ETHICAL ISSUES IN CLASSROOM RESEARCH Ceyda ÖZŞİMŞEK TUNCİL
<ul><li>Ethical issues in classroom research include being honest and fair with the participants in researh projects and m...
Informed consent <ul><li>Informed consent,  as the name suggests, refers to informing the participants and obtaining forma...
 
Two problems about Informed consent  <ul><li>1.Obtaining informed consent may prompt participants to change their behaviou...
Some ethical considerations <ul><li>Observe protocol:  Take care to ensure that the relevant people,committees and authori...
<ul><li>Involve participants:  Encourage others who have a stake in the improvement you envisage to shape the form of the ...
<ul><li>Report progress: Keep the work visible and remain open to suggestions so that unforeseen and unseen ramifications ...
<ul><li>Obtain explicit authorization before you examine files, correspondence  or other documentation : Take copies only ...
<ul><li>Negotiate accounts of others’ point of view:  Always allow those involved in interviews, meetings and written exch...
<ul><li>Negotiate reports for various levels of release : Different audiences demand different kinds of reports. </li></ul...
 
References <ul><li>Hopkins, D. (2002)  A Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Research.  Berkshire: Open University Press </li></u...
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Ethical isues in classroom research 2

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Ethical isues in classroom research 2

  1. 1. ETHICAL ISSUES IN CLASSROOM RESEARCH Ceyda ÖZŞİMŞEK TUNCİL
  2. 2. <ul><li>Ethical issues in classroom research include being honest and fair with the participants in researh projects and meeting proffesional standards for how the study will be carried out. At the outset of the study informed consent must be taken. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Informed consent <ul><li>Informed consent, as the name suggests, refers to informing the participants and obtaining formal written consent which should be granted at the initiation of the study and codified in signed consent forms. The provision of informed consent also includes the knowledge that participation is voluntary and that participants can withdraw from the study at any time. </li></ul>
  4. 5. Two problems about Informed consent <ul><li>1.Obtaining informed consent may prompt participants to change their behaviour and thus invalidate results. </li></ul><ul><li>11. The process of informed consent may not be fully understood by the participants, in which case, the documents about the study should be translated to participants’ first language or explained very clearly. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Some ethical considerations <ul><li>Observe protocol: Take care to ensure that the relevant people,committees and authorities have been consulted,informed and the necessary permission and approval has been obtained. </li></ul><ul><li>In the case of children , permission to conduct the study should always be sought from some person who has sufficient authority </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>Involve participants: Encourage others who have a stake in the improvement you envisage to shape the form of the work </li></ul><ul><li>Nego iate with those affected: Not everybody will want to be directly involved;your work should take account of the responsibilities and wishes of others </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>Report progress: Keep the work visible and remain open to suggestions so that unforeseen and unseen ramifications can be taken account of :collegues must have an opportunity to lodge a protest to you. </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain explicit authorization before you observe: For the purposes of recording the activities of professional collegues or others. </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>Obtain explicit authorization before you examine files, correspondence or other documentation : Take copies only if specific authority to do is obtained. </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiate desciptions of people’s work : Always allow those dercribed to challenge your accounts on the grounds of fairness, relevance and accuracy. </li></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>Negotiate accounts of others’ point of view: Always allow those involved in interviews, meetings and written exchanges to require amendments which enhance fairness, relevanve and accuracy. </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain explicit authorization before using quotations: Verbatim transcripts, attributed observations, excepts of audio and video recordings, judgements, conclusions or recommendations in reports </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>Negotiate reports for various levels of release : Different audiences demand different kinds of reports. </li></ul><ul><li>Accept responsibility for maintaining confidentality . </li></ul><ul><li>Retain the right to report your work: </li></ul><ul><li>Make your principles binding and known : All of the people involved in your research must agree to the principles before the work begins: others must be aware of their rights in the process. </li></ul>
  11. 13. References <ul><li>Hopkins, D. (2002) A Teacher’s Guide to Classroom Research. Berkshire: Open University Press </li></ul><ul><li>Nunan, D., Bailey, K. (2008). Exploring Second Language Classroom Research – A Comprehensive Guide </li></ul><ul><li>Zeni,Jane A Guide to ethical issues and action research http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09650799800200053 </li></ul><ul><li>  http://nurse.wu.ac.th/download/Articles/%A4%C3%D1%E9%A7%B7%D5%E87/Behi_and_Nolan-Ethical_Issues_in_Research.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.uncp.edu/home/marson/ethical_issues.html </li></ul>

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