdom, but to other faraway lands including Sri Lanka, Syria, Egypt and Macedonia. * Mid 2nd Century B.C.: A renewed surge of building activity during the reign of the Sungas. This included the stone encasing and enlargement of the stupa of Ashoka, the reconstruction of Temple 40, and the building of Stupas 2 and 3. * 1st Century B.C.: Elaborately carved gateways were added to Stupas 1 and 3 during the rule of the Satavahanas. * 4th Century A.D.: After a lull due to political upheavals, Sanchi prospered again during the reign of the Guptas; their extended stable reign provided the peace and prosperity for the growth of artistic pursuits. * 7th – 8th Centuries A.D.: Another wave of development at Sanchi after Harshavardhana brought a sense of unity and peace in northern India during his rule fro, 606 – 647 A.D. Sanchi was unaffected following the jostling for power amongst various dynasties after Harshavardhana’s death. * 14th Century A.D. onwards: Sanchi lay deserted and unnoticed, and historians have been unable to establish the reasons for this neglect. * 1818 A.D.: British General Taylor discovered the ruins of Sanchi, and found Stupas 1, 2 and 3 intact. This generated a lot of interest in the site, but also resulted in extensive damage at the hands of amateur archaeologists and treasure seekers. * 1822 A.D.: Captain Johnson, Assistant Political Agent in Bhopal, opened up Stupa 1 from top to bottom on one side, leaving a great breach. This resulted in the collapse of the Western Gateway and a part of the enclosing balustrade. Stupa 2 was also damaged extensively. * 1851 A.D.: Alexander Cunningham and Captain F.G. Maisey excavated Stupas 2 and 3 and found relic-caskets within. All this caused extensive damage to the structures. A local zamindar (landlord) is believed to have broken the Ashoka Pillar into pieces to make a sugarcane press. * 1881 A.D.: Major Cole took upon the task of repairing and preserving the site. Restoration work included clearing the vegetation, filling of the breach in the dome of Stupa 1, putting together the fallen West and South Gateways and a part of the railing, and the gateway in front of Stupa 3. No effort was made on the other monuments though. * 1912 – 1919 A.D.: Sir John Marshall, Director General of Archaeology in India, restored the monuments to their present condition. This included the complete dismantling and rebuilding of the south-west quadrant of Stupa 1; setting up of its balustrades and erection of the crowning members; reconstruction of the dome, balustrade and crowning members of Stupa 3; repairing of Temple 18, 45, 17, 31 and 32; clearing of jungles and planting of trees and flowering creepers. * 1936 A.D.: Mohammad Hamid excavated the ruins of the hill slope between Stupas 1 and 3, and discovered the well-preserved shell of a monastery.
  10. 10. 11 Gateway at Stupa 1 in Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  11. 11. 12 The imposing Monastery 51 on the western slope at Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  12. 12. 13 Temple 18 on the southern side of Stupa 1 at Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  13. 13. 14 Temple and Monastery 47 on the eastern side in Sanchi PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  14. 14. VIDISHA, MADHYA PRADESH Vidisha, earlier known as Besnagar, occupies an important footnote in India’s history, one that is largely ignored. It was a thriving trade centre, lying on the banks of the Betwa and Bes rivers. Its rich merchants funded most of the structures at Sanchi and the surrounding areas. It was also home to Devi, a rich merchant’s daughter, who attracted the attention of Prince Ashoka when he stopped on the way to Ujjain. He married her, but Devi chose to stay on in her home town. It was Ashoka who later, as emperor, built the great Stupa 1 at Sanchi in his mission to spread the message of Buddhism. And this further prompted building activity in the region for centuries to come. Drive around, and you will find many historical attractions in Vidisha – but you may have to ask around to get to these.
  15. 15. VIJAYMANDIR (BIJAMANDAL), VIDISHA This religious site is testament to the meeting of different faiths in the trading town of Vidisha. Bijamandal is a 11th century structure that may have been a Hindu temple earlier before being converted into a mosque in 1682. Excavations revealed several inscriptions to suggest the temple may have been dedicated to the Sun God, known as Bhaillasvamin in this region, and to the Goddess Charchika. There may have been many other shrines dedicated to various deities, main one being the Hindu God Shiva. The temple stands on a grand platform, approached by a flight of steps. It boasted of spectacular dimensions, having been built over a span of 300 years. Excavations from the site have been arranged in the well manicured gardens for display. A baoli (stepwell), dated around 8th century A.D., precedes the main temple and has a pillar decorated with scenes from the life of the Hindu God Krishna. 16 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  16. 16. 17 Remains of the temple of Bijamandal in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  17. 17. 18 A baoli (stepwell) in the Bijamandal complex in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  18. 18. HELIODORUS’ PILLAR, VIDISHA Life for this pillar must surely be lonely; it stands in the middle of nowhere, all by itself, attracting attention on certain festive days when a baba (holy man) uses the site for exorcism ceremonies. This belief has earned it the title of Khamba Baba (Khamba meaning pillar), revered by locals. The pillar, dating back to 150 B.C. with a length of 20 feet and 7 inches (according to a descriptive board), is believed to have been built by a Greek named Heliodorus, who had adopted Hinduism himself. According to a Brahmi script inscription on the pillar, he was the ambassador of the Greek King of Takshashila (modern Taxila in Pakistan) assigned to the court of King Bhagabhadra of Vidisha. The pillar is dedicated to Vasudeva (Lord Vishnu); it depicts an image of Garuda, the large mythical bird serving as the carrier to Hindu God Vishnu. A Vishnu temple stood near the site of this pillar in the 4th century B.C. 19 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  19. 19. 20 Heliodorus’ Pillar in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  20. 20. UDAIGIRI CAVES, VIDISHA Whenever I see manmade cave structures with carvings and sculptures, I can only marvel at the talent and patience of its creators. The Udaigiri caves may not be as grand as those of Ajanta and Ellora, but they are impressive nonetheless. A group of 20 caves – 18 Hindu and the others Jain – were carved into the sandstone hillsides around the 4th-5th centuries A.D. An inscription in Cave 6 suggest that the caves were excavated during the reign of the Gupta king, Chandragupta II who ruled from 382 – 401 A.D. The caves are an intricate work of art, with beautifully chiselled entrances, architraves and pillars. Some caves have richly carved doorways guarded by figures of dwarapalas and other mythical figures. Wear comfortable shoes when you visit the caves – you may want to explore the hillside as these are spread all across. 21 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  21. 21. A 3.6 metre long image of Sheshashayi Vishnu portrayed lying on a coiled primeval snake in Cave 13, one of largest of the Udaigiri Caves in Vidisha 22 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  22. 22. Cave 5 of the Udaigiri caves has an elaborate sculpture of Hindu God Vishnu in his incarnation of Varaha or Boar, shown raising the Earth Goddess Prithvi from the primal waters. Measuring nearly 7 metres by 14 metres, the walls on either side of Varaha are covered with rows of rishis (holy men). The lower part of the ground is decorated with wavy lines to depict water. These waves are shown to break out into two to depict the great rivers of Ganga and Yamuna. 23 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  23. 23. 24 Art on the walls of Udaigiri Caves in Vidisha PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  24. 24. Gyaraspur MADHYA PRADESH Gyaraspur is a surprise no one will tell you about unless you ask – even then, most will be ignorant of the existence of architectural marvels here. Located 48 kms (30 miles) northeast of Sanchi, you will find structures with architectural designs rarely seen in India. If the Archaeological Survey of India was not maintaining these, they would have withered away, neglected and vandalized. Drive or walk around and enjoy the sights. 25 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  25. 25. Maladevi Temple GYARASPUR As you approach Gyaraspur, you will be greeted with the sight of the 9th century Maladevi temple from afar. Perched on the edge of a hill, the temple paints a striking image. It is partly cut into the rock, and partly built. Originally a Hindu temple, the Jain community took over later and placed their own idols here. The temple is dedicated to Adhinatha, a Jain Tirthankara. The building is a true piece of art, with intricate carvings and sculptures depicting Pur-na Ghatas (overflowing pots), Kirtimukhas (demon faces), Yakshas and Yakshinis (Nature Spirits, usually benevolent, who are caretakers of natu-ral treasures hidden in the earth and tree roots). Approached by a short drive or hike uphill, the temple has a very serene setting – allowing you to sit on the rocks overlooking green fields, soaking in the solitude. 26 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  26. 26. Bajramath Temple GYARASPUR The 10th century Bajramath temple is the first structure you will encounter when you enter Gyaraspur. Elaborately built, it has three Garbhagrihas (inner sanctums) with sculptures of Jain Tirthankaras. Originally these were dedicated to the Hindu Gods Vishnu, Shiva and Surya (Sun God). The doors, gates and walls at the back depict images of Hindu Gods Vishnu, Shiva, Brahma and Surya (Sun God). Like the Maladevi temple, this too was a Hindu temple converted to a Jain one later. 27 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  27. 27. Athkhmaba GYARASPUR Look near the bus stand of Gyaraspur, and you will find the remains of an eight-pillared structure called Athkhamba (Ath means eight, and Khamba means pillar), standing on a high plinth. Originally a Shiva temple, it dates back to the 9th century A.D. The pillars are intricately carved – and you can also see couples in intimate positions sculpted into the top of the four central pillars. 28 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  28. 28. Hindola Torana GYARASPUR One look at Hindola Torana, and you cannot help but wonder at its magnificence during its glory days. Located at the base of the hill leading to the Maladevi temple, what stands now are the ruins of a 10th century Vishnu temple. The exquisite pillars of the mandapa (hall for public rituals) and the torana (gateway) still survive. The latter are noteworthy for the detailed depictions of the 10 incarnations of Hindu God Vishnu. 29 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  29. 29. DEEP BLUE VISION INTO THE DEEP BLUE Kevin Palmer has been diving with his camera for more than 30 years. He loves the oceans’ blue vastness and fascinating animal kingdom, every bit as much as he loves the people whose lives are so closely intertwined with the sea. His motifs are as diverse as the oceans are deep. 31 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  30. 30. For Kevin Palmer underwater photography is more than a profession; it’s a downright passion. “It’s still a peripheral area of photography, but the community is growing. And that’s a great development because it means more and more people can have the pleasure of being exposed to this fascinating genre. I also work for one of the world’s largest sell-ers of underwater photo equipment. Just recently we had a workshop on the Philippines with 34 participants from around the world. For one week, they focused on nothing else but underwater photography. It was a dream.” Free diver, Pura Island (Pulau Pura), Indonesia 32 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  31. 31. Other people go on photo safaris in places with attractive landscapes. But Palmer travels to where the water is clear so the beauty of the underwater world can reveal itself to its fullest – for example Indonesia. “In the south of the country there are islands that are very different to the developed areas around Bali. Here you’ll still find tradi-tional societies intact that organize their lives entirely according to the ocean, for example on Pura Island (Pulau Pura) near the larger island of Alor. More or less from the age of two, the locals paddle around in canoes they have made themselves and dive – sometimes with diving goggles carved of wood. A wonderful motif.” Free diver, Pura Island (Pulau Pura), Indonesia 33 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  32. 32. For his short photo story about the traditional divers of South Indonesia, Palmer uses a mirrorless system camera (Sony NEX-6) and the ZEISS Touit 2.8/12 in an underwater housing with a dome port and a semi-spherical ancillary lens. Free diver, Pura Island (Pulau Pura), Indonesia 34 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  33. 33. A hawksbill sea turtle glides over a soft coral reef in southern Indonesia “I had a brand-new Touit 2.8/12 and no experience with it yet. In that sense, the pictures from Indonesia were technically like taking a dive in cold water — even though the ocean there is, luckily, perfectly warm. Concerning the optics, I was equally surprised and enthusiastic: the Touit 2.8/12 demonstrated a very high performance under water. It delivered really sharp images with a balanced, rich color rendering which I really like.” As a result, Palmer was able to take underwater shots of a very different category – pictures where the main subject is not the fish, corals or plants, but rather traditional ways of life that still endure in the 21st century. The children — especially the boys — learn to free dive initially in a playful way, but still as a game with a clear objective: catching fish. To do this, two people in the boat hold the net while two others dive under and drag the net toward a potential catch. “They can hold their breath for at least a minute and dive five to eight meters down. When we photographed them, they had lots of fun showing us their underwater tricks.” 35 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  34. 34. The adult broadclub cuttlefish is known for its dramatic tentacle displays and rapid color changes. The divers of Pulau Pura were a welcome diversion for Palmer, whose focus is normally on the ocean’s animal and plant life as well. During his two-week boat tour through the pristine nature of southern Indonesia, numerous motifs presented themselves. “The most interesting pictures can be taken at a depth of up to 65 feet (20 meters), where sufficient sunlight still penetrates to use for the image. Like this picture of the sea turtle: in shallow water you can play with the sun rays shining through to create interesting effects.” 36 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  35. 35. Taking pictures under water, you are confronted with different problems than on land. Many pictures require balancing artificial and ambient light. But photographing under water without a flash is also a challenge, because a camera’s automatic exposure has been optimized for very different conditions. In the deep blue you need to think differently about how to create images. << The shallow hard coral reefs of the Indo-Pacific provide the habitat for a panoply of tropical fish. But if you know the challenges underwater photography presents, and have the right tools at your disposal, like Kevin Palmer, you can simply dive down and get on with it. “With the Touit 2.8/12 I already achieved fantastic pictures the first time around. An important reason for this was the superb sharpness and high contrast, the latter being one of the big challenges under water, where motifs quickly lose their contours. There’s also the high-quality color rendering: due to the refraction in the water, the proportion of saturated colors in the light decreases, so the image can quickly get a bluish or grayish cast. But with the Touit 2.8/12, the colors look attractive and warm. I’m really looking forward to the Touit 2.8/50M and hope I can try it out soon.” About Kevin Palmer Kevin Palmer has been diving and taking photographs since 1973. For the last 20 years he has worked as a freelance journalist and photographer, special-izing in seascapes. His images and texts appear regularly in well-known diving, travel and water sports magazines. Kevin lives in West Palm Beach, Florida. He is the chief equipment specialist at Reef Photo & Video located in Fort Lauderdale. His photo expeditions and workshops regularly take him to the most beautiful corners of the planet’s oceans. http://www.islandexposure.us/index.html www.reefphoto.com 37 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  36. 36. Planar T* 1,4/85 (f/4, 1/80, ISO 250) HAIKU IN THE VIEWFINDER Natural Beauty Kunito Imai is fond of animals and plants. In and around Tokyo he regularly searches out a small area of nature that he can capture in pictures using ZEISS lenses. His motifs reflect the changing light of the seasons. Portraits of primates, still lifes of flower petals, alluring macro photos — for Imai it is the haiku, the Japanese short poetry form, that forms the common element. 39 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  37. 37. Kunito Imai lives in the center of Tokyo. For a nature photographer, it’s not exactly the ideal location to live in. So when he’s not away traveling, Imai wakes up early and drives in the morning sunlight to his favorite green areas in and around the Japanese capital. “I know exactly which plants and animals I can find where. Depending on the season, I go to a different place and select the appropri-ate motifs. When I get there, I like to work spontaneously. It’s a bit like compos-ing a haiku poem, in which I capture the natural changes during the year and boil it down to just three syllables. This picture of the macaque, for example, was taken in February at the hot springs of Jigokudani, Nagano, the world’s only ‘wellness area’ for wild monkeys. I really like the animal‘s facial expression. And with the ZEISS lens I was able to capture every detail of its fur, including the drops of condensed water in his coat.” Japanese macaque in the hot springs of Jigokudani, Nagano, Japan 40 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  38. 38. During the 1980s, Imai‘s father was often in Germany for business. On one occasion he brought back a special souve-nir: a set of ZEISS binoculars. At the time, Kunito Imai didn’t know what was so special about them, but the name ZEISS had already made a stamp in his mind. When he took up photography in his youth and dreamed of becoming a nature photographer, at first he used the lenses of other manufactur-ers. It was only later that ZEISS re-entered his life: last year, after a long break, he began to photograph again, devoting himself to nature and purchasing a Makro-Planar T* 2/50. He was so enthusiastic about his experiences photographing nature and using this lens that he added the Makro-Planar T* 2/100 to his portfolio. Imai also owns the Distagon T* 2/35. “I never regretted for a moment the decision to devote myself to nature and photography again. I constantly find motifs that have a special effect on me, such as this one of a leaf. It was the middle of winter, a rather boring time of year for nature photographers. I was up early and the sun was rising. Without too much thought, I took a picture of this ‘dying leaf’. It was only when I looked at the photo on the display that I was surprised: I had not expected such an appealing bokeh.” The word ‘bokeh’ comes from the Japanese word for ‘not sharp’ or ‘blurred’ — just one more reason for Imai to pay special attention to this stylistic element. Especially in macro photography, with its small depth of field, the out-of-focus areas in the background play an important role. And it is for that reason that Imai values the special look ZEISS lenses create. Field poppy, Tokyo, Japan A leaf in December’s winter light, Tokyo, Japan 41 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  39. 39. “Normally I stop down both Makro-Pla-nar lenses to f/5.6. In my opinion, it is with this setting that you achieve the best compromise between bokeh and sharpness. The small praying mantis, for example, has a very unconventional effect in front of the intense green-yellow bokeh of the meadow of flowers in the background. Sometimes I increase the aperture to f/2, but you can’t always be that daring.” Young praying mantis atop a flower, Saitama, Japan 42 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  40. 40. Despite the focus on the background, the main motif should also not be neglected. Details and colors, those are the things that really matter to Kunito Imai: “I really enjoy taking pictures of the colors in nature with a ZEISS lens. They are vivid, even downright sensual. The imaging performance is particularly evident with backlight. On top of that, I like the outstanding sharpness of ZEISS lenses. When I took this picture of the rare Forest green tree frog, it was already dusk. But with the Makro-Planar T* 2/50, I was still able to get a good shot. The receding daylight, combined with all the details you can see in the frog’s eyes, is just wonderful. Another example: the morning glo-ry was not directly illuminated by the sun, yet it still seems to glow with light. I was fascinated by the colors and richness of detail. All of a sudden, a bee flew into the flower blossom; every single grain of pollen can be clearly distinguished. Finally, I just want to say that both Makro-Planar lenses have become absolutely indispensable for me as a nature photographer.” Purple morning glory, bee, Tokyo, Japan 43 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  41. 41. About Kunito Imai Kunito Imai lives in Tokyo and works for the local administration. He spends his free time photographing nature with passion. Even in the middle of the metropolis, he constantly searches for a bit of nature that can provide sufficient motifs for him to unleash his creativity. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Its-only-natural/1407474839482710 Forest green tree frog (Rhacophorus arboreus), Tokyo, Japan 44 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  42. 42. ZEISS LOXIA Setting new standards for full-frame mirrorless 46 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  43. 43. Loxia 2/50 without lens hood With the new Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50 lenses, ZEISS combines maximum image quality with classic ease of use for E-mount full-frame cameras. During photokina, which will take place in Cologne from September 16 to 21, photography enthusiasts can see and try out this new family of lenses for the first time. 47 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  44. 44. “Ever since the Sony Alpha 7/7R/7S helped compact system cameras break through to the full frame, there has been a growing desire for a ‘digital manual focus‘ experience that combines the best of both worlds. With the Loxia 2/35 and Loxia 2/50, which are the first members of a new family of manual focus lenses for the E-mount full frame, ZEISS is ready to exceed those expectations,” said Christophe Casenave, Product Manager with ZEISS Camera Lenses. The Loxia 2/35 on the Sony Alpha 7R 48 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  45. 45. Loxia 2/50 application sample The Loxia lenses offer several key highlights, including optimiza-tion for digital sensors and elec-tronic viewfinders, the mechanical aperture setting and – for ambitious videography – the mechanical deac-tivation of the aperture click stops (de-click). The Loxia family has been special-ly optimized for digital sensors and the functions of mirrorless E-mount full-format cameras. An electronic interface transmits lens data (EXIF), but also recognizes focus move-ments and, if desired, activates the camera’s magnifier function. More-over, the Loxia lenses enable precise manual focusing and a mechanical setting of the aperture (working-ap-erture aperture priority). This tradi-tional way of working can express one’s personal photo lifestyle, and open up surprising new creative possibilities to compose the im-age that go beyond all automation. 49 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  46. 46. Thanks to the mechanical deactivation of aperture click stops progressive aperture settings are possible (de-click) “If I had to describe Loxia lenses in just one sentence,” according to Christophe Casenave, “I would say, ‘tradition meets modernity’. These lenses have been designed for photographers who enjoy shooting spon-taneous scenes, but without giving away the work of composing the image to the camera.” 50 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  47. 47. Loxia 2/35 lens scheme Yet photographers are not the only ones who will enjoy the Loxia. Ambitious videographers will have at their disposal the possibility of progressive aperture settings (de-click). This will put a tool with enormous creative potential into their hands thanks to the mechanical deactivation of aperture click stops. The lenses’ precise manual focusing also makes the Loxia suitable for profes-sional video productions. The Loxia lenses are optimized for digital full-frame sensors, and factor the approx. 2.5 mm thick low-pass and infrared filters in, situated in front of the sensor of the corresponding Sony cameras. 51 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  48. 48. Loxia 2/50 lens scheme As a Biogon, the optical design of the Loxia 2/35 consists of nine lens elements in six groups. With a full-frame focal length of a moderate wide angle, this lens is a specialist for nature, landscape and architectural photography. Because it has a low minimum object distance of just 0.3 meters, all the advantages of close-ups with an unusual perspective also come to the fore. 52 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  49. 49. Loxia 2/35 application sample The design of the Loxia 2/50, which is based on the famous Planar, has six lens elements in four groups. As a ‘classic’ normal lens, it has a field of view that corresponds to natural eyesight. The Loxia 2/50 therefore reveals all its strengths in many different situations, from travel and family photography to photojournalism and portraiture. And with a minimum working distance of 0.37 meters, it can also be used for close-ups. The Loxia 2/50 is an uncomplicated but at the same time high-quality standard lens that photographers can keep on their camera continuously; this enables them to react flex-ibly to a wide range of everyday situations. 53 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  50. 50. Loxia lenses have ten aperture blades and the aperture is almost circular. The effective isolation of motifs with a low depth of field as well as free-handed photography, even in poor lighting conditions, are just two examples of the many possibilities that both Loxia lenses offer thanks to their high speed of f/2. The Loxia lenses were intentionally designed to be manual-focus lenses; this makes them extremely compact and therefore a perfect companion for travel and street photography. An important advantage in this respect, especially for photographers who work in these disciplines, is that they cannot be recognized right away as professionals. Using the Loxia lenses, they can capture completely true-to-life situations, without attracting attention. The Loxia 2/35 in detail: weather sealing, e-mount, lens interface 54 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  51. 51. The lenses offer a high resolution across the entire image field and — especially at the maximal aperture opening of f/2 — a harmonious bokeh in the background. The superb mechani-cal quality that ZEISS lenses are known for can also be found in the Loxia family. The smooth focus operation, with a large focus rotation angle of approximately 180 degrees, allows for the finest variations in focusing. The filter diameter is a consistent M52 across the entire lens family. The robust barrel, made entirely of met-al, can withstand the rough everyday situations that professional photographers work in and ensures a long product life. In addition, the lenses have a special weather sealing at the lens mount to prevent spray water from getting between the camera and the lens. Loxia 2/35 without lens hood More application samples can be found on Flickr: Loxia 2/35 Loxia 2/50 Loxia 2/50 as well as Loxia 2/35 come with lens shade, user manual, test certificate, lens caps and de-click tool. The Loxia 2/50 will be available worldwide starting October 2014 and the Loxia 2/35 from the end of the fourth quarter of 2014. The recommended retail price of the Loxia 2/35 will be EUR 965.55* (US$ 1,299.00)* (excl. VAT) and that of the Loxia 2/50 will be EUR 713.45* (US$ 949.00)* (excl. VAT). * Status September 2, 2014 55 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  52. 52. PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS Connect with ZEISS https://www.facebook.com/carlzeisslenses http://www.flickr.com/groups/carlzeisslenses http://vimeo.com/groups/carlzeisslenses https://twitter.com/carlzeisslenses For more information on ZEISS Sports Optics and Camera Lenses www.zeiss.com/sportsoptics www.zeiss.com/photo www.zeiss.com/cine For Customer Enquiries sportsoptics-photo@zeiss.com +91.11.45156000
  53. 53. ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 Newest Otus Family Member from ZEISS ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 expands lens family with another focal length for the highest level of professional image quality Given its focal length and speed, at first glance the new ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 appears to be a traditional portrait lens. But a closer look reveals that this is a fast all-rounder for photographers who do not accept any limitations when it comes to detail – whether it is for general studio work, or fashion, advertising, product or architectural photography. In combination with modern DSLR cameras, this lens delivers unprecedented image quality – even with an open aperture. ZEISS will present this new world-class lens for the first time to the public at Photokina in Cologne, Germany from September 16 to 21, 2014. 57 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  54. 54. The ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 displays all of its advantages in the classic short telephoto range, i.e. portraits and people. Its focal length, longer than a normal lens, makes it possible to keep a decent distance from the subject. Photographers who like using a landscape not just as a background will find that the ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 is no ‘normal’ lens, but a surprisingly powerful companion for nature photography. The edges of the picture can be used for compositional purposes at all f-stops. Unique creative possibilities can be achieved for pictures even with little ambient light. Today’s image sensors are extremely sensitive with little noise, which has significantly pushed the limits of what is possible even without artificial light. Fast lenses such as the ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 still offer enormous benefits compared with lenses that are two or three f-stops slower, especially when weak light meets fast-moving objects. Even when the light disappears completely, the ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 retains its excellent “vision”, just like the owl species from which this lens family gets its name. Lenses reveal correction deficits very clearly with night shots with lots of open light sources that dominate the image. Not so with the ZEISS Otus 1.4/85: in challenging lighting situations with low ambient light, the performance edge of this lens becomes obvious. The ZEISS Otus family of lenses and its newest member have been specially designed to meet professional photographers’ most rigor-ous demands. Inner focusing, the dial window, and the dials’ clearly recognizable yellow labeling, familiar from professional cine lenses like ARRI/ZEISS Master Prime, are just a few of the features that are setting new standards. The ZEISS Otus 1.4/85 will be available worldwide with EF-mount (ZE) and F-mount (ZF.2) from mid-September 2014. The expected recommended retail price in Europe is €3,360.50* or US$ 4,490* (excl. VAT). 58 PhotoTalkies by Kunzum and ZEISS
  55. 55.   About Ajay Jain Ajay Jain is a full time writer and photographer, and has authored eight paperback books and over 30 e-books. He promotes his photography as collectible art, runs the popular Kunzum Travel Cafe in New Delhi and publishes e-magazines on travel and photography. He is also a regular speaker on Mindful Travel, Personal Branding, Photography and Business Networking. All his creative ideas came to the fore only after he started travelling - mindfully. He has pursued careers in Information Technology and Sports Management before he took up journalism and writing. He holds degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Business Management and Journalism.  More  on Ajay Jain at http://ajayjain.Connect com. with him at ajay@ajayjain.com +91.9910044476. Or call his office at +91.9650702777.
  56. 56. T-49, GF, Hauz Khas Village New Delhi 110016, India Tel: +91.9650 702 777 / +91.11.2651 3949 mail@kunzum.com Timings: 11:00 a.m. - 7:30 p.m., Mondays Closed

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